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Canon EOS 800D Expert Review : Verdict



Canon EOS 800D (10)

Value For Money

The Canon EOS 800D is available for £869 with the 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM lens or £779 body only which makes it seem a little expensive when compared to the previous version, as the 750D had an RRP of £599 body only. There's also the option of spending £50 more for the 77D, which has additional controls and features. If you're looking for a lower-priced DSLR from Canon, then you have the choice of the 1300D, 700D, and 750D. The range then goes upwards to the 800D, 77D, and then the 80D, and on to the 7D Mark II at the top of the APS-C range.

Here's a quick run down of the options available from Canon and other manufacturers:

Canon EOS 77D, 24mp, 45 AF points, 6fps, top LCD, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, NFC, £829 body only
Canon EOS 750D, 24mp, 19 AF points, 5fps, Wi-Fi, NFC, £549 body only
Nikon D5600, 24mp, 39 AF points, 5fps, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, NFC, £699 body only
Pentax K-70, 24mp, 11 AF points, 6fps, Wi-Fi, in camera image stabilisation, weather-sealed, £599 body only
Sony Alpha A68, 24mp, (with EVF), 79 AF points, 5fps, top LCD, Wi-Fi, in camera image stabilisation, £549 body only

For mirrorless cameras, have a look here, with top alternatives being the Panasonic Lumix G80, Fujifilm X-T20Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II, and Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II. Have a look at more DSLR cameras Top 10 APS-C DSLRs. You'll also need to buy a memory card and a case or bag to keep your camera safe and protected - have a look at our complete guide to camera bags.

Canon EOS 800D Verdict

The Canon EOS 800D offers a significant upgrade to the 750D, and we’re pleasantly surprised by the improvements made in handling, design, and focus speeds, both in live view and normal shooting modes. Improvements have been made in continuous shooting speeds, as well as the ISO range available. There’s also a new user interface, making the camera easier to use for beginners. However, there’s still a lack of two command dials, something that really would be good to see (even on basic DSLRs), especially as a number of entry level mirrorless cameras (and compact cameras) offer dual controls.

If you’re an enthusiastic photographer and can see yourself wanting direct control over the shutter and aperture speeds in manual mode, then the 77D is going to be the camera you will want. However, this is a real shame, as the 77D is larger (and more expensive).

The 800D also feels quite expensive in comparison to the 750D (RRP) when introduced. However, it’s an big improvement over the 750D, and also offers an improved battery life, which will give many mirrorless cameras a run for its money. The camera also delivers great image quality, and with a wide range of affordable lenses, the 800D would make a great choice for any photographer.

Canon EOS 800D Pros

  • Significant updates since the 750D
  • White priority white balance (great for product shots)
  • Improved continuous shooting speed (6fps)
  • Improved battery life (600 shots)
  • Impressive Live view focus performance
  • Much improved handling, with a better grip and thinner body
  • Excellent image quality and colour
  • 45 AF points

Canon EOS 800D Cons

  • Strong crop with electronic IS (also softer)
  • Doesn't feature a front and back control wheel 
  • Price is a little high

Features5/5
Handling4.5/5
Performance4.5/5
Value3.5/5
Overall Verdict



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Photographs taken using the Canon EOS 800D

Scottish Borders Cyclist w/ Faux HDRa hungry Bird Model (2017) - job done w/in five minutes as it hops about along its own Bird-Walk @ Bank Street Galashiels SelkirkshireView of Walkerburn w/in the far background from the top of Caerlee HillView upon Woodend Bridge over-looking the Tweed near Cardrona, Scottish BordersAldwych Station

Comments


russellsnr 13 178 England
15 Feb 2017 10:21AM
Hi, Canon user for many years.
Why do Canon persist with the APS-C sensors? surley a FF sensor is now the way to go, I just wonder what people would say if offered a new APS-C sensor or an older sensor in the new body that offers the advantage of FF.
Yes I no APS-C sensors are cheaper to make but anyone no the difference in cost between the APS-C and the FF sensor in manufacture?
Russ

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themak 4 1.0k Scotland
15 Feb 2017 11:23AM

Quote:Why do Canon persist with the APS-C sensors? surley a FF sensor is now the way to go,

Strange question. They make a range of FF and APSC cameras. Who benefits if they stop APSC?
redhed17 12 835 England
15 Feb 2017 2:05PM

Quote:Hi, Canon user for many years.
Why do Canon persist with the APS-C sensors? surley a FF sensor is now the way to go, I just wonder what people would say if offered a new APS-C sensor or an older sensor in the new body that offers the advantage of FF.
Yes I no APS-C sensors are cheaper to make but anyone no the difference in cost between the APS-C and the FF sensor in manufacture?
Russ



You do know that every manufacturer sells way more crop sensor DSLRs than FF cameras don't you. Just because you seem not to need/want the benefits of a crop sensor camera doesn't mean that FF is for everyone. And the sales numbers seem to back this up. "Surley" a good job there is choice eh! Wink
alan53 10 United Kingdom
16 May 2017 10:46AM
“Why do Canon persist with the APS-C sensors?” You might as well ask why do Canon use FFsensors? There’s a market for both. Personally I find 24MP APS-C gives me what I need. So why would I want bigger, heavier, and more expensive? Go one model up from entry level and you’ll get most of the extras too.

Consumers want choices. Interestingly, Fujifilm chose to skip the FF market, and jump from APS-C to Medium Format for those that want better quality. All formats are compromises. There’s no perfect choice.
Canonshots 7 141 13 United Kingdom
17 May 2017 1:43PM

Quote:Hi, Canon user for many years.
Why do Canon persist with the APS-C sensors? surely a FF sensor is now the way to go, I just wonder what people would say if offered a new APS-C sensor or an older sensor in the new body that offers the advantage of FF.
Yes I no APS-C sensors are cheaper to make but anyone no the difference in cost between the APS-C and the FF sensor in manufacture?
Russ



Personally I am not interested in FF. If I were to buy an FF camera I would need a complete new collection of lenses, which would put even a low-priced DSLR way beyond my budget. Canon are obviously aware of the need to cater properly for their existing customer base.
17 May 2017 10:51PM
For those who do not have a seriously RAM loaded computer, working with Full Frame image files would be nearly impossible. The file sizes on my full frame camera are in RAW over 90 megapixels!
It makes neither sense nor is it practical to eliminate a perfectly viable smaller sensor which is overkill for the caste numbers of photo users who are just as likely to use their smart phone to take pictures otherwise. I have both formats, full and APSc and use them both. They each have advantages. When I first obtained an APSc I thought it was a dead end and eventually all digital cameras would head to a full frame when prices dropped which they never did. The APSc became the popular standard for SLRs and the full frame strictly for professional use. It makes sense. Surely 24 megapixels is more than sufficient for general use and makes for decent print sizes for nearly all uses. They get better and better. The format war so to speak is done and APSc is the winner and now with Canon finally adding electronic Image stabilization they have all the advantages of the tiny compromised sub APS c formats as well. Mirrorless might be the next step of course for those that choose that but in principle the sensor issue is the big one and not mirror vs no mirror. There are millions of lenses out there and people are not about to toss them for yet a new format. I suggest more to the point is a set of FAST Focussing lens adapters for mirrorless cameras. That would be excellent for all that glass out there.
ThomasT 4 2 United Kingdom
18 May 2017 2:49AM
According to pro Ken R, these smaller sensors today are so good that unless you're a pro blowing up to mural size.. you won't see the diff. In any case, having finally just gone from Fuji Velvia/Leica to digital.. it made much sense to get the smaller sensor camera. For the same price as just the body of the Canon 800D, I picked up a mint camera and with it.... a fixed 24.f2/8-1600 f4 Leica optic!! It's the Lumix FZ1000. Results are stunning, close to velvia 50, with setting at Vivid X5 and an 81B filter..

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