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Am I being greedy


Andysnapper 12 109 25 England
4 Jun 2008 10:55AM
Hi all,

As a recent photography convert I was wondering what people would consider to be a good ratio of keepers. At the moment I think that about 1 out of 100 of mine are worth putting on the wall. I know my technique and knowledge are still fairly limited so I might just be being greedy.

Andy
rowarrior 13 4.4k 9 Scotland
4 Jun 2008 11:08AM
I would say it depends on the subject. For instance, I was at Sno!zone, an outdoor snow slope thing they set up in Glasgow a couple of weekends ago. Took 450 pics, I think I have about 10 decent action shots. For landscapes I'd expect the hit rate to be higher, but then with my abilities, expectation and reality don't really match up right now Wink
Andysnapper 12 109 25 England
4 Jun 2008 11:13AM
I think that's my problem also. I bought the kit and expect to be great immediately. I have to remember that buying an expensive set of golf clubs wont let me win the Open.
I mainly take wildlife so I suppose that makes the keeper rate drop straight away.
Andy
rowarrior 13 4.4k 9 Scotland
4 Jun 2008 11:17AM

Quote:I mainly take wildlife so I suppose that makes the keeper rate drop straight away.



Ah, yes, we'll not go there on how many I took on Safari last year, and how many of them were keepers lol

However, perseverance is the way to go I've decided!
Andysnapper 12 109 25 England
4 Jun 2008 11:27AM
I agree, perserverance and taking more notes on settings, conditions etc. is the way forward.
By the way I've had a look at your gallery and it's excellent. I've only just joined here so my attempts look a little pathetic by comparison.
csurry 19 9.2k 92
4 Jun 2008 1:21PM
It's a strange scale of success to opportunity.

When you start out, success rate is low, but you keep ones that later you will be embarassed to admit you took and thought were good.

Gradually the rate of initial keepers will increase. I say initial cos eventually hard disk space and time will cause you to prune your library quite extensively.

Then you get better and then number of good shots is a greater proportion of those taken, but here's the crunch. How many are you going to keep?

Take my weekend shoot at Gigrin. Approx 90% are sharp. But do I keep 9/10? No. My criteria has changed.

Now they must be sharp and capture something different to what I already have. I mean how many shots of a sharp kite against sky do I need?

So the keep rate is back down near where it was when I started out. However, the shots I took on Saturday would still be "keepers" for many others.

So personally I wouldn't worry too much about the actual number, just whether you are improving.

It's a bit like golf, you know you're getting better when your bad shots are still acceptable and would be envied by many other players, in fact, they may not even notice it was a bad shot.
ade_mcfade 17 15.2k 216 England
4 Jun 2008 1:50PM
interesting thread

I was just looking through my history before and I've got 321 shots with 9 or less clicks, mostly from the early days.

So what I considered a hit back then maybe was a lot lower standard to what I do now - then again, I was less known then, so that measure isn't really that relevent as clicks are a measure of popularity in many ways.

The number of hits I get now is more down to

light,
subject,
energy and enthusiasm
and light,
and maybe more light.


If you have good light for the subject, I find I see more possibilities in the subject - take the mono london shots from a recent series, it was what most landscapers would call "terrible mid-day light".

Strong, harsh, dark shadows etc. But for modern architecture it was ideal, causing strong reflections and black shadows, the metallic bits glimmering in the sun.

On that day my hit rate was 2 out of 3, if not a bit more. I did a few of the bank of england that didn't work as well, but the modern ones were all useable.

if it's bad light, I am forever experimenting to try and make something from what light we have - that makes the hit rate go down, some days I get 0 useful shots, but at least I tried and learned something in the process

Subject - well i've tried a few different things, my architecture hit rate is the highest and is firmly my favourite subject these days.

Landscapes... well that's ALL down to the light really, though in my quest for originality, we end up in some very odd locations with subjects that don't always work. SO the hit rate there's between 1/20 and 1/5, dependant on light.

Energy/Enthusiasm - if I'm out on a sunday with a bit of a hangover, I'm far less likely to clamber up that hill or crouch to get that low angle shot. So the hit rate there is often very low. Sometimes you end up at location that does nothing for you at all, so you end up with little then


summary...

it varies Smile
csurry 19 9.2k 92
4 Jun 2008 1:54PM

Quote:Interesting thread

I was just looking through my history before and I've got 321 shots with 9 or less clicks, mostly from the early days.

So what I considered a hit back then maybe was a lot lower standard to what I do now - then again, I was less known then, so that measure isn't really that relevent as clicks are a measure of popularity in many ways.

The number of hits I get now is more down to

light,
subject,
energy and enthusiasm
and light,
and maybe more light.

If you have good light for the subject, I find I see more possibilities in the subject - take the mono london shots from a recent series, it was what most landscapers would call "terrible mid-day light".

Strong, harsh, dark shadows etc. But for modern architecture it was ideal, causing strong reflections and black shadows, the metallic bits glimmering in the sun.

On that day my hit rate was 2 out of 3, if not a bit more. I did a few of the bank of england that didn't work as well, but the modern ones were all useable.

if it's bad light, I am forever experimenting to try and make something from what light we have - that makes the hit rate go down, some days I get 0 useful shots, but at least I tried and learned something in the process

Subject - well i've tried a few different things, my architecture hit rate is the highest and is firmly my favourite subject these days.

Landscapes... well that's ALL down to the light really, though in my quest for originality, we end up in some very odd locations with subjects that don't always work. SO the hit rate there's between 1/20 and 1/5, dependant on light.

Energy/Enthusiasm - if I'm out on a sunday with a bit of a hangover, I'm far less likely to clamber up that hill or crouch to get that low angle shot. So the hit rate there is often very low. Sometimes you end up at location that does nothing for you at all, so you end up with little then


summary...

it varies



This wasn't about votes - but keepers. Are you on a mission to turn every thread into a click thread?
ade_mcfade 17 15.2k 216 England
4 Jun 2008 2:09PM
yes Smile

but I did expand quite a lot, as you've proved by copying the whole lot Wink

but I did an "order by" on my portfolio and selected "least first" by accident, was quite a nostalgia trip. Can remember every shot intimately.
sidaorb 15 3.9k 2 England
4 Jun 2008 3:52PM
Andy I can tell my photography is improving purely by my keep rate, when I 1st started motorsport I was happy with a 20% keep rate, at the end of last year I was running about 40-50%, now I'm upto about 60-70% :o) and I'm far more critical than I ever was before.

But I find whenever I start something new I end up back at the 20% rate, like I'm starting to dabble in Landscapes.

One of the problems with EPZ is that you end up judging your work against some of the best togs on here which can be very disheartening and with me and landscapes would put my keep rate down to about 1%
Coleslaw 15 13.4k 28 Wales
4 Jun 2008 3:58PM
Hmmm...I am totally opposite to Carl.
When I first started, I thought all or most of my photos were great, it was almost impossible to delete photos unless they were blur.
Now, even though I still keep most (as long as they are sharp), but I normally only have less than 5 or 10 photos that I am happy with.
Andysnapper 12 109 25 England
4 Jun 2008 6:49PM
Thanks All,

As was said earlier in the thread it can depend on what your shooting, light how you feel and any number of other imponderables. So keep practising and trying new things and don't worry about the hit rate, thats my motto from now on.
At least I don't feel too depressed about it now.
Cheers

Andy
mpnuttall 14 91 6 United Kingdom
13 Jun 2008 1:08PM
My hit rates always pretty low, but I've learnt to accept that as part of the process; i.e. the reason I take 30 shots of the same thing with only slightly different settings and angles is to improve my chances of getting a 'hit'. So if I sit in front of the PC and delete 29, but the other one is okay then I'm happy with that.

I went to Winnatts Pass nr Castleton for a sunset the other night. 40 minute drive there and back, nearly killed myself clambering to the top, got severe earache from the wind, and the light just wasn't right (in truth I wasn't in the right place). I got home, looked at them on my PC and deleted the lot.

You win some you lose some. If you're really good you lose a few less I suppose. I figure it all helps me learn - I've at least learnt not to climb Winnatts at sunset!!

Cheers, Mark
Phil_Restan 15 280 9 England
24 Jun 2008 11:09AM
Something else to consider Andy is that not only will your photography improve but also your processing will improve. So don't be too quick to delete everything that doesn't meet your present standards.
I'm sure there are loads of good photographers on this site that have returned to some of their old images, reprocessed them and been pleased with the new result.


Phil
joolsb 16 27.1k 38 Switzerland
24 Jun 2008 12:12PM
The last time I went out with my main camera I shot precisely 19 sheets of film (ignoring back-up exposures), of which eight images found their way on to my website and another five were keepers. Of course, when each processed sheet of 5x4 costs around a fiver, you do a lot of prep before you even set up the camera. I'm a little more liberal with the digicam but not much more - simply because viewing, assessing and managing 100s of images is such a chore.

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