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Panasonic Lumix S1R (Lumix S1) Hands-On Preview - Performance

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Panasonic Lumix S1R Performance

We have so far only had a few hours with a pre-production version of the S1R, but early indications are very promising indeed.

Autofocusing does a good job of locking onto the subject quickly, and with the new autofocus modes, it’s also easier to ensure that specific subjects are sharply in focus. In low light conditions, the camera coped well with little hunting to acquire focus, too. This is something we’ll be looking forward to testing in greater depth when a full production sample becomes available.


A new High-Resolution mode can shoot at 187 megapixels for the S1R or 96 megapixels for the S1. Essentially, it works by shooting 8 different frames, each with the sensor shifted slightly. These are then merged together for ultra high detail – you need to use a tripod for the mode, but the mode is easy to activate and use – you can find it in the main menu.  

In terms of image quality – it’s not possible to pass a full judgement at this stage, but detail seems to be very impressive, while colours are rendered well with a pleasing degree of saturation. Dynamic range appears to be fairly broad while shooting at high ISOs produces pleasingly smooth images.

Again, this is something we’ll be very keen to test further when full production samples become available and we can really put it through its paces. 

 

Panasonic LUMIX S1R Sample Photos

Note: The sample photos above were captured with a pre-production model of the Lumix S1R, image quality is not final.

 

Panasonic LUMIX S1R ISO test images

 

Panasonic LUMIX S1R White-balance test images

 

 

Panasonic Lumix S1R Early Verdict 

Full-frame mirrorless cameras are the big buzzword of the moment. Panasonic, once keen to push Micro Four Thirds as the mount of choice for its convenient size and lightweight has now joined the party with a comparatively big, bulky offering that might seem a little bit surprising to some.

Convincing people to switch to Panasonic from other brands such as Sony might be tricky, but, for those who are on the point of abandoning DSLRs, it’s a much easier sell that makes a lot of sense.

With an intriguing spec sheet and great handling, we can see it being a popular choice, and certainly, one to consider for those who don’t find the small bodies of the Sony Alpha system and the Nikon Z range altogether appealing.

It’s interesting to see Panasonic take this direction, and it’ll be intriguing to find out how many professional photographers are drawn towards the new system – look out for a full review in due course.

We will, of course, bring you our full opinion on the new Panasonic Lumix S1R and S1 once our reviews are complete but for now, have a look at the sample images and hands-on photos we've captured. We also have a comparison table so you can compare the specs of the S1 and S1R side-by-side. 

Other full-frame mirrorless cameras recently released include the Canon EOS R and the Nikon Z7 and Z6 cameras which you can find more information on in our 'Top 11 Best Full-Frame Mirrorless Cameras List'. In comparison, the Z6 is currently available on Amazon UK (as a kit) for £2699, the Z7 is priced at £3417 and the Canon EOS R is available as a kit for £3239 which puts them, roughly, in the same price bracket as the new Panasonic Lumix S1 and S1R.  

 

Panasonic LUMIX S1R Hands-On Photos of Equipment


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Comments


banehawi Plus
15 2.2k 4050 Canada
1 Feb 2019 3:02PM
Coincidentally, the Olympus CEO stated this week that sensor size is not the answer.

Seems the m4/3 alliance is crumbling.

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ricohflex 6 1
2 Feb 2019 4:41AM
In 1989 you could buy a 340MB hard disk for USD$ 1,800.
Now in 2019 you can get a Samsung 2TB 970 EVO NVMe M.2 Internal SSD for USD$500.
In 1980 you could buy a PC with 5 inch floppy drives.
In 2019 you cannot buy a PC with 5 inch floppy drives, even if you want to.
As technology improves and price differentials between formats drop and old formats die.
Due to the need to streamline manufacturing processes, manufacturers need to consolidate the production lines to make the format that SELLS. The format that 95% of the mass market consumers want.
That is why even in the film negative days, the old odd formats like 110, 126, 127, 220, photo disc and the fiasco APS (championed by Kodak, Fujifilm, Minolta, Nikon, Canon in 1996) fell by the wayside - long before the death of film.
Lumix can see the death of Micro4/3 format coming. It is not because the M4/3 is no good.
It is because other competing formats (full frame) are better and now have become cheap and affordable.
The stark message is that in future full frame will become even more cheap and affordable.
Manufacturers follow what the consumers want.
Manufacturers cannot stake their company's future on the few odd professionals who insist they love Micro4/3 but who represent only 0.0001% of the camera market.
2 Feb 2019 12:17PM
@ricohflex: Well, that's a rather long-winded way of saying: "Hi there, my name is Nostradamus" Wink

This new Pana camera is anything but "cheap and affordable", BTW.
ShaunsPics 8 87 United Kingdom
3 Feb 2019 9:09AM
at these prices no wonder pound shops do well. to save wear and tear on my D500 I think ill buy a couple of d3500 so I don't have to keep changing lenses.
6 Feb 2019 12:15PM

Quote:In 1989 you could buy a 340MB hard disk for USD$ 1,800.
Now in 2019 you can get a Samsung 2TB 970 EVO NVMe M.2 Internal SSD for USD$500.
In 1980 you could buy a PC with 5 inch floppy drives.
In 2019 you cannot buy a PC with 5 inch floppy drives, even if you want to.
As technology improves and price differentials between formats drop and old formats die.
Due to the need to streamline manufacturing processes, manufacturers need to consolidate the production lines to make the format that SELLS. The format that 95% of the mass market consumers want.
That is why even in the film negative days, the old odd formats like 110, 126, 127, 220, photo disc and the fiasco APS (championed by Kodak, Fujifilm, Minolta, Nikon, Canon in 1996) fell by the wayside - long before the death of film.
Lumix can see the death of Micro4/3 format coming. It is not because the M4/3 is no good.
It is because other competing formats (full frame) are better and now have become cheap and affordable.
The stark message is that in future full frame will become even more cheap and affordable.
Manufacturers follow what the consumers want.
Manufacturers cannot stake their company's future on the few odd professionals who insist they love Micro4/3 but who represent only 0.0001% of the camera market.

6 Feb 2019 12:17PM
Full-frame is taking a life-time to become 'cheap and affordable' - that's why I've an EOS 7D and not an EOS 5D!
ElSid 11 11 United Kingdom
11 Feb 2019 5:22PM
2299 for a 50mm lens! Not what I'd call 'cheap & affordable', not sure I'd call it justifiable either...
As a photograph taker and a guitar player, I can see similarities in attitudes,expectations realistic and fantastic. As a guitar player: when I was younger, I used to think that if only I had a Gibson or a Fender, I'd be able to play so much better. When I played more expensive guitars, I wasn't any better.

As a photograph taker; i started on a 1974 Zenit E. An inexpensive camera which took a lot of time to get a decent shot, but when it did, it was very satisfying. Then I got a Pentax ME Super, and to cut it short, I would still be using it regularly today if digital hadn't come along. I don't honestly think my pictures today would be any better than if I'd forked out a couple of thousand on a body the same for a lens or two. It's not going to make you a better photographer. If you can't frame a shot, or compose it properly, or press the shutter at the right moment, spending large sums of cash isn't going to make THAT much difference.

I'm now a pretty good guitar player, which is down to hard graft and practise. I've never spent more than 250 on a guitar. If anyone cares to look at my portfolio and say that by spending a lot more, I'd have got FAR better results, then I would be interested to hear from them.
8 May 2019 11:40PM
Yesss!!. Why I sold all of my full frame 35mm stuff many years ago was because I got fed up of lugging around kilogrammes of lenses in a big ruksack.
Nothing has changed. Now you have to lug around the same huge lenses and the same big body except it is a 47 megapixel digital camera.
That is why I bought a micro four thirds camera and lenses and why I will never go back to a full frame digital camera. AND that is why micro four thirds will continue to satisfy people like me.

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