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Plump Robin

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This cheeky chap was snapped at my local farm shop

Brand:Panasonic
Camera:Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ4
Recording media:JPEG (digital)
Date Taken:7 Jan 2010 - 3:11 PM
Focal Length:47mm
Lens Max Aperture:f/3.3
Aperture:f/4.9
Shutter Speed:1/80sec
Exposure Comp:0.0
ISO:100
Exposure Mode:Program AE
Metering Mode:Multi-segment
Flash:On, Fired
White Balance:Auto
Title:Plump Robin
Username:carsxyz2 carsxyz2
Uploaded:23 Apr 2014 - 8:36 PM
Tags:Bird robin, Wildlife / nature
VS Mode Rating 101 (100% won)
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Votes:1

Comments

Stenk
Stenk  7 England6 Constructive Critique Points
23 Apr 2014 - 9:35 PM

Its a nice idea but it doesn't quite work, not always easy to get when in amongst the branches. The bird is not in focus, the eyes need to be sharp, the background is too bright and twig in front of the Robin is off putting, sorry.

Stenk
(Steve Walters Photography)

Nominating Constructive Critique

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philhomer
philhomer  437 forum posts England32 Constructive Critique Points
24 Apr 2014 - 9:01 AM

I'm afraid i cannot argue with the above but if you are relatively new to either photography or the camera then perhaps this will help a little.

Your camera 'sees' the white background and 'thinks' "cor, that's bright". In then calculates what it "thinks" is a reasonable mid-tonal range for the image.
As such, any subject darker than the prevailing background will be a little dark.

In such an instance you simply have to be cleverer than the camera and be brave enough to tell it that it is wrong. Use of a little exposure compensation (see link) would allow the correct exposure of the subject, although the background will be brighter - but without post-processing, it's a simple compromise and surely the subject is more important in this instance.

Here is another link, this time to the EC instructions specific to your camera.

A simple and sometimes effective alternative is to switch to 'spot metering' so that the camera reads a specific area (generally centre) and not the whole image for exposure - not the method i personally use but it can work.

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