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10 stop ND filter


absurd 19 228 United Kingdom
17 Aug 2011 7:27PM
If you search for Polaroid ND filter on Amazon you'll find a 77mm one for 34.99
You do need to do a bit of experimenting with this type of ND filter to sort out which combinations of focal length and aperture don't give you a large X across the middle of the image.
Steve
MrDennis Plus
12 287 Wales
1 Sep 2011 12:15AM
Try 7dayshop.com. They got one, circular that gos all the way to 10 stop.
Give it a look.
MrBMorris 14 27 United Kingdom
15 Sep 2011 11:01PM
This may and prob does sound stupid but am I gonna get a vast difference between my Nd8 filter and the ND10 I wanna order, I haven't managed to get use from it yet due to my shifts.
Snapper 16 4.5k 3 United States Outlying Islands
15 Sep 2011 11:39PM

Quote:This may and prob does sound stupid but am I gonna get a vast difference between my Nd8 filter and the ND10 I wanna order, I haven't managed to get use from it yet due to my shifts.


The short answer is NO and you have the option of buying a much cheaper 2 stop and fitting it onto the 8 stop to end up with a 10 stop. Better still, get a 4 stop with your 8 stop and you'll have a 12 stop to make all the 10 stoppers jealous! Tongue
MrBMorris 14 27 United Kingdom
16 Sep 2011 12:59AM
I happen to have a ND2 ND4 & indeed an ND8, is screwing the 2 together gonna distort in anyway?
User_Removed 11 4.6k 1 Scotland
16 Sep 2011 1:38PM

Quote:This may and prob does sound stupid but am I gonna get a vast difference between my Nd8 filter and the ND10 I wanna order, I haven't managed to get use from it yet due to my shifts.

The short answer is NO and you have the option of buying a much cheaper 2 stop and fitting it onto the 8 stop to end up with a 10 stop. Better still, get a 4 stop with your 8 stop and you'll have a 12 stop to make all the 10 stoppers jealous! Tongue



But an ND 10 (if there is such a thing) is not a 10-stop ND filter. Its 3 and a wee bit stops.

Its a geometric progression:

ND2 = 1 stop
ND4 = 2 stops
ND 8 = 3 stops
etc...
66tricky 14 742 Scotland
16 Sep 2011 2:52PM

Quote:If you search for Polaroid ND filter on Amazon you'll find a 77mm one for 34.99
You do need to do a bit of experimenting with this type of ND filter to sort out which combinations of focal length and aperture don't give you a large X across the middle of the image.
Steve



The reason for the X is that full polarisation only occurs at 90 degrees to the sun and drops off to zero the further off axis you go. Many wide angle lenses exceed this angle of max polarisation. Regardless of the quality of the polarisers in the variable filter, you will see this effect when you go wider than the full field of polarisation and into the realms of partial polarisation i.e some of the image is polarised and the rest is not. You get the effect with a single polariser and a wide angle < about 24mm on an APS-C frame, albeit without the cross and only a dark vignette in the centre (assuming the pole of maximum polarisation is centre frame). There is another phenomenon called the Extinction Cross which occurs when crossed polarisers are not in perfectly collimated.

To create your own variable ND you need a circular polariser and a linear polariser. The linear goes at the outward position from the lens and the circular at the inner. The reason for this is that a circular polariser comprises a linear polariser at the outward face to filter the linear polarised light followed by quarter wave plate to rescatter the light so it doesn't upset the AF system etc.

So you need the linear then the circular to allow the two linears to interract, the following circular then rescatters the reduced transmission for AF and metering. NB if using linear and circular polariser of the form that fit in cokin style holders, be sure to insert the circular the correct way round to achieve ND i.e. linear side out.

If you need high factor ND with very wide lenses then the variable filter isn't for you due to the limitations of polarisation coverage.

There's an ephotozine article on a vND here: Light Craft Workshop Fader ND Mk II filter Filter Review
psiman 17 574 Wales
16 Sep 2011 2:54PM

Quote:ND2 = 1 stop
ND4 = 2 stops
ND 8 = 3 stops



I have a B+W 6 Stop and 10 Stop, the 6 stop ND increases the shutter speed by 64 times compared to the unfiltered exposures (2 to the power 6) whereas the 10 stop increases the shutter speed by 1,024 times (2 to the power 10), that makes a big difference to exposures.

Simon
66tricky 14 742 Scotland
16 Sep 2011 2:56PM

Quote:This may and prob does sound stupid but am I gonna get a vast difference between my Nd8 filter and the ND10 I wanna order, I haven't managed to get use from it yet due to my shifts.

The short answer is NO and you have the option of buying a much cheaper 2 stop and fitting it onto the 8 stop to end up with a 10 stop. Better still, get a 4 stop with your 8 stop and you'll have a 12 stop to make all the 10 stoppers jealous! Tongue

But an ND 10 (if there is such a thing) is not a 10-stop ND filter. Its 3 and a wee bit stops.

Its a geometric progression:

ND2 = 1 stop
ND4 = 2 stops
ND 8 = 3 stops
etc...



I think what we have is a confusion of terminoloies to describe ND filters and their effect on light.

ND filter types. That link shows the various nomenclatures associated with ND filters

e.g. ND 1024 = Filter Optical Density 3.0 = 10 stop exposure reduction.

You need to be careful when buying as the likes of Teamwork decribe their "big stop" filters using filter density of 3.0 whilst others talk of 10 stops and others yet, incorrectly, use ND10 to mean 10 stop which is not the same thing at all.
User_Removed 11 4.6k 1 Scotland
16 Sep 2011 10:15PM
There's quite a useful chart in the October issue of Digital Camera that dropped through the letterbox this morning.

According to it, both Hoya and Cokin (and I think Kood as well) use a system whereby a 10-stopper would be designated as an ND1000. The chart confirms what I stated above, that an ND2 is one stop, an ND4 is 2 stops and an ND8 is 3 stops.

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