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Best graphics card for Eizo CG276 monitor.


JohnJS 15 14
5 Mar 2014 3:51PM
I have purchased an Eizo monitor from the photography show at the NEC . that has a resolution of 2560 by 1440 & 10 bit. Has anyone any advice as to a suitable NVidia Graphics card for use with this monitor and my PC. The card installed in my PC at present Is a NVidia GT220 but is only bit. As I would like if possible to get it set up correctly, it will be only used for images for large prints and AV's.
Any help and advice much appreciated
Paul Morgan 20 19.5k 6 England
5 Mar 2014 5:38PM
Does it have to be an Nvidia card, AMD cards are every bit as good.

Are you using the latest versions of Photoshop and/or are you doing any high level video production work ?

Not all cards are the same, especially when it comes to Photoshop with its new graphics mercury engine.

2-untitled-2.jpg


Is it going to be needed for gaming as well ?

And what is your budget.
lemmy 14 2.9k United Kingdom
5 Mar 2014 5:44PM
Even the lowliest video card will do what you want. In fact, the built in graphics on a modern motherboard would too.

I have twin monitors with a pixel width of 3500 and the built in Intel graphics work just fine.
Paul Morgan 20 19.5k 6 England
5 Mar 2014 5:50PM
Not all cards are the same, you could have problems with the older cards, especially if there are no newer drivers available.

This also goes for the editing software you are using.

http://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/kb/photoshop-cs6-gpu-faq.html

To get all the required features there is no need to spend heaps of money, I only paid about sixty quid for my new card recently and its very capable.
GlennH 16 1.9k 1 France
5 Mar 2014 6:17PM
Using hardware calibration you're addressing the 10-bit screen with the monitor's 16-bit internal LUT, which greatly reduces any likelihood of banding. In that respect you're already able to bypass the GPU and benefit from the high quality of the display. It's just that you're not looking at 10-bit colour.

I'm not in any way expert on installing a complete 10-bit pipeline, but I think its benefits are dubiousódon't know how much the difference is appreciable. Regardless, I believe latter versions of Photoshop and Windows support it. Connectivity also plays a role - I think you need a DisplayPort connection. As for the graphics card, a flick over to other forums suggests it needs to be an Nvidia Quadro, if you're sticking with the same brand. Don't know about AMD cards.
JohnJS 15 14
5 Mar 2014 7:40PM
Thank you all for your prompt replies and the information you have given me.

I have since found out that the graphics card I have is probably adequate for the monitor, so I will give that a try first and see how things work out. I don't do video games, I have photoshop cc now and after processing I print from A4 up to A2.

Many thanks

John
Paul Morgan 20 19.5k 6 England
5 Mar 2014 9:28PM

Quote:As for the graphics card, a flick over to other forums suggests it needs to be an Nvidia Quadro, if you're sticking with the same brand. Don't know about AMD cards


The quadro cards are geared up for rendering and video work as are the ATI Firepro, pretty much any card is suitable for picture editing, even on-board graphics (motherboard or CPU) will manage most picture editing software.

People go on about Nvidia Cuda, again this is for video work and rendering, most picture editing programs including the latest Photoshop will not use it, even though it now supports video files and video editing, it uses open CL instructions instead.

Your card should be fine, though it may not be fully supported by Photoshop CC, If your using Photoshop CC, take a look in preferences under performance and and graphics processors settings, if your card is not supported the box next to open CL will be grayed out.

There is more about it here.

http://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/kb/photoshop-cs6-gpu-faq1.html

I could not recommend a card for you without knowing a little more about your system and its hardware, you can run into all sorts of problems going from recommendations from people that know nothing about your system.

And some information I might need.

Case size and type, will it take a full hight graphics card or is it low profile only ?

Motherboard slots, is there the room for a single slot/single width card only ? or is there plenty of space.

PSU capacity ? twin 12v rails or 1 single 12v rail ? a low pwered PSU might be fine for a fairly low powered card, but a PSU with a dual rail effectivaly halves the PSU`s maximum effective load and since the PSU`s rating is often split between the two rails, over loading a single rail and you risk damaging the PSU and anything conected to it.

Have you a surfient spare power lead to power the graphics card if its needed, with the correct plug ?

Case cooling ? if its not brilliant then a card with a fan will be better than a card that relies upon pasive cooling only.

If you not in the know, then its best to check the spec and power rating of your current card and replace this with something that is similar in its power needs.
Jestertheclown 12 8.5k 253 England
5 Mar 2014 10:08PM
You could, of course, just phone Eizo.
lemmy 14 2.9k United Kingdom
5 Mar 2014 10:56PM

Quote:You could, of course, just phone Eizo.


You could. But if they have a link up with some graphics card maker, their advice is no different or more reliable than a financial adviser's. How will you know if they have such a link up?

Personally, I find practical advice from people who have tried it themselves much more reliable than a commercial entity who, quite naturally, is dedicated not to its users interests but making its profits to pay its directors' bonuses.

Does that sound cynical? I hope so.
GlennH 16 1.9k 1 France
5 Mar 2014 10:58PM

Quote:As for the graphics card, a flick over to other forums suggests it needs to be an Nvidia Quadro, if you're sticking with the same brand. Don't know about AMD cards

The quadro cards are geared up for rendering and video work as are the ATI Firepro, pretty much any card is suitable for picture editing, even on-board graphics (motherboard or CPU) will manage most picture editing software.



I was talking about displaying 10-bit colour, Paul, which cannot be achieved with any video card. As it turns out, the OP wasn't alluding to that anyway, but it is possible with his 10-bit Eizo display. Whether it's worthwhile is another questionóI'd be interested to find out.
Paul Morgan 20 19.5k 6 England
6 Mar 2014 12:25AM
10 bit colour would need a graphics card that will support it, ATI Firepro and the like.

http://support.amd.com/en-us/search/faq/48

Or one of the newer APU`s, and these are quite interesting.

http://www.techpowerup.com/170070/amd-launches-first-ever-amd-firepro-apu.html

If I was to plug in a monitor my system and graphics will support 10 bit.
Paul Morgan 20 19.5k 6 England
6 Mar 2014 12:39AM
If I was to plug in a monitor my system and graphics will support 10 bit.

I should have said, if I connected a 10 bit display my hardware would support it.
GlennH 16 1.9k 1 France
6 Mar 2014 1:26AM
I have a 10-bit monitor, though it's a poor man's version (one of Dell's 8-bit + dithering affairs). I can also theoretically hardware calibrate it, but I gave that up when the X-Rite software I was obliged to use started playing up.

I don't have the graphics hardware to display 10-bit anyway, and wouldn't imagine it to be worthwhile, but I may be wrong. If I was in John's position I might rig that up, if only out of curiosity. Another hitch, though, is that the software has to support it as well. I think Windows 7 and 8 can be configured for 10-bit, as can full versions of Photoshop. Last time I heard, it wasn't possible with a Mac OS.
Paul Morgan 20 19.5k 6 England
6 Mar 2014 2:53AM
This is what Eizo has to say.

http://www.eizo.com/global/support/compatibility/photoshopcs6_nvidia_amd/index.html

I have a 10-bit monitor, though it's a poor man's version (one of Dell's 8-bit + dithering affairs)

Hehe, well I thought my Dell was 8 bit, but its more like 6 bit with dithering SmileSmile

Adobe makes things a little confusing, they call it 30 bit display support, but it is obviously 10 bit.

It looks like my system will support it, its not greyed out and I can stick a tick in it.

3-untitled.jpg


Before I added a graphics card (while I made do with on-board graphics) I could not even select open CL.
lemmy 14 2.9k United Kingdom
6 Mar 2014 8:54AM
Going back to basics, if you are not playing games and are more photographer than graphics artist, any modern motherboard graphics, let alone graphics card is more than good enough.

I have a Lacie photo monitor and a Samsung cheaper one. I calibrate them simply because when I send work to other people or companies with calibrated monitors I know we are seeing roughly the same thing. It also gives me the luxury of soft proofing with Lightroom and knowing that the results I will collect from the professional printer will be exactly as I have seen on screen.

Incidentally, since my monitors are side by side, I can see how much 'better', that is brighter and more vibrant the pix look on the Samsung than the Lacie, which is quite dull by comaprison. In point of fact the Samsung will not adjust down to the 100 candy thingies I use on the Lacie, so always looks brighter.

Anyone looking at one of my pix on both would prefer he inaccuracy of the Samsung.

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