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Windows 8 Colour Question

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User_Removed
20 Nov 2012 - 6:51 AM

Lobsterboy, your Firefox can't be colour managed if a) the pictures on that page (http://photographylife.com/is-your-browser-color-managed) look identical in IE but not in Firefox) b) you've never enabled it

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20 Nov 2012 - 6:51 AM

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lobsterboy
lobsterboy Site Moderator 1014051 forum postslobsterboy vcard United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
20 Nov 2012 - 7:02 AM

All I can tell you Chris is that on the page Glenn linked to there is no change in the images on the left in all three browsers.
On the page you linked to I really can't be sure if there is a difference or not as I have no idea how different the two should look.
Never enabled it in FF AFAIk.

Last Modified By lobsterboy at 20 Nov 2012 - 7:04 AM
GlennH
GlennH  91894 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
20 Nov 2012 - 7:14 AM

Internet Explorer is only superficially colour managed because it doesn't use the monitor profile. That makes it useless for anyone with a wide-gamut monitor, unless they have an 'sRGB mode'. Even on a standard gamut monitor you may observe subtle differences, since monitors are never a perfect sRGB fit.

By the same token neither Safari or Chrome are ideal, in that they don't account for untagged image files. In those circumstances they behave in the same fashion as IE - they default to Monitor RGB and colour management is switched off—the monitor profile disabled.

GlennH
GlennH  91894 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
20 Nov 2012 - 7:15 AM

*I believe Firefox may now have CM enabled by default.

Last Modified By GlennH at 20 Nov 2012 - 7:18 AM
User_Removed
20 Nov 2012 - 7:20 AM


Quote: I have no idea how different the two should look

They should look identical.

You need to enable Color Management in Firefox and get it to use your monitor profile (assuming you have calibrated and have one). In earlier Firefox CM turned off, in later turned on but monitor profile not selected. See here.

It looks that for anyone running Windows on a wide gamut monitor who wants to see accurate colour in images on the web that Firefox is still the only real choice Sad

GlennH
GlennH  91894 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
20 Nov 2012 - 7:44 AM

I guess Firefox defaults to the system profile (sRGB) if you don't associate a monitor profile, which is a bit of a kludge but would 'work' for many people because the gamut would be mostly or completely constrained by their hardware anyway. But still, it's obviously better to use a proper monitor profile because sRGB cannot perfectly describe or 'compensate for' your monitor's colour.

Jestertheclown
20 Nov 2012 - 7:48 AM

That works better on here too.
In the first example, the second shot was marginally lighter.
The guy does say in the comments below that a tiny difference was acceptable. I just wasn't sure how tiny it had to be.
So, as you say Chris, it would appear that Chrome and FF are colour managed.
I didn't check IE. I haven't used it in years.

GlennH
GlennH  91894 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
20 Nov 2012 - 8:05 AM

Chris_L's link seems to indicate that you need do nothing to get Firefox to recognise your monitor profile, which will be the 'system's global profile' providing it has loaded properly. It's advisable to get Firefox to recognise untagged files as sRGB, however, which is its main advantage over all other browsers (more critical for owners of wide-gamut monitors). That's not switched on by default.

Jestertheclown
20 Nov 2012 - 8:10 AM


Quote: That's not switched on by default.


Ho would I do that Glenn?
I can remember looking at profiles in FF. somewhere but that was ages ago.
Any ideas?

Last Modified By Jestertheclown at 20 Nov 2012 - 8:10 AM
lobsterboy
lobsterboy Site Moderator 1014051 forum postslobsterboy vcard United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
20 Nov 2012 - 8:14 AM


Quote: They should look identical.

But they are not identical - they have different text on them and they are on a different position on the screen so the viewing angle is slightly different. As far as I can see here is no major difference between them on my screen but as I am not comparing colours that are next to each other I can't be sure.

The overlay example is much better and all of my browsers handle it identically.

lobsterboy
lobsterboy Site Moderator 1014051 forum postslobsterboy vcard United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
20 Nov 2012 - 8:24 AM

The Whacked colour space on the right of this page seems to make it easy to see what is going on. I just tried it on my work FF/chrome & IE9 on Windows 7 and they all seem to pick up the profiles as well.

User_Removed
20 Nov 2012 - 8:49 AM


Quote:
Ho would I do that Glenn?

Read the last page I linked to. Have you got a wide gamut monitor Bren?

GlennH
GlennH  91894 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
20 Nov 2012 - 8:56 AM


Quote: Ho would I do that Glenn?
I can remember looking at profiles in FF. somewhere but that was ages ago.
Any ideas?

Yes, plug 'about:config' into the Firefox address bar, then switch the value of gfx.color_management.mode to '1'. By default it's set to '2', which enables colour management but only for tagged images.

Jestertheclown
20 Nov 2012 - 9:22 AM


Quote: Read the last page I linked to. Have you got a wide gamut monitor Bren?

Thanks Chris, I'd completely missed that. (I'm not on the ball this morning!)
To answer your question; no, I don't have a wide gamut monitor.
I use a cheap one that I got from Staples or somewhere a few years ago.

GlennH
GlennH  91894 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
20 Nov 2012 - 9:29 AM

You can get a visual idea on the gamut of your monitor by opening this link again in any browser other than Firefox (unless Firefox is at default settings).

In the top two overlays, if untagged sRGB on the right looks pretty much identical to the tagged Adobe RGB on the left you have a standard gamut monitor; if the colour is very exaggerated it's a wide gamut, and untagged Adobe RGB may give you a better match; if you have a standard gamut [usually desktop] monitor with a middling gamut, or with particular 'spikes' of strong colour, you'll see differences in those hues where your monitor exceeds the sRGB gamut.

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