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Flying High

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I took this shot in the back garden with my D90 & 18-105 lens. Although I'm quite happy with it this was the best out of about 100 shots. If anyone can give me any advice on improving or getting a higher percentage of reasonable shots please feel free comment. Critique also welcome.

Brand:NIKON CORPORATION
Camera:Nikon D90 Check out Nikon Nation!
Lens:18.0-105.0 mm f/3.5-5.6
Recording media:JPEG (digital)
Date Taken:15 Apr 2012 - 1:51 PM
Focal Length:105mm
Lens Max Aperture:f/5.7
Aperture:f/8.0
Shutter Speed:1/3200sec
Exposure Comp:-1/3
ISO:500
Exposure Mode:Aperture-priority AE
Metering Mode:Spot
Flash:No Flash
Title:Flying High
Username:JonnyNI JonnyNI
Uploaded:16 Apr 2012 - 5:13 PM
Tags:Bird, Blue, Flight, In, Tit, Wildlife / nature
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Votes:29

Comments

Eastlands
Eastlands e2 Member 4684 forum postsEastlands vcard Northern Ireland3 Constructive Critique Points
16 Apr 2012 - 5:41 PMConstructive Critique!This comment was flagged as constructive critique! 

Keep at it as this is a superb image, the good thing about digital is that you can fire off loads of shots and like the rest of us if you are lucky you might get one or two really good images. It is very difficult to keep all of the subject pin sharp but you have done very well to get detail throughout and wonderful capture of the wings. For wildlife photography you will probably need to consider a larger lens ( something like 70-200 mm or more ) which I know is not always easy as they can prove expensive but if you look around you might get something suitable, John.

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senn
senn e2 Member 3senn vcard Belgium1 Constructive Critique Points
16 Apr 2012 - 5:52 PM

excellent catch !..

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Fefe
Fefe e2 Member 3Fefe vcard United Kingdom30 Constructive Critique Points
16 Apr 2012 - 6:20 PM

Love the light in the wings, Great shot!
Diane

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saeidNL
saeidNL  5 Netherlands3 Constructive Critique Points
16 Apr 2012 - 6:25 PM

Excellent capture,very well done,
saeid

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ugly
ugly e2 Member 6ugly vcard United Kingdom56 Constructive Critique Points
16 Apr 2012 - 6:39 PM


Quote: Keep at it as this is a superb image, the good thing about digital is that you can fire off loads of shots and like the rest of us if you are lucky you might get one or two really good images. It is very difficult to keep all of the subject pin sharp but you have done very well to get detail throughout and wonderful capture of the wings. For wildlife photography you will probably need to consider a larger lens ( something like 70-200 mm or more ) which I know is not always easy as they can prove expensive but if you look around you might get something suitable, John.

A great image on the wings..

I agrre about lens...
I think you need a tad faster on shutter speed or pan with bird more..
The head has a little bit of movement in it that why it a little blur there..
You are over 75% there now just get out there and take lots more images...
Well done...

Dave

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JonnyNI
JonnyNI e2 Member 3716 forum postsJonnyNI vcard
17 Apr 2012 - 6:39 AM

Thanks very much for the comments everyone. As far as the lenses go I also have a 70-300 whiich I use for my ststic bird shots but when trying to catch them in flight I tend to rely on a shorter focal length and the crop tool. lol. Will spend a bit of time with the longer lens and see how things go. Thanks again for the advice guys.

Jonny

Last Modified By JonnyNI at 17 Apr 2012 - 6:39 AM

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M_squared
M_squared e2 Member 3M_squared vcard United Kingdom
17 Apr 2012 - 9:02 AM

Great image. Keep at it!

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DRicherby
DRicherby  6269 forum posts United Kingdom725 Constructive Critique Points
18 Apr 2012 - 9:43 AMConstructive Critique!This comment was flagged as constructive critique! 

This is a great attempt. In-flight shots are seriously hard: doubly so with small birds because they move so fast.

The problem with using a short-ish focal length and cropping is loss of resolution. To take a frame-filling shot of a small bird like this usually needs a lens in the 500mm range. Unless the bird was flying very close to you, your shot at 100mm has something like five times the width and five times the height. The area of interest is only a twenty-fifth of the frame so, when you crop down to that, your 12MP camera has suddenly become a 0.5MP camera. Resolution suffers, and quality with it: the blur on the head is almost certainly a resolution problem, possibly combined with the head being slightly out of focus. (But, at 105mm, f/8 should be giving you more than enough depth of field to get the whole bird sharp.)

How to improve? First, recognise that you're trying to do something extremely difficult and one good shot out of a hundred might not be so bad. The key to improvement is practise and I suggest you start with something easier. Larger birds fly more slowly so practise on gulls and pigeons until your hit-rate goes up. Pan with the bird, use tracking autofocus (Canon calls it "Servo AI" mode; I don't know about Nikon) and continuous shooting mode to take three or four shots at a time. Practise using longer focal lengths, which makes panning more difficult because you need to be more accurate. As your skills improve, try again with the smaller birds and you should get better, more consistent results. But this kind of stuff is always rather hit-and-miss so practise pressing that delete button, too! Smile

By the way, I think that "ugly" didn't notice you're already at 1/3200s and it's not possible to go much faster than that!

Dave.

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aeras
aeras  2 Cyprus6 Constructive Critique Points
18 Apr 2012 - 1:36 PM

Sometimes I feel I have a nice shot and then when I review it again after a couple of days I find things that I don't like. I totally agree with Dave , the subject moves quickly and it is too small for your 105 to reach.
Other than that the fact that the bird is showing its rear , and the legs show like that makes the picture less attractive.
I would try to catch such a bird with its wings up , coming towards me and not going away from me.
Of course is easy to comment on ones picture when you see it , and another when one tries actually to shoot it Smile

Take care

Charles

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hippysnapper
27 Apr 2014 - 8:11 PM

Lovely, have to agree with the experienced people here, as I'm notSmile But I do have a 100-500 Sigma lens for my Nikon D7000 - needing LOTS of practiceSmile

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