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Crooked House

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No.12 Market Place, Lavenham, Suffolk – a 15th or 16th century timber-framed and plastered building, with wisteria growing up the front of it.

Lavenham is probably England’s best preserved medieval town and it is believed by some that the distorted, or "crooked", appearance of many of the town's timber-framed buildings may have inspired the English nursery rhyme, "There Was A Crooked Man” -

There was a crooked man, and he walked a crooked mile,
He found a crooked sixpence against a crooked stile,
He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked mouse,
And they all lived together in a little crooked house.

Thanks for all the C&Cs on 'Crow's-nest' - of which there were two!

Best wishes,
Philip

Brand:Panasonic
Camera:Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ45
Recording media:JPEG (digital)
Date Taken:27 May 2012 - 9:49 AM
Focal Length:10.5mm
Lens Max Aperture:f/2.8
Aperture:f/5.0
Shutter Speed:1/200sec
Exposure Comp:0.0
ISO:80
Exposure Mode:Landscape
Metering Mode:Multi-segment
Flash:Off, Did not fire
White Balance:Auto
Title:Crooked House
Username:Philip_H Philip_H
Uploaded:19 Mar 2013 - 6:03 PM
Tags:Architecture, House, Jetty, Lavenham, Leaded lights, Listed building, Market place, No.12, Suffolk, Timber-framed, Windows, Wisteria
Votes:28

Comments

NDODS
NDODS e2 Member 32925 forum postsNDODS vcard United Kingdom99 Constructive Critique Points
19 Mar 2013 - 6:09 PM

An interesting foreword Phillip. However the star of the show is the wonderfully Wisteria clad Tudor facade.

Nathan

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Suzicoo
Suzicoo e2 Member 2389 forum postsSuzicoo vcard United Kingdom
19 Mar 2013 - 6:11 PM

looks nice with the wisteria, there are certainly lots of crooked houses in Lavenham. Didn't know the connection to the "nursery rhyme"
Suzicoo

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CarolG
CarolG e2 Member 7128 forum postsCarolG vcard Greece16 Constructive Critique Points
19 Mar 2013 - 6:22 PM

What a wonderful old house, and made all the more charming by that glorious wisteria. Well captured, Philip. Carol

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WhiteRose1
WhiteRose1 e2 Member 41029 forum postsWhiteRose1 vcard England133 Constructive Critique Points
19 Mar 2013 - 6:55 PM

A very good section from the frontage, Phillip. Lovely shadows, shapes and diagonal wisteria.

Dave

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nonur
nonur e2 Member 5nonur vcard Turkey8 Constructive Critique Points
19 Mar 2013 - 7:56 PM


Quote: An interesting foreword Phillip. However the star of the show is the wonderfully Wisteria clad Tudor facade.

Nathan

I fully agree with Nathan. A great shot.

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Mrsbass
Mrsbass  1 United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
19 Mar 2013 - 8:21 PM

Lovely and charming - especially with your nursery rhyme - the wisteria is gorgeous and the sun is casting warm shadows accross the tudor frontage. Beautiful.

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EAS
EAS e2 Member 5EAS vcard Scotland13 Constructive Critique Points
19 Mar 2013 - 8:56 PM

The wonderful old structure really sets off the Wisteria perfectly!

Ann

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Meheecho
Meheecho  1275 forum posts United Kingdom
19 Mar 2013 - 8:59 PM

A place I've been to on many occasions -- lovely location and your image does this part justice
Steve

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xwang
xwang  531 forum posts7 Constructive Critique Points
19 Mar 2013 - 10:19 PM

GrinGrin.. When i become a crooked woman, I'll walk crooked miles, to visit the crooked cat and the crooked man in their crooked house...Grin

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Hermanus
Hermanus  2 South Africa
20 Mar 2013 - 4:16 AM

Thanx Philip - now I also know where that song originated Smile Excellent write up with this superb photo !!

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Philip_H
Philip_H  2 United Kingdom
20 Mar 2013 - 6:00 PM


Quote: Looks nice with the wisteria, there are certainly lots of crooked houses in Lavenham. Didn't know the connection to the "nursery rhyme"
Suzicoo


Quote:

Thanx Philip - now I also know where that song originated Smile Excellent write up with this superb photo !!

There is a another school of thought (far more likely) which suggest that the origin of the nursery rhyme "There was a crooked man" is in British history and relates to King Charles I. This suggests that the crooked man is reputed to be the Scottish General Sir Alexander Leslie. The General signed a Covenant securing religious and political freedom for Scotland. The 'crooked stile' referred to in "There was a crooked man" being the border between England and Scotland. 'They all lived together in a little crooked house' refers to the fact that the English and Scots had at last come to an agreement. The words reflect the times when there was great animosity between the English and the Scots. The word crooked is pronounced as 'crookED' the emphasis being placed upon the 'ED' in the word. This was common in olde England and many references can be found in this type of pronunciation in the works of William Shakespeare (1564-1616).

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