Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


Christmas Prize Draw 2017

Fujifilm X-T20 Expert Review

Fujifilm X-T20 Expert Review - We review the Fujifilm X-T20, like the mini X-T2, it offers almost all of the same features, including a 24mp sensor and 4K video, but at a lower price. But how does it perform?

 Add Comment

Fujifilm X-T20 in Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera



Fujifilm X T20 Silver (3)

The Fujifilm X-T20 is a mirrorless camera that updates the X-T10 and comes equipped with a tilting LCD touchscreen, a new 24.3-megapixel sensor and 4K video. It actually shares a lot of the high-spec features from the X-T2, including the same sensor and 4K video recording at 100mbps, although the X-T2 supports up to 30 minutes of video whereas the X-T20 recording time is limited. The X-T20 is available in black and silver at £799 body only, £899 for a kit with XC16-50mm lens and £1099 for a kit with the XF18-55mm lens. 

Fujifilm X-T20 Features

Fujifilm X T20 Silver Black (1)

The Fujifilm X-T20 offers the 24.3 megapixel APS-C X-Trans CMOS III sensor, as used in the X-T2 and X-Pro2, which means the camera offers an ISO range from ISO100 to ISO51200, as well as offering 4K video recording, and improved AF points with 91 AF points - 49 of these are phase detection focus points, built-in to the sensor.

The X-T20 has classic SLR styling, particularly in silver and black, and on the back you'll find the camera's electronic viewfinder (EVF), as well as a 3inch tilting touch-screen. The electronic viewfinder features a high resolution of 2.36m dots, and 0.62x magnification, as well as an eye-sensor so that the camera can tell when you are holding the camera up to your face. This means the camera will automatically switch between the EVF and screen when needed. 

Fujifilm X-T20 Updates vs the X-T10: 

  • 24.3mp sensor vs 16.3mp sensor
  • 4K video recording vs FullHD video recording
  • Improved AF performance
  • 91 AF points vs 49 AF points
  • 3inch 1040K dot touch-screen vs 3inch 920K dot screen
  • New ACROS film simulation mode
  • New Video position on drive dial

The camera offers full manual controls, as well as an easy Auto mode switch, making it suitable for both beginners and the more advanced photographers. For high-speed shooting, the camera offers 8fps continuous shooting, with reduced blackout, and shutter speeds up to 1/32000s using an electronic shutter or 1/4000s using the mechanical shutter. There's also the option to shoot at 14fps using the electronic shutter.

Along with Fujifilm's film simulation which includes Fujifilm's classic films, such as Provia, Velvia, Astia, the camera offers Classic Chrome, and ACROS - a new black and white mode, giving a total of 15 film simulation modes. There's also the option to use "Grain effect", with off, weak and strong being the settings available. 

The camera includes 4K (UHD resolution) video recording for up to 10 minutes. There's also interval timer shooting built-in, as well as bracketing and multiple exposure options. In camera raw processing makes it easy to adjust settings without having to download to your PC or smartphone first.

Built-in Wi-Fi gives a number of additional functions, including Geotagging, letting you add GPS location data to images. You can transfer images or shoot remotely, controlling the camera from your smartphone. There's also PC Autosave for easy back-up of images, plus support for Instax printer printing.

Fujifilm X-T20 Vs the X-T2:

  • 1/4000s mechanical shutter speed on X-T20, vs 1/8000s on X-T2
  • 0.62x 2.36m dot EVF on X-T20, vs 0.77x 2.36m dot EVF on X-T2
  • 60fps EVF refresh, vs 100fps on X-T2
  • Tilting touch-screen on X-T20 vs a 3-way tilting screen on the X-T2
  • Both shoot at 8fps using a mechanical shutter (X-T2 offers 11fps with battery grip)
  • 3fps liveview shooting, vs 5fps liveview shooting on X-T2
  • 4K, 30fps video limited to 10mins on X-T20, vs 30mins (and F-Log) on X-T2
  • UHS I on X-T20 vs Dual UHS II on X-T2
  • Weather sealed body on X-T2
  • Optional battery grip for X-T2

Fujifilm X T20 Silver (1)

Key Features

  • 24.3 megapixel APS-C X-TRANS CMOS sensor
  • Fujifilm X Mount
  • 91 AF points (up to 325 points)
  • 3inch tilting touch-screen, 1040K dots
  • Electronic ViewFinder (EVF), 2.36m dot, 0.62x magnification
  • 4K UHD video recording (10 minute limit)
  • ISO100 to ISO51200
  • 8fps continuous shooting
  • ACROS film mode
  • HDR / panoramic shooting
  • Available in silver/black or all-black

Fujifilm X-T20 Handling

Fujifilm Xt20 Top Lighter

The X-T20 is smaller than the X-T2, but still has a premium build quality, with top and bottom plates made out of die-case magnesium alloy, as well as aluminium dials, making the camera feel good to use. The quality of lenses available also feel good, with solid construction, and most of them featuring metal barrels. The camera isn't weather-sealed, unlike the X-T2.

The design has barely changed since the X-T10, and the camera keeps the same rubber grip at the front, as well as the large thumb grip on the back. This makes the camera feel good to hold. However, one of the function buttons has been removed from the back of the camera, and there is now a top function button. The drive dial now has a video option making it quicker to switch from shooting stills to video. 

The camera has full manual controls, with shutter and aperture dials, plus an exposure compensation dial. With front and rear control dials, as well as direct manual controls, the camera is intuitive to use, and is a pleasing experience, feeling like a true photographers camera, rather than an electronic box of tricks. A switch can put the camera into Auto mode so that even if you've somehow got the camera settings wrong, you can still take photos, and let the camera work out the settings for correct exposure. 

The X-T20 has a very similar appearance to the X-T10 and those who are fans of the retro-styling many manufacturers are now using won't be disappointed. 

Fujifilm X T20 Rear

The X-T20 is responsive, focus is quick and the tilting LCD touchscreen makes it easy to set the focus point. Alternatively, you can switch this feature off if you'd prefer not to use it. The viewfinder looks good and the colours match those seen on the LCD screen, although if you've used the X-T2 or X-Pro2, then you may find the viewfinder a little small in comparison. If you haven't, then the viewfinder will seem perfectly fine.  

Inside the X-T20, the AF algorithm has had a rework so the camera tracks subjects much more easily and the camera starts up quicker, too. AF features phase-detection in the central 40% of the sensor (with 49 phase-detection focus points), and there are a total of 91 focus points normally, which can be expanded to 325. There are also the same continuous AF case types, as found on the X-T2.

Fujifilm X T20 Silver (2)

Menus – The X-T20 features the recently updated menu system, and the layout of options and controls is logical, with each main set of options kept in it's own section. There's also a "MyMenu" section, where you can store your favourite settings. The Q button gives quick access to some of the most common settings, on the rear screen.

Wi-Fi features - Using Fujifilm's Remote Camera app, available for iOS and Android devices, you can remotely control and shoot with the camera as well as start/stop video recording. You can select photos to transfer to the smartphone or tablet, or receive photos sent from the camera. In addition, you can use the app to add GPS / geotagging information to photos. The app is quite easy to use and has a good level of options when shooting remotely. 

Fujifilm X T20 Silver Black (8)

Battery life - Battery life is rated at 350 shots according to Fujifilm / CIPA test results, which is average for a mirrorless class of camera, and we'd recommend a spare battery if you plan on shooting more. The memory card and battery compartment can be found underneath next to the tripod socket, which is not centrally aligned - due to the position of the tripod socket you'll need to take the camera off your tripod mount if you want to change the memory card or battery.



Join ePHOTOzine and remove these ads.

Explore More

Photographs taken using the Fujifilm X-T20

Compare.Eye effect.Female Red Deer.The Anglers.Evening.Female House sparrow in dappled lighting.From the Crooked BookGreenfinch gorging on Rose Hip seeds.Crooked Book music afternoonoXFORD bUSESSilhouettes.Big Mouth!Duelling Robots...Twisting the night away...Where is that cat?

Comments


josa 5 25 Czech Republic
2 Jun 2017 8:14PM
Beautiful camera, if only it had Bayer sensor...

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

redhed17 12 835 England
6 Jun 2017 11:11PM
I have to disagree that the X-T20 is intuitive to use. I've had SLRs for 30+ years, DSLR's and various compact cameras for almost 15 years. I've also had lots of different cameras come into Photography classes over the last ten years, and when somebody brought a X-T20 into a class a couple of months ago, asking me how to use the Aperture Priority 'mode', it had me stumped. I downloaded the manual, and was still stumped. All the mentions of Aperture Priority in the manual point to setting a button on the lens, (unless I missed something) which the lens the owner of the X-T20 didn't have. Sad I think if memory serves, I had to press one of the adjustable wheels to activate the Aperture, whilst the Shutter set to A (Auto) to be able to adjust it. I found that by trial and error, as I found the manual very poor. Some may find it easy to use, I, and the owner of the X-T20 did not.
ThomasT 4 2 United Kingdom
7 Jun 2017 12:29PM
Josa.. I reckon I get the same color as the Bayer sensor, or even the Foveon.. in fact very close to fuji velvia 50 which i just gave up to go digits for the 1st time. Lumix FZ1000, setting vivid MAX and 81B warming filter. Heck for my 600$ I got a mint one from KEH. It has a Leica 24mm f2.8 to 1600mm F4(!!!) lens..at just over one pound weight!
themak 4 1.0k Scotland
11 Jun 2017 2:18PM

Quote:how to use the Aperture Priority 'mode', it had me stumped. I downloaded the manual, and was still stumped. All the mentions of Aperture Priority in the manual point to setting a button on the lens, (unless I missed something) which the lens the owner of the X-T20 didn't have

If the lens had no switch, it must have had an aperture ring with an A for Auto and full range of manual aperture settings just like your old-school SLR lenses. No button pushes are necessary as there is no AP mode as such. Alternatively, if the lens had an aperture switch - when it's set to manual, aperture is set using the thumbwheel on the back of the camera - again no additional button pushes necessary. It's logical, but the user needs to get away from the idea that PASM is the only way to do things.
13 Jun 2017 1:51AM
I miss Fuji Velvia film. What a joy to spill out the transparencies onto the light table to see what exciting images awaited me.
redhed17 12 835 England
13 Jun 2017 11:01PM

Quote:If the lens had no switch, it must have had an aperture ring with an A for Auto and full range of manual aperture settings just like your old-school SLR lenses.
It didn't.


Quote:Alternatively, if the lens had an aperture switch - when it's set to manual, aperture is set using the thumbwheel on the back of the camera - again no additional button pushes necessary.
I could find nowhere in the manual where it said this. :-/ All mentions of the Aperture Priority Mode were demonstrated with a picture of a switch being changed on the lens, which the camera I was using did not have. It also had no manual control of Aperture on the lens.


Quote:It's logical, but the user needs to get away from the idea that PASM is the only way to do things.
It may seem logical to you to not work the same way as almost every (D)SLRs and many types of digital camera, and away from all the mentions of the A, S and M modes in the manual, but not to me. :-/ In this case, logical to me is very similar to what is the prevailing method in common use, or is pretty easy for a layman to work out without recourse to manuals or guides. I don't believe this camera is. YVMV. Smile I would advise anyone to try before they buy. Wink
themak 4 1.0k Scotland
14 Jun 2017 12:46AM
Again, you're still talking about modes. The manual doesn't mention modes because there are none - aperture is auto or manual, shutter is auto or manual (as is sensitivity). 'Modes' are just permutations of these settings. If PASM was all that irrefutably logical, auto/manual ISO would also be included, when the number of modes would be unmanageable.
themak 4 1.0k Scotland
14 Jun 2017 12:22PM

Quote:All mentions of the Aperture Priority Mode were demonstrated with a picture of a switch being changed on the lens, which the camera I was using did not have. It also had no manual control of Aperture on the lens.

I'm not aware of any lenses for Fuji X that have neither.
joshwa Plus
7 826 United Kingdom
14 Jun 2017 12:35PM
themak 4 1.0k Scotland
14 Jun 2017 12:46PM
Must be that, then. So how is auto or manual aperture chosen?
redhed17 12 835 England
14 Jun 2017 9:54PM

Quote:Again, you're still talking about modes. The manual doesn't mention modes because there are none - aperture is auto or manual, shutter is auto or manual (as is sensitivity). 'Modes' are just permutations of these settings. If PASM was all that irrefutably logical, auto/manual ISO would also be included, when the number of modes would be unmanageable.

You have seen the manual haven't you? Page 'x' of the Introduction in the manual, Section 5.
Choosing a Shooting Mode.....62
Mode P: Program AE.....62
Mode S: Shutter-Priority AE.....64
Mode A: Aperture-Priority AE.....69
Mode M: Manual Exposure.....72
Auto Mode.....74

The way Fuji have designed the user interface is not logical to me, or to the owner of the camera I was looking at. Reading the manual didn't make it clearer either with the constant reference to a switch on the lens for 'Aperture Priority', which the camera I was using didn't have.

I have been using cameras for over 30 years. I have been teaching Digital Camera / Photography classes for about 10 years, so have seen quite a few different types of camera, and imho the user interface of this camera is not logical or intuitive. YVMV, which is fine. Smile And the manual is very poor imho.

redhed17 12 835 England
14 Jun 2017 10:01PM

Quote:Must be that, then. So how is auto or manual aperture chosen?

You should know, it's logical. Wink

Seriously, if memory serves, the Shutter Speed dial is set to 'S', and I had to press one of the Command Dials to activate that dial, highlighting an 'A' on the screen/viewfinder, to adjust the aperture. I may be wrong though, it was about 2 months ago that I last touched the camera.
themak 4 1.0k Scotland
14 Jun 2017 10:48PM

Quote:
Quote:Must be that, then. So how is auto or manual aperture chosen?


You should know, it's logical. Wink


Clearly from the above I was unaware of the lack of switching on these entry-level lenses, and the manual appears to ignore them as well - the test linked to above doesn't say either, hence the question - not aimed at you.
I've been using these cameras with a number of lenses for 2 years now and had no difficulty adapting to the lack of PASM dial, but those XF lenses have either switch or aperture ring.
I agree the manual is deficient if it doesn't account for these XC lenses, particularly as the 16-50 is sold as kit lens with the X-T20 - maybe it's in the lens manual.
I own one and I am very happy with it so far. I have been experimenting with the various modes, and they all work fine.... The only problem is some of the documentation on the Manual is not complete. I will tell you all exactly how to switch to Aperture Priority (A) and Shutter Priority (S) which is not clearly explained in the manual.

First, my X-T20 came with two kit lenses (XC ) that don't have an aperture ring on the lens. So, you don't do anything to the lens when switching to the A or S mode.
Go to the manual:--> Mode A: Aperture-Priority AE.....69. follow the instructions. Disregard the Lens settings if you have the XC lenses. Now when you have the camera on, the display will show Program(P) or (A) Mode on the bottom of the display. If it says A, then you are on Aperture mode and you can change your F stops by moving the FRONT command dial. If it says Program (P), as soon as you move the front command dial to change the F stops (aperture), it will change to Aperture Mode (A). To switch back to Program Mode P, you need to stop down to the highest F stop, and then with one more click on the front command dial you will be on the Lowest F stop, and the camera will change to the Program Mode(P)

I hope that helps

Actually setting the camera to Shutter Priority (S) is also a little tricky as well depending on what mode you were before. Let me know if you need help



Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.