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Most digital cameras have a slot that takes a removable memory card such as MemoryStick, SmartMedia or CompactFlash. The camera uses this card to store pictures. Several sizes can be purchased from 2Mb to up to 1Gb depending on the make and type.

Related Terms

Stands for Personal Computer Memory Card International Association - a group of 25 companies in 1989 who set worldwide standards for compact removable memory cards. These included Type I, II and III cards and were used to store images in a professionally specified camera or add extra functions to a computer. They have largely been superceded by the much smaller CompactFlash and an adaptor is available for older cameras to take the newer cards.
A removable memory card used in digital cameras to store pictures. The current maximum capacity is 256Mb.
Developed jointly by Kodak, Canon, Fuji and Matsushita, DPOF is a function that appears in some digital cameras to allow users to order prints of specific pictures from files stored on the cameras memory card, such as CompactFlash, SmartMedia or floppy d
Removable memory card introduced by Sony that's currently available in sizes up to 64Mb.
A removable memory card thats used in digital cameras, phones and MP3 players to store pictures, data or sound.
A graphics card thats built into a computer to control how many colours are seen on the monitor.
A picture file format that some of the more advanced cameras have the option of using when taking photographs. In this mode the photograph is captured in a "raw"state direct from the camera's CCD so no automated processing is done by the camera. You then use RAW processing software such as Capture One to view and process the file on your computer giving you complete control of properties such as exposure, colour and sharpness. This mode is preferred by enthusiast and professional photographers who tailor settings to there liking. The downside is the file is not compressed by the camera, like it is in normal jpg shooting mode so you can only shoot a small number of photos before the memory card fills up.
Found on Nikon Coolpix digital cameras, this mode takes a series of shots but will only save the sharpest one to the memory card, which can help to achieve a sharp shot in low light where flash photography is prohibited.
Indicates whether the camera can be connected to a TV to view the results. If it has PAL it can be played on UK-televisions or NTSC for US. Image quality looks as good as it would on a computer screen and if the camera has a slide show mode it can be left to run through all the pictures stored in the camera's memory or card.