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The Actress

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Photo also taken during a procession in one of our villages in Malta.

Brand:NIKON CORPORATION
Camera:Nikon D3000 Check out Nikon Nation!
Recording media:JPEG (digital)
Date Taken:22 Apr 2011 - 6:43 PM
Focal Length:270mm
Lens Max Aperture:f/5.7
Aperture:f/5.6
Shutter Speed:1/400sec
Exposure Comp:0.0
ISO:200
Exposure Mode:Manual
Metering Mode:Multi-segment
Flash:No Flash
Title:The Actress
Username:dusfim dusfim
Uploaded:6 Mar 2012 - 5:02 PM
Tags:Black & white, Portraits / people
VS Mode Rating 101 (100% won)
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Critque wantedCritique Wanted
Has Modifications Modifications Welcome (Upload a Modification)
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Comments

This photo is here for critique. Please only comment constructively and with suggestions on how to improve it.
saeidNL
saeidNL  5 Netherlands3 Constructive Critique Points
6 Mar 2012 - 5:25 PM

Fantastic work ,well done.
Saeid

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James_C
James_C  536 forum posts United Kingdom56 Constructive Critique Points
6 Mar 2012 - 5:49 PMConstructive Critique!This comment was flagged as constructive critique! 

A lovely picture that works very well in black and white. You have asked for critique though so:
There is a very distinct white line, particularly round the face, but also elsewhere, which indicates that you have been very heavyhanded with the sharpening. This feeling is enforced by the harsh white spots of light on the face and lips and the black and white speckles over much of the material. I suspect the photograph was quite sharp enough not to need this aggressive treatment.
The framing and exposure looks great so I wouldn't change that at all. With the exception of your last upload, this appears to be a new experiment in processing, which I personally don't like. It will be interesting to see what others have to say.

Kind regards,

James

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nonur
nonur e2 Member 5nonur vcard Turkey8 Constructive Critique Points
6 Mar 2012 - 6:06 PM

Wonderful work! Full of life.Smile

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Philo
Philo e2 Member 479 forum postsPhilo vcard England83 Constructive Critique Points
7 Mar 2012 - 9:24 PMConstructive Critique!This comment was flagged as constructive critique! 

Mario, you have the basis of a lovely portrait here and I think it would be very worthwhile revisiting your original image. The oversharpening is very apparent though. For portraits I sharpen after resizing but mask out the skin so that it stays smooth. Using high pass filter has a similar effect.
I have offered a mod with a slight increase in exposure, some cropped from the top to place the eyes closer to a third and then cleaned up the skin.
I hope you approve.
Phil

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DRicherby
DRicherby  6269 forum posts United Kingdom725 Constructive Critique Points
8 Mar 2012 - 11:59 AM

I've been trying to think of a way of saying this without sounding sexist but I'm not sure I can do it. Smile

Some men, like Clint Eastwood and your shepherd, have worn, wrinkly faces that make them look tough and masculine. Emphasizing those wrinkles by sharpening (being careful not to over-sharpen) makes for a dramatic, masculine photograph. Women, on the other hand, are rarely flattered by having imperfections in their skin emphasized. Some women spend a lot of time with make-up trying to hide such imperfections; other women aren't bothered but still won't thank you for drawing attention to their skin.

Some photographers would even go as far as to edit out any lumps or blemishes on a woman's skin, either by softening or airbrushing. That can create a somewhat artificial look and isn't very true to life, so you might not want to go that way for a general portrait such as this; after all, it's not a make-up advert. But it's still best not to sharpen the skin -- it's fine to leave the blemishes in but best not to actively emphasize them. She doesn't want to look like Clint Eastwood. Wink

Dave.

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