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Any Double Glazing Experts out there ??


Taxboy 13 199
30 Sep 2012 6:26PM

Quote:I just went through this with my front door. As far as uPVC concerned they were all as ugly as each other and you had to deal with a slimy salesman for all of them. In the end I went for wood with these guys. Looks total class but twice the price of plastic,


Having another think about this I may well dig a little deeper for wooden doors. Initially I just thought uPVC as all of the windows were replaced 4 years ago with plastic ones - I'm guessing the patio doors and fortunatlely the front door weren't because of the cost at the time

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montechoro 12 2.3k 2 United Kingdom
30 Sep 2012 7:49PM
I would strongly agree with the Rehau profile recommendation above from dcash. We only use Rehau for our refurbishment works and install about 70k of Rehau doors and windows each year.

There are many profiles available and each manufacturer will make different claims.

Shop around and find a company that manufactures and installs its own frames. There are some double glazing installers that do just that. They only install and buy their frames in from volume manufacturers.

Look at the quality of the "V" shaped welds where horizontal and vertical profiles meet. They should be smooth and not reach or cut into the sealing gaskets around the frames - cheap frames and products have awful welds and some gaskets are cut by the weld if quality control is not up to much. If you can see little nipples of excess plastic sticking out - they have not been properly polished or finished in the factory.

Also make sure the profiles are reinforced - again, this can be conveniently omitted if someone wants to cut costs.

Make sure you have a multi-point locking system to the doors and for absolute peace of mind, change the key operated lock as soon as possible after the fitters leave site. Keep the one they fitted for a spare in case you need it at a later date.

Sadly, the variation in companies is huge and they are most certainly not all operating to the same standards of quality and workmanship.

Fensa is peace of mind for you.

If your double glazing salesman starts to quote in excess of 1,500 for a fully installed and guaranteed product - show him the door immediately.

If he quotes less than a 1k - watch out - there will be corners cut somewhere.
montechoro 12 2.3k 2 United Kingdom
30 Sep 2012 7:55PM
Having another think about this I may well dig a little deeper for wooden doors. Initially I just thought uPVC as all of the windows were replaced 4 years ago with plastic ones - I'm guessing the patio doors and fortunatlely the front door weren't because of the cost at the time


For French doors - I always think the wooden ones look better. The timber frames are much slimmer in section.
montechoro 12 2.3k 2 United Kingdom
30 Sep 2012 10:43PM
If you are considering options other than pvcu - don't forget there is also the option of aluminium clad timber - which is excellent for durability and maintenance purposes.

If your brick to brick opening size is no bigger than 1795 wide and 2095 high this product is well worth getting a quote for Aluminium clad timber doors

If the opening is of a standard builders size you might be able to avoid having something purpose made - which will be very cost effective for you.
SB74 2 1
9 Oct 2012 2:59PM
A friend of mine put me onto this website - www.doubleglazingcompanies.com - you can read about companies before choosing who to contact.
I found a local installer that was a damn sight cheaper than the nationals that I contacted initially.
dcash29 9 2.0k England
9 Oct 2012 10:15PM
Rockdoor do very nice patio doors
Fishnet 11 5.0k 5 United Kingdom
9 Oct 2012 11:41PM
I've got a similar problem, in that my windows are 110 years old and need fixing, at the very least they need sanding back, treating and repainting, they are making the house look really shabby and run down, how easy is it to do this myself, and when I say myself, I mean myself, as in me, up a ladder not having a clue what I'm doing?
strawman 11 22.0k 16 United Kingdom
9 Oct 2012 11:47PM
Can you judge how damaged the wood is?

If its flaking paint and not too much rot then I would recommend stripping the old paint off (use a hot air gun or chemical strip) then build it back up with wood primer, then undercoat then gloss to finish. It is labour intensive but not difficult. The hard part is getting it all clean and stripped back so you can apply new paint. The better the job you do of stripping it back the longer it will last.

If its just the paint looks dull then wash it and lightly sand then re-paint. The difficulty will be getting it dry enough at this time of year.

If the wood is rotten you need to get back to good wood, that could get difficult. At this time of year I would be tempted to just sand off the loose paint and then re-paint with gloss and save it for a job next year.
Fishnet 11 5.0k 5 United Kingdom
10 Oct 2012 8:11AM
Thank you! The air here is always damp as I live right on the edge of the beach so maybe I'll save the bigger job til next year and see if I can just get away with touching up the paint.
Mike_Smith Plus
8 225 1 United Kingdom
15 Oct 2012 9:51PM
Duraflex is a cracking profile to use if your thinking of French doors do you want them opening in or opening out. When opening out be aware of the wind can whip them back when opened unless you have stays put on them. Make sure that the UPVC profile is reinforced for extra strength. The door furniture ( handles etc) are of good quality becuse they is some real poor quality ones around. Also you want youre guarantee underwritten so if the company goes bust you have some come back
And as others have said you need to talk to the companys customers to see the quality of work. I used to work as a fitter until i had a bad accident. hope this helps.

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