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Agfa Copyproof paper, what is it?


mini670 13 172 United Kingdom
8 Oct 2008 6:18PM
I have got hold of 4 boxes of Agfa-Gavaret copyproof paper.
Three of the boxes state that it must be opened in red light. The other is non-sensitive to light and is wrapped in a clear bag, with CPP stamped on the box.
The other three boxes state that they are Negative paper and have CPN and CPTN stamped on the box. I have pulled one of these shheets out and its quite thin paper with a black emulsion.
Im stuggling to find anything on the net that may suggest what this stuff is.

Would have liked to try it out in a pinhole camera if it will work? My darkroom is not aset up at the minute so i cant have a play with it yet.

Any one know what it is?
Ta

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big_baboon 10 4 England
8 Oct 2008 7:09PM
Hi 15 years ago i used this paper in the litho print trade, it is a direct transfer paper, used to copy artwork.
Nigel.
KenTaylor Plus
12 3.0k 2 United Kingdom
8 Oct 2008 8:51PM
Kodak made similar (Kodagraph) and is the one I used as cheap proofing paper and experimental work. It delivers quality at the other end but interersting images can be had from it. And why not use it in a pinhole. A tutor at the old LCP once said `try it, if it works, do it again` Just use any print developer and fix.
Ken
mini670 13 172 United Kingdom
8 Oct 2008 9:54PM
thanks for the help. Yea Ill give it a go. Will be interesting to see how the black negative paper turns out. Also got a few bottles of unopened rodinal and some toner, think it will be at least 10 years old but ill give it a pop.
KenTaylor Plus
12 3.0k 2 United Kingdom
8 Oct 2008 10:24PM
Unopened it will last forever. When it goes a deep brown it still works, magic stuff.
Ken
mini670 13 172 United Kingdom
10 Oct 2008 6:37PM
well ive given it a pop. Took a while to get the camera working at all. But ive done some today in bright sunlight and its worked not too bad. The copy proof stuff works, but not half as good as std photographic paper. Rodinal is working not bad so far for developping the paper in these early stages. Need to spend more time now making a better camera, the one ive got now is a right old bodge job from a matchbox, though the pinhole is nice and round and has a diameter of 0.37mm so ill keep hole of that for the next oone and make it to optimal focal length, as the pinhole at the minute is aprox twice diameter it should be for the short focal length. Used MrPinhole for the calculations.
KenTaylor Plus
12 3.0k 2 United Kingdom
10 Oct 2008 8:05PM
Sounds like you're having fun. A matchbox must be the smallest so why not go for a big cardboard box.

Depends on what you mean by `as good` .The photographic result has its own quality. Many moons ago I attended a lecture given by the great man himself, Ansel Adams who stated that the photocopy image had a charm that he found pleasing and worthy of exploration.
Ken
mini670 13 172 United Kingdom
7 Nov 2008 7:49PM
Sorry about bumping.

Changed the matchbox camera now to accept 35mm flim, as many plans on the net. Put a roll of Delta 100 through it and took some random photos. I am really suprised at how they have come out, following simple exposure guides, a few ore over/under exposed but not half as bad as i thought.

It dawned on me yesterday that i have two HUGE rolls of B+W Kodak paper that i bought off ebay for a tenner stashed away in my Dads loft. Will try to make a roll feed pinhole from some of that. Darkroom nearly finished, used my old kitchen cabinets and a `second` worktop. Just need to seal the window up. Then ill begin with a larger `format` pinhole.
parmalee 8 1
8 Mar 2009 5:53PM
Hi, New to this site but was google searching for this paper and your site came up.
The paper you have is a two parts process paper that requires a specialized machine and chemicals to develope the image. (after you expose the first paper you must face that paper with the second part paper and together, run the two, face to face, through the chemicals and rollers.) I used to do state fairs (I'm sure that you've seen the 5 min photo of gamblers, western, whatever. that your pic is taken and voila, you get a walkaway copy in minutes?) That is the paper you have.
Without the processing machine and chemicals, I'm not sure if it is usable... (if it's out of production and you don't want your paper, I would be interested.
(The one box you have that is non-sensitive to light is what you face the sensitive one with).
Alpha Photo in Oakland (510-8931436) is where I purchased my items from in Sept, '93, The processor is called a AGFA CP 380E and was $503.00 at that time. I hope that helps you.
Parmalee
If you would like pictures of the processor so you know what to look for, e-mail me and I will send you excerpts from the manual


Quote:I have got hold of 4 boxes of Agfa-Gavaret copyproof paper.
Three of the boxes state that it must be opened in red light. The other is non-sensitive to light and is wrapped in a clear bag, with CPP stamped on the box.
The other three boxes state that they are Negative paper and have CPN and CPTN stamped on the box. I have pulled one of these shheets out and its quite thin paper with a black emulsion.
Im stuggling to find anything on the net that may suggest what this stuff is.

Would have liked to try it out in a pinhole camera if it will work? My darkroom is not aset up at the minute so i cant have a play with it yet.

Any one know what it is?
Ta

exenron 7 1
13 Sep 2009 12:29AM
CopyProof is a diffusion transfer process invented by Gevaert in the thirties and by Agfa a little later. It was appropriated by the allies as a war prize and given to Kodak and became the basis for Polaroid process. You have a paper negative exposed in a process camera and then fed, emulsion to emulsion, through a special chemical bath with a processing machine, CP35 and CP53 were the models. The chemistry was CP296 one bath liquid. You left the two pieces together for about a minute and then peeled them apart to use the image. Later Kodak came out with it's copy called PMT (Photo Mechanical Transfer). Copyproof also had specialized materials such as CPF (transparency film) and CPTN continuous tone which was initially used by the old time photo guys for instant photos.
All these materials went the way of the process camera since the revolution of prepress development on computer.
28 Feb 2010 9:14PM
Copy Proof paper has an encrypted message that cannot be digitally replicated and re-printed.

What is replicated on a photo copy or fax is a robust copy/void warning message.

When copied an “illegal copy” or “void” message shows brightly on the copy making any counterfeit copy obvious. Copy Proof Paper is suitable for most printers and is court enforceable

Copy Proof can not only be applied for document security but can also be used for photographs, painting & fabrics.

Visit www.CopyProof.eu
13 Sep 2011 3:41PM

Quote:CopyProof is a diffusion transfer process invented by Gevaert in the thirties and by Agfa a little later. It was appropriated by the allies as a war prize and given to Kodak and became the basis for Polaroid process. You have a paper negative exposed in a process camera and then fed, emulsion to emulsion, through a special chemical bath with a processing machine, CP35 and CP53 were the models. The chemistry was CP296 one bath liquid. You left the two pieces together for about a minute and then peeled them apart to use the image. Later Kodak came out with it's copy called PMT (Photo Mechanical Transfer). Copyproof also had specialized materials such as CPF (transparency film) and CPTN continuous tone which was initially used by the old time photo guys for instant photos.
All these materials went the way of the process camera since the revolution of prepress development on computer.



I used this process years ago in the Old Time Photo Studio. I still have the camera and would love to do some experimenting but have no idea where to start with an alternate process. When developed properly this process provided beautiful prints, however some did fade over time.

My question is what is the easiest and most inexpensive film and/or paper available for the old 8x10 cameras?
ceev 2 2
13 Dec 2014 9:55PM
Parmalee has the closest to my experience of Agfa CPP & CPN paper.

We used it for production of commercial artwork for press.

The version i used was black or white (no greys in-between) and a 'screen' would be placed under the neg paper for tonal images (i.e. trannys).

The rest of the time we used it to copy/resize logos, type or complete artwork.

The camera was a massive freestanding contraption (Agfa PMT camera, wish I kept the lens now!) that was lights, copy board with glass vacuum, lens, bellows and the vacuum imaging plate where the CPN went. You expose, pair up the exposed CPN & CPP through the rollers and chems, peel apart, wash 'n' dry, no fix.

There were also bleach pens that you could get to remove 'spots' or scratch it with a scalpel and a drop of water.

Hope you find the stuff useful, and if you come across a PMT camera, nick the lens, they have zero distortion!
ceev 2 2
13 Dec 2014 10:01PM

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