Login or Join Now

Upload your photos, chat, win prizes and much more

Username:
Password:
Remember Me

Can't Access your Account?

New to ePHOTOzine? Join ePHOTOzine for free!

Sparrowhawk

Join Now

Join ePHOTOzine, the friendliest photography community.

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more for free!

55% OFF new PortraitPro 12 - use code EPHZROS414.
Add Comment

I spotted this sparrowhawk in my garden. A lot meaner looking than my normal robins and goldfinches!

Brand:OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.
Camera:Olympus E-500 Check out Olympus Image Space!
Lens:Olympus 70-300
Recording media:JPEG (digital)
Date Taken:17 Dec 2010 - 3:38 PM
Focal Length:300mm
Lens Max Aperture:f/4.0
Aperture:f/5.6
Shutter Speed:1/60sec
Exposure Comp:0.0
ISO:400
Exposure Mode:Program AE
Metering Mode:Multi-segment
Flash:On, Did not fire
Title:Sparrowhawk
Username:Joools Joools
Uploaded:20 Feb 2011 - 12:37 AM
Tags:Bird, Sparrowhawk, Wildlife / nature
VS Mode Rating Unrated
These stats show the percentage of wins and the rating score that your photo has achieved. You can go to the VS Mode by clicking on this icon.

Signup to e2

Signup to e2 to see which photo this has won or lost against in the vs mode
Votes:12

Comments

accipiter
accipiter e2 Member 4accipiter vcard England56 Constructive Critique Points
20 Feb 2011 - 6:29 AM

Well captured. A

Nominating Constructive Critique

Please ensure that you understand what is meant by Constructive Critique - see FAQ here. If you still wish to nominate this comment click Yes

davey_griffo
20 Feb 2011 - 11:06 AMConstructive Critique!This comment was flagged as constructive critique! 

I shouldn't be at all surprised if it's the robins & goldfinches that attracted it down.

I nearly had a shot of one once. Might even have got it, if I hadn't left the camera in the boot of my car. Smile

One thing I have noticed with all of your bird shots is that the focus is off. They all look a little soft. Since you are using D-SLRs, I don't think we can blame the equipment.

This looks to me like it was either a fairly extreme crop from the original, or the autofocus just focused on something else. I'm assuming here that you are relatively new to using D-SLRs, so the best piece of advice I can give is watch the viewfinder/display, as it tells you exactly what the camera is doing.

If you had to make a crop from the original shot, & you see yourself doing a lot of wildlife, a good investment would be a longer lens. I have a Tamron 200-500mm which didn't come cheap (no pun intended Smile), but gets you right into the thick of things.

As far as focus goes, in the viewfinder you'll have noticed a series of dots/squares/lines/lights, usually in a diamond pattern. These are the focus points. Watch which one is light up when focus is acquired (usually you get a double bleep from the camera). If it's not over your subject, the camera has made the wrong choice about what to focus on.

The way it works is that the camera looks at all the focus points to see if it can get sharp focus. Hence all the whirring from the motors, before it settles & bleeps. If it can focus on more than one, it usually picks the one closest to the camera. Focus then becomes locked until you press the button all the way down (taking a photo), or release the button.

In the case of your shot above, it probably got sharp focus on the bird & the tree, choosing the tree as it's closer. Sometimes when you have a viewfinder as busy as this, it's better to go for spot focus, which forces the camera to use only the centre point, or manual. But often you can get what you want by releasing the shutter button & trying again.

It's worth persevering, as the cameras you've used are capable of much better focus than this, & you'll get some shots you can really be proud of.

Last Modified By davey_griffo at 20 Feb 2011 - 11:24 AM

Nominating Constructive Critique

Please ensure that you understand what is meant by Constructive Critique - see FAQ here. If you still wish to nominate this comment click Yes

Joools
Joools e2 Member 5Joools vcard United Kingdom
20 Feb 2011 - 3:06 PM

Hi Dave
Thanks very much for your helpful advice. In the case of the photo above, I just grabbed the camera and only had chance to shoot a few shots. The other bird shots were on my first trip out with my new Nikon equipment after recently ditching all my Olympus stuff so I'm still getting totally to grips with everything - practice makes perfect so I'll keep trying and use your advice to hopefully get a bit better!
I'm hoping to invest in a longer lens very shortly but am a bit skint just now after having to start again with Nikon. Otherwise I shall just have to wait on my lottery numbers coming up!
Cheers
Julie

Nominating Constructive Critique

Please ensure that you understand what is meant by Constructive Critique - see FAQ here. If you still wish to nominate this comment click Yes

davey_griffo
20 Feb 2011 - 6:28 PM

Well good luck. There are plenty of people who'll give you advice (myself included, as you've probably noticed Smile) if you get stuck. If you don't get an answer on your shot, post a query in the forums. Don't be afraid to ask. Someone's bound to answer.

Thanks for the CC point, btw. Always appreciated.

Nominating Constructive Critique

Please ensure that you understand what is meant by Constructive Critique - see FAQ here. If you still wish to nominate this comment click Yes

- Original Poster Comments
- Your Posts

Add a Comment

You must be a member to leave a comment

Username:
Password:
Remember me:
Un-tick this box if you want to login each time you visit.