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Sundown

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Really wanted to capture the little sun with the waves like this one, but I could not control light of the sky together with the sea. Either the sky is over exposure or the sea is too dark Sad
I will be very grateful if someone can guide how to mange this type of photography technique

Brand:Canon
Camera:Canon EOS 5D MkII
Lens:EF16-35mm f/2.8L II USM
Recording media:JPEG (digital)
Date Taken:13 Feb 2013 - 5:56 PM
Focal Length:35mm
Lens Max Aperture:f/2.8
Aperture:f/22.0
Shutter Speed:1/4sec
Exposure Comp:0.0
ISO:50
Exposure Mode:Manual
Metering Mode:Spot
Flash:Off, Did not fire
White Balance:Custom
Title:Sundown
Username:thaiph thaiph
Uploaded:19 Feb 2013 - 1:33 AM
Tags:General, Landscape / travel, Wildlife / nature
VS Mode Rating 100 (44.44% won)
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Comments

This photo is here for critique. Please only comment constructively and with suggestions on how to improve it.
paskinmj
paskinmj  5 United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
19 Feb 2013 - 1:43 AM

Great exposure and lovely pastel colours.
Matt

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paulbroad
paulbroad  681 forum posts United Kingdom840 Constructive Critique Points
19 Feb 2013 - 8:41 AM

What is there to manage. I'm not a fan of creamy water, but you haven't over done this one and it is technically about as good as it gets. Nice shot.

Paul

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Philpot
Philpot e2 Member 1Philpot vcard United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
19 Feb 2013 - 1:22 PMConstructive Critique!This comment was flagged as constructive critique! 

The image is good as presented imo, as mentioned above the water flow is good too.
Regarding your exposure issue you would need to use ND grad filters which would allow an even exposure throughout the image, if you pm me I can give you some sites to check out. The other way is to bracket three or more images then use software to "mix the three exposures, either by HDR or using layers and masks, I used to do the later but its too time consuming and Iíve managed to get some nice Lee Filter ND Grads, for sea like this where the horizon is straight you would need to use a hard grad, but if the horizon is not flat with say buildings or mountains then a soft grad should be used. Hope this helps.

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thaiph
thaiph  2
19 Feb 2013 - 4:01 PM


Quote: The image is good as presented imo, as mentioned above the water flow is good too.
Regarding your exposure issue you would need to use ND grad filters which would allow an even exposure throughout the image, if you pm me I can give you some sites to check out. The other way is to bracket three or more images then use software to "mix the three exposures, either by HDR or using layers and masks, I used to do the later but its too time consuming and Iíve managed to get some nice Lee Filter ND Grads, for sea like this where the horizon is straight you would need to use a hard grad, but if the horizon is not flat with say buildings or mountains then a soft grad should be used. Hope this helps.

Many thanks Philpot, I will try to mix multiple exposures then see how far I can go from here, the ND grad filters will be the next thing on my list Smile

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banehawi
banehawi Critique Team 10777 forum postsbanehawi vcard Canada2779 Constructive Critique Points
19 Feb 2013 - 5:35 PM

ND grad is the way to go if you intend doing a lot of this type of shot.

But, this one isnt bad, and if you shot in RAW, and adjusted white balance and exposure in post processing, your result would closer resemble the mod I uploaded.

The original white balance is too cool.


regards


Willie

Last Modified By banehawi at 19 Feb 2013 - 5:35 PM

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NEWMANP
NEWMANP e2 Member 61583 forum postsNEWMANP vcard United Kingdom574 Constructive Critique Points
19 Feb 2013 - 9:28 PMConstructive Critique!This comment was flagged as constructive critique! 

Hello,
this one is nice and well handled as are your other uploads. as you seem to favour low light seascapes i d suggest that you check out a couple of members on epz who are favourites of mine and both specialise in seascape.
dmhuynh72 and pmorgan.

its all about dynamic range and your sensors ability or rather inability to capture the full range of the exposure between the highlights and darker areas. subject to the level of contrast and whether the sun is included or not, the difference between the sea and sky will often be between 2 and 5 f stops.

you can help to reduce the contrast by keeping the sunball just outside the edge of frame.

the first thing you need to do is shoot in raw because this enables a variety of adjustments and allows you to make several exposures from one raw to enable a degree of exposure blending in raw. i often adjust the raw to give a best sky and a best sea and copy one layer over the other and erase the layer to reveal the best compromise.

but you must have in your kit at least 2 graduated neutral density filters. if you choose Lee or hitech they come in hard or soft edge and 0.3 / 0.6 / 0.9 0.3= 1 stop 0.6=2 stop 0.9= 3stop
they are not cheap and Lee are my personal favourites. i have too many and if i had to choose just 2 it would be 0.9 hard and 0.9 soft the soft enables a little lattitude as you can slide it up or down to increase the effect a little and i often use them together. a 0.9 soft would have covered most even toned images like yours but with a brighter sun you may well need them both together. if you must include the sunball then you can get some with the grad reversed and they are dark on the horizon line fading upwards and they are good with unobstructed horizons such as seascapes without rocks breaking the lines.

if you check out pmorgan, on epz contact him and i believe he sells a CD with comprehensive details on his processing methods and im sure that seldom do his images come direct from the back of the camera so to get the very best effects, photoshop skill may well be required.

Willie has suggested a colour balance adjustment and although thats a right and fair comment, my own experiences tells me that sunrises and sunsets take a huge range of hues and this can change from country to country too so adjust to how you see it or remember it but here it could be a little cool in the sky but it suits the water well.

Hope this helps
Phil

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thaiph
thaiph  2
20 Feb 2013 - 3:18 PM


Quote: ND grad is the way to go if you intend doing a lot of this type of shot.

But, this one isnt bad, and if you shot in RAW, and adjusted white balance and exposure in post processing, your result would closer resemble the mod I uploaded.

The original white balance is too cool.


regards


Willie

Many thanks for the modification, I like it Smile

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thaiph
thaiph  2
20 Feb 2013 - 3:23 PM


Quote: Hello,
this one is nice and well handled as are your other uploads. as you seem to favour low light seascapes i d suggest that you check out a couple of members on epz who are favourites of mine and both specialise in seascape.
dmhuynh72 and pmorgan.

its all about dynamic range and your sensors ability or rather inability to capture the full range of the exposure between the highlights and darker areas. subject to the level of contrast and whether the sun is included or not, the difference between the sea and sky will often be between 2 and 5 f stops.

you can help to reduce the contrast by keeping the sunball just outside the edge of frame.

the first thing you need to do is shoot in raw because this enables a variety of adjustments and allows you to make several exposures from one raw to enable a degree of exposure blending in raw. i often adjust the raw to give a best sky and a best sea and copy one layer over the other and erase the layer to reveal the best compromise.

but you must have in your kit at least 2 graduated neutral density filters. if you choose Lee or hitech they come in hard or soft edge and 0.3 / 0.6 / 0.9 0.3= 1 stop 0.6=2 stop 0.9= 3stop
they are not cheap and Lee are my personal favourites. i have too many and if i had to choose just 2 it would be 0.9 hard and 0.9 soft the soft enables a little lattitude as you can slide it up or down to increase the effect a little and i often use them together. a 0.9 soft would have covered most even toned images like yours but with a brighter sun you may well need them both together. if you must include the sunball then you can get some with the grad reversed and they are dark on the horizon line fading upwards and they are good with unobstructed horizons such as seascapes without rocks breaking the lines.

if you check out pmorgan, on epz contact him and i believe he sells a CD with comprehensive details on his processing methods and im sure that seldom do his images come direct from the back of the camera so to get the very best effects, photoshop skill may well be required.

Willie has suggested a colour balance adjustment and although thats a right and fair comment, my own experiences tells me that sunrises and sunsets take a huge range of hues and this can change from country to country too so adjust to how you see it or remember it but here it could be a little cool in the sky but it suits the water well.

Hope this helps
Phil


Quote: Hello,
this one is nice and well handled as are your other uploads. as you seem to favour low light seascapes i d suggest that you check out a couple of members on epz who are favourites of mine and both specialise in seascape.
dmhuynh72 and pmorgan.

its all about dynamic range and your sensors ability or rather inability to capture the full range of the exposure between the highlights and darker areas. subject to the level of contrast and whether the sun is included or not, the difference between the sea and sky will often be between 2 and 5 f stops.

you can help to reduce the contrast by keeping the sunball just outside the edge of frame.

the first thing you need to do is shoot in raw because this enables a variety of adjustments and allows you to make several exposures from one raw to enable a degree of exposure blending in raw. i often adjust the raw to give a best sky and a best sea and copy one layer over the other and erase the layer to reveal the best compromise.

but you must have in your kit at least 2 graduated neutral density filters. if you choose Lee or hitech they come in hard or soft edge and 0.3 / 0.6 / 0.9 0.3= 1 stop 0.6=2 stop 0.9= 3stop
they are not cheap and Lee are my personal favourites. i have too many and if i had to choose just 2 it would be 0.9 hard and 0.9 soft the soft enables a little lattitude as you can slide it up or down to increase the effect a little and i often use them together. a 0.9 soft would have covered most even toned images like yours but with a brighter sun you may well need them both together. if you must include the sunball then you can get some with the grad reversed and they are dark on the horizon line fading upwards and they are good with unobstructed horizons such as seascapes without rocks breaking the lines.

if you check out pmorgan, on epz contact him and i believe he sells a CD with comprehensive details on his processing methods and im sure that seldom do his images come direct from the back of the camera so to get the very best effects, photoshop skill may well be required.

Willie has suggested a colour balance adjustment and although thats a right and fair comment, my own experiences tells me that sunrises and sunsets take a huge range of hues and this can change from country to country too so adjust to how you see it or remember it but here it could be a little cool in the sky but it suits the water well.

Hope this helps
Phil

dmhuynh and pmorgan produced such amazing photos, I will surely try to get the CD from pmorgan.
Great thanks for your advices.
Thai

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thaiph
thaiph  2
21 Feb 2013 - 2:13 AM

Hi Phil,
I've just got the CD from Pmorgan site, that's truly what I was looking for for a long time.
Many thanks all constructive comments, advices and information where I should pay attention and improve.
Have a great day everyone!
Thai

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