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birds in flight


Big Bri 20 16.7k United Kingdom
14 Jan 2011 12:53PM

Quote:The link is slightly broken. Use this: www.birdsasart.com

Nice pictures but I was expecting some sort of tutorial on actually taking the pictures - or did I miss something??



No idea, I was just fixing Denny's link.
Professional 14 128 United Arab Emirates
15 Jan 2011 5:37PM
Buy Canon EF 400mm f5.6, i heard many told me that it is one of the greatest lens for birds in flight.
csurry 19 9.2k 92
16 Jan 2011 4:13PM
Adrian asked me about the AF-ON technique, so I have added an article to my website as it is a bit wordy for a single post.

AF-ON Technique

Will do a similar one for metering from grass later.
tomcat 15 6.4k 15 United Kingdom
16 Jan 2011 5:06PM
Just read the article CherylSmile
One instance where I can see it being of great benefit, is when the GSW comes flying in and settles.
I can always quickly rotate the camera to the vertical (portrait), but then waste valuable seconds, resetting the focus point, by which time the subject has probably moved.
This technique should eliminate that particular procedure,I thinkGrin

Adrian
tomcat 15 6.4k 15 United Kingdom
16 Jan 2011 5:18PM
Forgot to add apologies to Ian, for semi-hijacking his threadWink
Graywolf 14 1.0k United Kingdom
16 Jan 2011 7:19PM
The Canon 400 f5.6 is great for flight photography.

Back AF button is useful to practice with.

If you live near the sea go and photograph seagulls. There are lots about, they're used to humans and they will give you loads of excellent practice at following, and remember that good flight shots are easier to get against a blue sky that against clouds, when you will need to dial in some exposure compensation.
hotwings 10 3 United Kingdom
20 Mar 2011 8:58PM
thanks all for youre help
StrayCat 17 19.1k 3 Canada
21 Mar 2011 1:55AM

Quote:The Canon 400 f5.6 is great for flight photography


I thought it would be a good BIF lens also, however, I have recently read that it's too long for an APS C camera for BIF, which makes sense to me. So full frame I would go for it, but with the 1.6 crop factor of my camera, I'll be getting the Canon ef 200mm f2.8L USM; the 70-200mm is more versatile, but way too heavy for me to lug around, and just too conspicuous for street photography. The Canon 70-200mm f4.0L is a tempting alternative, but I think I would always regret not having 2.8, and with the prime one can add the 1.4 TC and still have a fast f4.0.
Graywolf 14 1.0k United Kingdom
26 Mar 2011 9:30PM

Quote:The Canon 400 f5.6 is great for flight photography

I thought it would be a good BIF lens also, however, I have recently read that it's too long for an APS C camera for BIF, which makes sense to me. .



I'm curious. Why would a 400mm lens be too long for a 1.6 sensor?
justin c 17 5.1k 36 England
26 Mar 2011 9:35PM
A 400mm on a 1.6 crop body most certainly wouldn't be too long for birds in flight. In the vast majority of situations it won't be long enough. It's often referred to as a good lens for flight photography with one major consideration, i.e. that you live in the States, where a lot of species are much, much closer and more approachable. A 500mm with a 1.4X Extender is a much better option for here in the UK and even this won't always be sufficient.
Coleslaw 16 13.4k 28 Wales
26 Mar 2011 9:37PM
depends on what birds though.
justin c 17 5.1k 36 England
26 Mar 2011 9:40PM
That's true Cole, I'm assuming just general bird in flight photography rather than small songbird type set-ups, where of course a shorter lens can suffice.
Eastlands 10 760 4 Northern Ireland
26 Mar 2011 9:41PM
A 70-300mm with some planning and preparation can give good results and yield great images.
Graywolf 14 1.0k United Kingdom
26 Mar 2011 10:08PM

Quote: A 500mm with a 1.4X Extender is a much better option for here in the UK and even this won't always be sufficient.


Hmm I don't have a 500mm......... yet but most of my bif shots are handheld and I'm not sure for how long I could HH a 500 for
JacquiJay 14 10 1 United Kingdom
26 Mar 2011 10:26PM
The thing about a x2 teleconverter is that it is closing down your aperture and giving you less light. I don't know what your widest aperture is on the lens you are using but on my 300mm f2.8 it closes me down to f5.6. Nevertheless, I do a lot of bird photography with this set-up, including flyers. It is difficult to get focus and then pan, but don't give up, practice will eventually pay dividends. I use Nikon camera and Nikon converter because staying with the same brand makes a difference. Good luck.

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