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Lobelia

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This is a simple Lobelia taken in my garden shortly after I got my camera last Summer. It is my first attempt at something like this on EPZ and would welcome any mods. or suggestions that could enhance a basic shot like this. It is just as it came out of the camera

Brand:Panasonic
Camera:Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150
Recording media:JPEG (digital)
Date Taken:20 Jul 2012 - 5:09 PM
Focal Length:4.5mm
Lens Max Aperture:f/2.8
Aperture:f/4.0
Shutter Speed:1/200sec
Exposure Comp:+0.33
ISO:100
Exposure Mode:Program AE
Metering Mode:Multi-segment
Flash:Off, Did not fire
White Balance:Auto
Title:Lobelia
Username:mauriceegan mauriceegan
Uploaded:6 Feb 2013 - 12:42 PM
Tags:Close-up / macro, Flowers & plants
VS Mode Rating 97 (0% won)
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Comments

This photo is here for critique. Please only comment constructively and with suggestions on how to improve it.
leontari
leontari e2 Member 1leontari vcard Greece
6 Feb 2013 - 12:45 PM

A lovely close up, very well taken.
Effrossini

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paulbroad
paulbroad  681 forum posts United Kingdom840 Constructive Critique Points
6 Feb 2013 - 2:12 PM

Quite nice. It could do to be a bit crisper. When shooting with plenty of time, use camera support if possible, a tripod. Then manually focus with care. Here on the flower centre. Use a small aperture for best depth of field and chose a perfect bloom, or clone in any petal defects later.

Paul

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Hermanus
Hermanus  2 South Africa
6 Feb 2013 - 2:24 PM

We call these Impatience here and in some regions they are even called water fuchsias Smile A lovely photo !!

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Meheecho
Meheecho  1275 forum posts United Kingdom
6 Feb 2013 - 2:37 PM

I'm not in a position to discuss the technicalities--I leave that to the experts!! but I think this is a lovely image and well presented
Steve

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Tish1
Tish1 e2 Member 1Tish1 vcard United Kingdom
6 Feb 2013 - 2:49 PM

I thought it was a Bizzie Lizzie, but what do I know, like the shot, but sadly do not have the expertise to advise.

Tish

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canonfan
canonfan  4 United Kingdom
6 Feb 2013 - 3:23 PM

This is a lovely image
Jim

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mauriceegan
6 Feb 2013 - 4:10 PM

Thank you all for your comments much appreciated. Tish you are right, just checked with my wife who is the gardener in our house and she tells me it is Bizzie Lizzie, shows how much I know about flowers GrinGrinGrin
Maurice

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iancrowson
iancrowson e2 Member 4209 forum postsiancrowson vcard United Kingdom128 Constructive Critique Points
6 Feb 2013 - 5:54 PM

Yes a nice picture. Good colours.
Because of the camera angle the main subject looks flat.
Like a human face flowers often better and more interesting photographed from an angle rather than full face. These flowers have some pleasing curves to their petals as seen top right.
Try and include all of the flower well within the frame rather than having a bit touching the edge.
As regards the composition try to have just one flower in the frame or at least in focus, this directs the viewer to the main subject.
Look at the plant from different angles to see if one flower stands alone, consider the background, out of focus or plain as possible. A lot of flower photographer when taking a flower portrait place a plain card behind the flower.
Sometimes one flower in focus on a full plant can be interesting.
Best of all study other flower photos, there are some brilliant ones on this site.
regards
Ian

Last Modified By iancrowson at 6 Feb 2013 - 5:56 PM

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gajewski
gajewski e2 Member 9gajewski vcard United States9 Constructive Critique Points
6 Feb 2013 - 6:45 PM

I like this image. I don't really have anything to add in terms of technical suggestions. I like what others have already contributed.
-=\Walter

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pamelajean
pamelajean Critique Team 8748 forum postspamelajean vcard United Kingdom1575 Constructive Critique Points
6 Feb 2013 - 8:21 PMConstructive Critique!This comment was flagged as constructive critique! 

Your Exif says AE, but you tag this as Macro, Maurice, and so I am wondering if you used the macro setting on your camera for this.

You certainly got nice and close, and have focused on the centre of the flower. You have a very shallow depth of field, with the outside of the petals not so sharp. It all depends upon your intention, of course, but a smaller aperture/higher f-stop would have given you more of the flower in focus. Although this gives you a greater depth of field, it also gives you a slower shutter speed, for which you might need a tripod or some kind of support for your camera, to avoid movement. Experiment with your shooting distance, taking shots of just the centre of the flower or try changing the position of the flower to shoot it on a slight angle.
Ian has made some good points, leaving little else to say. However, it's important in flower photography to either shoot a part of the flower or the whole of it, as here, and to keep all of the petals inside your frame.
Compositionally, if you can avoid including other flowers in your frame, so much the better, as they tend to distract the eye from your main subject. A little bit of judicious "gardening" pays off, just moving others out of the way. An alternative is to have two or three flowers together in your frame, possibly overlapping, as it adds depth and interest. Including foliage is a good idea, as it's quite natural and yet not distracting.
Try to get your flowers photographed when they are at their absolute best, and avoid any damaged ones.
Some flowers look better shot straight on and others straight down, it all depends on the flower, and the best way to find out is to experiment.
Pamela.

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milky
milky e2 Member 10milky vcard Wales
6 Feb 2013 - 9:12 PM

Nice image lov the colour-------Milky

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sweetpea62
sweetpea62 e2 Member 3sweetpea62 vcard United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
6 Feb 2013 - 10:40 PM

Beautiful colour..Lin

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paulbroad
paulbroad  681 forum posts United Kingdom840 Constructive Critique Points
7 Feb 2013 - 9:04 AM

Two people say they cannot advise. You can. Does it seem sharp enough to you? Could it be better composed? Would you do anything different.?

Beginner or advanced, you do have an opinion and this is where to say it. You don't need to be an expert to have an opinion. If you cannot recognise un-sharp images, those incorrectly exposed etc. How are you going to improve.

Paul

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ugly
ugly e2 Member 6ugly vcard United Kingdom55 Constructive Critique Points
7 Feb 2013 - 12:34 PM


Quote: Your Exif says AE, but you tag this as Macro, Maurice, and so I am wondering if you used the macro setting on your camera for this.

You certainly got nice and close, and have focused on the centre of the flower. You have a very shallow depth of field, with the outside of the petals not so sharp. It all depends upon your intention, of course, but a smaller aperture/higher f-stop would have given you more of the flower in focus. Although this gives you a greater depth of field, it also gives you a slower shutter speed, for which you might need a tripod or some kind of support for your camera, to avoid movement. Experiment with your shooting distance, taking shots of just the centre of the flower or try changing the position of the flower to shoot it on a slight angle.
Ian has made some good points, leaving little else to say. However, it's important in flower photography to either shoot a part of the flower or the whole of it, as here, and to keep all of the petals inside your frame.
Compositionally, if you can avoid including other flowers in your frame, so much the better, as they tend to distract the eye from your main subject. A little bit of judicious "gardening" pays off, just moving others out of the way. An alternative is to have two or three flowers together in your frame, possibly overlapping, as it adds depth and interest. Including foliage is a good idea, as it's quite natural and yet not distracting.
Try to get your flowers photographed when they are at their absolute best, and avoid any damaged ones.
Some flowers look better shot straight on and others straight down, it all depends on the flower, and the best way to find out is to experiment.
Pamela.

Good advice..

Dave

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mauriceegan
7 Feb 2013 - 12:46 PM

Thanks for the many comments and suggestions they are greatly appreciated. This was one of the very first photos I took when I got my camera and had very little knowledge at the time. I will take all of the suggestions on board and put them to good effect. It has been a very valuable learning experience for me Thank you all again.
Regards
Maurice

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