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Brand:NIKON CORPORATION
Camera:Nikon D3100 Check out Nikon Nation!
Lens:18.0-55.0 mm f/3.5-5.6
Recording media:JPEG (digital)
Date Taken:5 Sep 2013 - 3:45 PM
Focal Length:50mm
Lens Max Aperture:f/5.7
Aperture:f/5.6
Shutter Speed:1/100sec
Exposure Comp:0.0
ISO:400
Exposure Mode:Manual
Metering Mode:Spot
Flash:No Flash
White Balance:Auto
Title:Back yard
Username:derrymaine derrymaine
Uploaded:6 Sep 2013 - 5:19 AM
Tags:Black & white, Close-up / macro, Composition, Object, Specialist / abstract, Still life
VS Mode Rating 98 (37.5% won)
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Votes:7

Comments

SiHunt_GrafficSnapZ

Interesting image, the Dof and focal point make it unusual. Si.

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NDODS
NDODS e2 Member 33063 forum postsNDODS vcard United Kingdom101 Constructive Critique Points
6 Sep 2013 - 4:48 PMConstructive Critique!This comment was flagged as constructive critique! 

An unusual subject and one which has interest. However unfortunately there is a lot of detail lost due to over exposure. Try bracketting to compensate for this, and I guarantee you won't have many or any more problems with over exposure.

What is Exposure bracketing?

Exposure bracketing is a simple technique professional photographers use to ensure they properly expose their pictures, especially in challenging lighting situations.

When you expose for a scene, your camera's light meter will select an aperture / shutter speed combination that it believes will give a properly exposed picture.

Exposure bracketing means that you take two more pictures: one slightly under-exposed (usually by dialing in a negative exposure compensation, say -1/3EV), and the second one slightly over-exposed (usually by dialing in a positive exposure compensation, say +1/3EV), again according to your camera's light meter.

The reason you do this is because the camera might have been 'deceived' by the light (too much or too little) available and your main subject may be over- or under-exposed. By taking these three shots, you are making sure that if this were ever the case, then you would have properly compensated for it.

As an example, say you are taking a scene where there is an abundance of light around your main subject (for example, at the beach on a sunny day, or surrounded by snow). In this case, using Weighted-Average metering, your camera might be 'deceived' by the abundance of light and expose for it by closing down the aperture and/or using a faster shuter speed (assuming ISO is constant), with the result that the main subject might be under-exposed. By taking an extra shot at a slight over-exposure, you would in fact be over-exposing the surroundings, but properly exposing the main subject.

Another example would be the case where the surrounding might be too dark, and the camera exposes for the lack of light by either opening up the aperture and/or using a slower shutter speed (assuming ISO is constant), then the main subject might be over-exposed. By taking an extra shot at a slight under-exposure, you would in fact be under-exposing the surroundings, but properly exposing the main subject.

Now, most digital cameras have auto exposure bracketing (AEB), meaning that if you select that option before taking your shot, the camera will automatically take three shots for you: one which it thinks it has perfectly exposed; a second one sightly under-exposed; and the third one slightly over-exposed. The amount of under- and over-exposure usually defaults to -1/3EV and +1/3EV, but can also sometimes to specified in SETUP, e.g. you may want to use -1EV and +1EV instead.

When should you use exposure bracketing? Anytime you feel the scene is a challenging one (too much highlights or shadows) as far as lighting is concerned -- e.g. sunsets are usually better taken slightly under-exposed so use exposure bracketing there -- or whenever you want to be sure you don't improperly expose a fabulous shot that you may not get the chance to go back and take again.

Regards Nathan

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derrymaine
6 Sep 2013 - 5:00 PM

[quote]An unusual subject and one which has interest. However unfortunately there is a lot of detail lost due to over exposure. Try bracketting to compensate for this, and I guarantee you won't have many or any more problems with over exposure.

Cheers for the constructive words!
I think I over-edited really, I'll post the original one tomorrow probably, the highlights are much LESS exposed really. I don't know why I highlighted them more. I took a couple of shots with different speed, and I prefered this one. I'm using manual mode for the aperture and the speed. I don't mess with the meter, it's always at 0.0 unless I really need to change it. I'll probably do next time, experiment with the bracketing thing, messing around with the meter, and not the speed or aperture.
Thanks again!

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