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Leaning Tower, Vertical Cathedral

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An experiment in free lensing with a Nikkor 18-55 at 22mm - f18 - 1/320. Apart from the sharpness not a bad result. Comment welcome.

Brand:NIKON CORPORATION
Camera:Nikon D90 Check out Nikon Nation!
Lens:AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55mm VR Check out Nikon Nation!
Recording media:RAW (digital)
Date Taken:7 Jul 2013 - 1:50 PM
Focal Length:18
Lens Max Aperture:f/22.0
Aperture:f/18.0
Shutter Speed:1/320sec
Exposure Comp:-1.0
ISO:250
Exposure Mode:Manual
Metering Mode:Center-weighted average
Flash:No Flash
White Balance:Auto
Title:Leaning Tower, Vertical Cathedral
Username:SkySkape SkySkape
Uploaded:15 Jul 2013 - 9:09 PM
Tags:Architecture, Digital art, Digitally manipulated, Landscape / travel, Specialist / abstract
VS Mode Rating 95 (27.78% won)
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Comments

This photo is here for critique. Please only comment constructively and with suggestions on how to improve it.
banehawi
banehawi Critique Team 9706 forum postsbanehawi vcard Canada2668 Constructive Critique Points
16 Jul 2013 - 12:08 AM

I think this is a difficult technique to master. I would think that the goal is to end up with a sort of tilt/shift result, with at least part of the image focused, - which is why you start out with the lens manually focused on infinity.


I dont see any evidence of these qualities here, just an underexposed and fuzzy shot. Have you tried this technique successfully previously?


You have a number of sensor spots upper right of frame.




regards



Willie

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paulbroad
paulbroad  681 forum posts United Kingdom825 Constructive Critique Points
16 Jul 2013 - 8:45 AM

Not even sure what free lensing is. Assume it's not attached to the camera and thus can be tilted. I'm afraid, if this is the result, I wouldn't bother. Not very constructive, but in a sense it is. My advice, constructively, is put a first class image on the sensor, work on it later.

Paul

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mrswoolybill
mrswoolybill Critique Team 7327 forum postsmrswoolybill vcard United Kingdom879 Constructive Critique Points
16 Jul 2013 - 9:59 AM

I've seen freelensing demonstrated, it makes my Lensbaby (which can be wiggled around at different angles but remains attached to the camera) seem quite boring by comparison. Full marks for experimenting. But there's no point in attempting it if you're not focusing and that will take a lot of practice. I know one photographer who reckoned it took him about a year to get it right.
And do remember that it's positively inviting dust into the camera body!
Moira

Last Modified By mrswoolybill at 16 Jul 2013 - 10:00 AM

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Davesumner
17 Jul 2013 - 5:48 AM

So am I right in assuming that from the comments above, you take the lens off your camera and hold it in front at an angle instead of it being attached to get some sort of tilt and shift result or am I totally wrong?

I have never heard of free lensing but, if I am right then stick to the perspective tool in Photoshop or invest in a tilt and shift lens if these are the results you getting.

Hot Update - I looked it up on Professor Google and I'm bang on. I would suggest that free lensing was invented by a sales executive from a camera company to get sales targets up on new cameras rather than for an actual realistic results. If you want my two penneth, frame your shot, zoom out to create more space around the subject and then go wild with the perspective tool. Photoshop is relatively cheap compared to replacing broken lenses and damaged sensors.

One thing that does puzzle me is that if you use tilt and shift or lensing to get the perspective right on buildings etc. why on earth would you test it on the Leaning Tower of Pisa that will only ever be straight when it falls over, which it will?

Thanks

DaVeS

Last Modified By Davesumner at 17 Jul 2013 - 5:50 AM

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mrswoolybill
mrswoolybill Critique Team 7327 forum postsmrswoolybill vcard United Kingdom879 Constructive Critique Points
17 Jul 2013 - 3:13 PM

Just as a footnote, I hope you know this classic by Martin Parr.

Last Modified By mrswoolybill at 17 Jul 2013 - 3:13 PM

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