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Any advice on this would be greatly appreciated.....

Exposure time - 3.2
F22
Focal Length - 18mm
ISO 100

I tried this at a variety of exposure times with very limited success - the longer exposure I set, obviously the more light appeared in the shot, even with reducing the ISO setting to a minimum.

Any tips on taking these kind of shots properly? I'm new to experimenting with the settings of the camera and am just trying things on a trial and error basis. Any advice would be great, thanks in advance.

Scott

Camera:Canon EOS 350D
Lens:18 - 55
Title:WATERFALL
Username:ScottRobertson ScottRobertson
Uploaded:15 Oct 2006 - 11:04 AM
Tags:Landscape / travel, Waterfall
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This photo is here for critique. Please only comment constructively and with suggestions on how to improve it.
alyismad
alyismad  8 Wales
15 Oct 2006 - 11:10 AM

Hi Scott have had the same problem my self.

Went to Ystradfellte Waterfalls last night it was almost dark about, 6.30pm I could then use a slow shutter speed 30sec at f16 dont know if this is right or wrong.dull days are also good
also I use a grad fillter hope this helps

Ps you have done a much better job than me when I fist started keep up the good work

Steve

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ScottRobertson
15 Oct 2006 - 6:05 PM

Thanks for the info Steve

Scott

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oppo
oppo  8 Scotland2 Constructive Critique Points
15 Oct 2006 - 11:17 PM

This is well on it's way to being a good image Scott. The burn out at the top is the only distraction, but I think there was probably not much you could have done about it. Digital behaves a bit like slide film and is very unforgiving with over exposure. That's why I nearly always underexpose by anything up to one stop from the indicated meter reading. A grad. might have helped but judging by the spot of lens flare, I would have left it until the sky was less bright.

I hope some of that helps. I have encountered this problem a number of times myself. By the way keep on snapping...You are building up a great portfolio.

Regards ..Phil

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ScottRobertson
16 Oct 2006 - 7:42 AM

Thanks Phil, that is exactly the kind of feedback I am looking for.

Scott

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ljesmith
ljesmith  91092 forum posts United Kingdom
16 Oct 2006 - 4:05 PM

It's a good beginning, if you try cropping this to a vertical, taking of both sides of the shot so you have the waterfall a nd river you'll find it immediately makes it a stronger image. Also try going back on a duller day, flat lighting will take away some of your exposure problems and give you longer exposures to get the water effect you're after.

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WayneG
WayneG  8
16 Oct 2006 - 8:57 PM

I think that by changing the time of day you visit might put the sun behind you (sorry had to say it. Lol). If you can't then try a dark grey Grad. One other way is to take a reading of the lightest and darkest areas and bracket the exposure by 1/3rd or 1/2 stop around the middle reading. You will still have some areas a bit over exposed but it will be less exagerated.

Wayne

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ScottRobertson
16 Oct 2006 - 9:50 PM

Thanks Wayne, I'm probably going back up next week, I'll give it a go.
Cheers for the advice.

Scott

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Portknockie
22 Oct 2006 - 2:49 PM

Hi Scott..I think if you cropped it to the top of the falls the light would give this a magical feel to it...

DonSmile

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ScottRobertson
23 Oct 2006 - 3:17 PM

Thanks Don

Scott

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Sabreur
Sabreur  8767 forum posts England
10 Nov 2006 - 4:49 PM

Scott, I'd agree with the other comments that you have the foundations of a good image here. The composition is good, with foreground interest leading you towards the main falls.

A couple of things to consider for next time:

1. Cropping the top, or using ND grads, to remove the burnt out sky.
2. There is some flare. This might be some dust on your lens (which is more likely to show at small apertures) or might be due to the angle of the sun. As I assume that you don't have a lens hood, you could instead use a piece of card to shield the front element. You need to hold it so that it is out of the frame, but casts a shadow over the lens.

As Luke suggested, going back on a dull, overcast day can also help to smooth out the lighting.

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ScottRobertson
10 Nov 2006 - 6:04 PM

Thanks for the tips Robert, much appreciated. I feel my more recent ones have improved on a lot of the negatives. Thanks again for the tips.

Scott

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