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Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III Full Review - Verdict

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Olympus OM D E M10 Mark III (11)

Value For Money

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III is available for £629 body only. This makes it quite good value value for money. Alternatives to look at include the following:

Fujifilm X-T20, 24mp, 4K video, 8fps, £795 body only
Panasonic Lumix G80, 16mp, 4K video, 9fps, £629 body only
Canon EOS M5, 24mp, FullHD video, 9fps, £999 body only
Sony Alpha A6000, 24mp, FullHD video, 11fps, £425 body only
Sony Alpha A6300, 24mp, 4K video, 11fps, £829 body only

And you could also look at the Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II if you don’t need 4K video, which is available for £569 with 14-42mm EZ lens. Have a look at more options in the Best Premium Mirrorless Cameras (EVF), or have a look at the Best Entry-Level Mirrorless Cameras (may have EVF). You'll also need to buy a memory card and a case or bag to keep your camera safe and protected - have a look at our complete guide to camera bags.


Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III Verdict

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III looks like a subtle update to the E-M10 Mark II, however, it adds 4K video, and makes using some of the modes easier, with a new, more user friendly interface. The first screen you see when you select a mode, is very clear and easy to use, with pictures showing you the modes, however, the menu system is still not the easiest to use, even though it has had a refresh. 

The mode and control dials have been improved, as well as providing quicker access to ISO/flash/drive/focus options on the 4-way controller. Dual command dials make it easy to change shutter or aperture speeds, or both, as well as giving quick access to exposure compensation, without having to press another button first (depending what mode you're shooting in). The improved grip gives the camera improved ergonomics, and the change to a MicroUSB connector rather than Olympus' proprietary connection is welcome. 

The Mark III is easier to use for beginners and those looking for an entry-level SLR-like mirrorless camera, and there are a number of unique shooting modes in the Advanced Photo mode. If you're an E-M5 Mark II or E-M10 Mark II user, then the Mark III isn't really aimed at you. If you have the original OM-D E-M10 and are looking to upgrade, then, depending on your needs, the Mark II may be a better choice, particularly if you don’t need 4K video. Unfortunately the number of customisable buttons has been decreased. The quick sleep option from the Mark II is no longer available, and other settings from the Mark II are no longer available.

The OM-D E-M10 Mark III delivers high image quality, with excellent colour reproduction, and good levels of detail. Noise is well controlled, and shooting at higher ISO speeds isn’t as much of an issue as it used to be on earlier Micro Four Thirds cameras. For those that want more controls, the E-M5 Mark II is a great choice, but for those that want a relatively easy to use camera, with good image quality and 4K video recording the E-M10 Mark III would make a good choice. Sure, it’s not necessarily going to please those wanting to upgrade from a Mark II, but for everyone else, this is a competitive camera that has a good range of features and delivers great images.

It’s also worth pointing out how effective the 5-axis image stabilisation is at making your videos look good, even when recording handheld. This makes it possible to record video without having to carry a tripod with you everywhere you go. If you look at this camera, on it's own, then it offers a competitive set of features, high image quality, and some unique shooting modes, along with 5-axis IS and 4K video recording.

Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III Pros

  • 4K video recording
  • Excellent colour reproduction
  • Good noise performance
  • 5-axis image stabilisation
  • 3inch tilting touch-screen
  • High resolution electronic viewfinder (EVF)
  • Improved dials and larger grip
  • Huge range of Micro Four Thirds lenses
  • Dual-axis electronic level
  • MicroUSB connection

Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III Cons

  • Reduced number of customisable buttons
  • Plastic camera body (compared to metal on Mark II)
  • Wireless flash control removed (was on Mark II)
  • Feels like a downgrade from the Mark II in some areas
  • Occasional shutter shock (can be avoided with anti-shock)

Features5/5
Handling4.5/5
Performance4.5/5
Value4/5
Overall Verdict


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Photographs taken using the Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III

rose close upBoat in BlueThe BoatCromer Pier in b&wanother roseSteps over the groynesCromer Pier with filterRhododendron flower using focus mergeThorham tree stumpsCacti FlowerThorham Boat shedYellow DaffLEAFSSnowdrops

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Comments


Flymoman 7 2 United Kingdom
14 Sep 2017 8:17PM
Much as I love ephotozine I'm beginning to get a bit frustrated with the camera reviews I've read recently. No mention again of the auto focus performance. I was really looking forward to seeing if this had been improved. Having said that I'll definitely be skipping this model. A real backwards step for the em10. Plastic body and less customisation. Small cameras are not just for beginners.
joshwa Plus
10 923 1 United Kingdom
15 Sep 2017 8:03AM

Quote:Much as I love ephotozine I'm beginning to get a bit frustrated with the camera reviews I've read recently. No mention again of the auto focus performance. I was really looking forward to seeing if this had been improved. Having said that I'll definitely be skipping this model. A real backwards step for the em10. Plastic body and less customisation. Small cameras are not just for beginners.


Hi,

On the first page you'll find:
"The focus system uses contrast detection AF, which means it can struggle more in low-light, however, in good light the focus speeds are rapid."

On the second page:
After the performance tests, showing the focus speeds for wide and telephoto:
"Tested with the 14-42mm EZ Pancake lens, focus is extremely quick in good light, and shutter response is excellent."

and
"Focus is reliable and quick, although can struggle in low-light conditions."

The speed of focus was measured to be ever so slightly quicker than when we tested the OM-D E-M10 Mark II, but the focus system is the same, and the camera still struggles in low-light, when compared to other cameras with phase detection focus systems.

Hope this helps
Josh
Greynerd 1 2
21 Sep 2019 11:44AM
You have to wonder if this camera is being positioned against the up coming EM5 Mk III as an automated basic device.
I have an E-PL9 and the lack of control of WB with Electronic shutter is a major problem. The WB also seems to be stuck in a boosted keep Warm Mode and is very different to what you see in auto mode or P mode.
I think for use in somewhere like a museum where you may want silent shutter the camera will be virtually useless.
Greynerd 1 2
21 Sep 2019 11:48AM
I would add to my comment automated but not well implemented. Possibly this new menu structure needs to settle down and a firmware update needed rather urgently.

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