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Tamron 35-150mm f/2.8-4 Di VC OSD (A047) Review - Performance

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Tamron 35-150mm f/2.8-4 Di VC OSD Performance

At 35mm, central sharpness is excellent from f/2.8 to f/8 and very good at f/11 and f/16. The edges are very good all through the range of apertures, rising to excellent at f/8.

At 50mm, central sharpness is excellent from f/3.2 to f/11 and very good at f/16 and f/18. The edges are good at f/3.2, excellent from f/4 through to f/8, very good at f/11 and f/16 and good at f/18.


At 105mm, central sharpness is excellent from f/4 to f/8. very good at f/11 and f/16 and good at f/20. The edges are good at f/4, very good from f/5.6 to f/16 and good at f/20.

At 150mm, central sharpness is excellent from f/4 to f/8, very good at f/11 and f/16, falling to just fair at f/22. The edges are good at f/4, very good from f/5.6 to f/11, good at f/16 and fair at f/22.

This is a very commendable performance, especially as the sharpness is well maintained all the way through the focal lengths.

 

Tamron 35-150mm f/2.8-4 Di VC OSD MTF Charts

How to read our MTF charts

The blue column represents readings from the centre of the picture frame at the various apertures and the green is from the edges.

The scale on the left side is an indication of actual image resolution and sharpness as LW/PH and is described in detail above. The taller the column, the better the lens performance.

For this review, the lens was tested on a Canon EOS 5DS R using Imatest. Want to know more about how we review lenses?

 

CA (Chromatic Aberration) is virtually banished centrally, all the way through the zoom range. The edges show minimal fringing and are especially well controlled around the 105mm point. There is no real sign of colour fringing in even quite demanding subject matter, but in any event it can be tackled in software if required.

 

Tamron 35-150mm f/2.8-4 Di VC OSD Chromatic Aberration Charts

How to read our CA charts

Chromatic aberration (CA) is the lens' inability to focus on the sensor or film all colours of visible light at the same point. Severe chromatic aberration gives a noticeable fringing or a halo effect around sharp edges within the picture. It can be cured in software.

Apochromatic lenses have special lens elements (aspheric, extra-low dispersion etc) to minimize the problem, hence they usually cost more.

For this review, the lens was tested on a Canon EOS 5DS R using Imatest.

 

At 35mm, we find -2.0% barrel distortion, this changing as we zoom in to pincushion distortion that measures +1.0% at 50mm, +1.98% at 105mm and +1.87% at 150mm. This is very reasonable for a zoom lens of this type and can always be further corrected in software.

Bokeh, the smoothness of the gradation of out of focus areas in an image, is important particularly for portraiture and the lens performs beautifully in this respect.

Flare is not a problem with even fairly strong backlight, but if bright light sources are included in the image this can generate artefacts that are quite visible. This will not generally be a problem and might create some interesting effects, but if not wanted some care should be taken to exclude such lighting.

At 35mm, there is -2.1 stops vignetting at f/2.8, but this reduces to -1.3 stops at f/4 and then to -1.0 stops throughout the rest of the aperture range. At 50mm, vignetting at f/3.2 starts out at -1.6 stops, reducing to -1.5 at f/4 and thereafter to a steady value of -1.3. At 105mm we start off at -1.8 stops at f/4, reducing to -1.4 at f/5.6 and thereafter to -1.1 throughout the aperture range. At 150mm we have a similar performance wide open, at -1.8 stops, but reducing to -1.2 at f/5.6, -1.1 at f/8 and then to -0.9 throughout the rest of the aperture range.

The VC system is a huge benefit. Tamron suggest a 5 stop advantage and with this reviewer that was found to be realistically and easily 4 stops. This is still an excellent advantage and of course some photographers will be steadier than others so individual experiences will differ slightly.

A very impressive performance throughout.


Tamron 35-150mm f/2.8-4 Di VC OSD Sample Photos

 

Tamron 35-150mm f/2.8-4 Di VC OSD Aperture range

You can view additional images in the Equipment Database, where you can add your own review, photos and product ratings.


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Comments


9 Aug 2019 10:45AM
Couldn't agree more, the lens is superb, I have had mine for about 3 months now and allied to the also superb 17-35 makes for a terrific pairing for Landscape. It is so sharp throughout the full zoom range, I sold my Nikon 16-35 shortly after getting it and even sold my Tamron 24-70 G2 it is just so much sharper than they were. Tamron says in the blurb it is like a little bunch of primes, that is not as far fetched as it sounds, they have produced a cracker!.

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