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12/06/2014 - 10:04 PM

Mealy worms Please

Mealy worms PleaseGood focus on the eye; the catchlight adds sparkle to the image.
Maybe a smaller aperture would allow for more feather detail and a deeper depth of field - if you do this, you may have to increase the ISO to enable a faster shutter speed in order to avoid possible camera movement.
Regards,
Richard
17/10/2013 - 1:20 PM

THE GHOST OF MICHAEL JACKSON

THE GHOST OF MICHAEL JACKSONYou're always up for a challenge in the thirst for knowledge, Tish!
I'm really like your results (the motion blur adds so much to the whole holiday atmosphere), particularly as you hadn't taken this type of image before!Smile
I don't know quite how to follow the excellent advice that Pamela has given you!

When I take inside images with flash(external flash):-

1. I usually use aperture priority(f 8ish or the smallest I can get away with to get a reasonable depth of field - particularly when taking a two person portrait and I want both sets of eyes in focus).

2. Increase the ISO up to minimum 800( to try to achieve a shutter speed fast enough to avoid unwanted movement).

3. Set my flashgun to manual and experiment with the exposure levels on the flashgun to achieve as good an overall lighting effect as possible.

4. Take a few shots until I am happy with the results - a bit of trial and error in some respects but it does work.

I have to say that I do tend to use a tripod and, when I use the above method, it is usually for posed photographs - I also use the 10 second timer on the camera so I can make it on to the picture!!
Must get a wireless remote, sometime!

I know you probably wouldn't have had time to experiment in this circumstance but you could consider this approach for the future.
Pamela's White Balance advice is excellent and one I need to remember!!

Hope this is of some use to you, Tish!

Best wishes,

Richard
09/07/2013 - 8:24 AM

STAINED GLASS

STAINED GLASSA lovely image of one of my favourite subjects, Ken!
Just a minor point, have you tried experimenting with exposure compensation, maybe -1, when taking pictures of stained glass?
It can help reduce 'glare' from the backlighting.
Regards,
Richard
05/06/2013 - 11:57 PM

Unlimited ...

Unlimited ...What amazing images of these birds!
Why don't you experiment with the 300 mm end of this lens to get some more close up images?
You could then crop these to home in and obtain some more 'intimate' images, is that's the right way to explain it!
Close up work would be a good option, I think.
Regards,
richard
18/04/2013 - 11:31 AM

Different generations...

Different generations...I think you've got this photography lark 'off to a tee', Nathan!Wink
It's a great image, well thought out in your inimitably creative way!Smile
Having read the comments and critiques, maybe brighten it a little then use the magic wand tool to select
the areas that, perhaps, should be black and then fill with black to enable even colouring. You may need
to reduce the tolerance to avoid other blackish areas being picked up by the magic wand.
Hope your firing on all four cylinders soon,
Regards,
Richard
18/04/2013 - 9:14 AM

Five Silver Spoons

Five Silver SpoonsWhat beautifully crafted spoons, Kate!
Maybe present them radially, with the decorative part of the handles in the centre and view them from above?

Richard
16/03/2013 - 9:43 AM

Resting point...

Resting point...A great image of very restful looking place, Nathan.
It is tricky taking shots with inconsistent lighting.
Maybe experiment with + or and - on the exposure compensation.
I'd, maybe, set the exposure for the highlights and then lighten shadows when processing the image.
Just a thought!
Have a good day.

****
12/01/2013 - 9:57 PM

"I'm posing!"

"I'm posing!"Hi Ju,
I agree with Adrian regarding the sharpness. To rectify this, you could look in the 60D manual at:-
1. Focusing
AF point selection
select the centre point using the Quick Control Dial on the back of the camera.
2. You will also need to select 'Al Focus' or 'Al Servo'(refer to the manual index) in order to choose the best focusing mode for moving subjects. Al Focus may well be the better of the two for reasons explained in the manual.
Hopefully this will lead to sharper pictures similar to the one you have uploaded - and I do really like this picture!
I do hope I haven't complicated things!
I hope this helps - this advice(and I'm a fine one to offer advice!!) is sent with good wishes to you, Ju.
Best wishes,
****