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this waterfall NEAR CONSETT

Brand:Canon
Camera:Canon EOS 600D
Lens:18.0 - 55.0 mm (35 mm equivalent: 28.5 - 87.0 mm)
Recording media:JPEG (digital)
Date Taken:7 Aug 2011 - 3:12 PM
Focal Length:30mm
Aperture:f/13.0
Shutter Speed:0.4sec
Exposure Comp:0.0
ISO:200
Metering Mode:Evaluative
Flash:Off, Did not fire
Title:close up
Username:hallcro hallcro
Uploaded:10 Aug 2011 - 2:34 PM
Tags:General, Watefall
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Votes:3

Comments

BrianSS
BrianSS  7281 forum posts England35 Constructive Critique Points
10 Aug 2011 - 6:34 PM

It looks a wonderful waterfall, nice composition and good use of shutter speed but sadly a good deal of the image is burnt out with no detail there.

Check the histogram after taking a shot or better still (if your camera has one) check the highlights screen.

Last Modified By BrianSS at 10 Aug 2011 - 6:38 PM

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iancatch
iancatch  7 England45 Constructive Critique Points
10 Aug 2011 - 8:06 PM

As stated above most of the image is burnt out but there are a few ways around this.

You can shoot in aperture priority and use a large F number which will close down the aperture and give you a greater depth of field which is good on both accounts as it keeps the whole image sharp or you can use a high stop neutral density filter which will allow long exposures in bright light and stop burn out. The are a couple of good ones on the market which are the big stopper from lee filters or a 500nd filter from light workshops I think it is called. Also you could try shortening the exposure.

Also I have noticed that you have used ISO 200. reducing this to ISO 100 will also reduce the burn out.

And of course you could use a combination of two or of all three suggestions.

Hope this is useful

Ian

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hallcro
hallcro  6 United Kingdom
11 Aug 2011 - 9:09 AM

all comments taken on board

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