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Blues Power


jondf 14 2.8k
5 Sep 2008 9:54PM
Junior Wells and Buddy Guy feature in steaming blues shuffle.
kaybee Plus
16 7.6k 26 Scotland
5 Sep 2008 10:06PM
I grew up in the wrong place at the wrong time for sure
ckristoff 16 994 Wales
5 Sep 2008 10:19PM
When all else fails folks, the blues won't let you down.

Rock and Roll may be great; but the Blues is the real deal!


Frank.
pcheywood 15 1.3k England
5 Sep 2008 11:13PM
Disappointed...........Thought the thread was about Man City. Smile

Paul.
jondf 14 2.8k
5 Sep 2008 11:22PM

Quote:Disappointed...........Thought the thread was about Man City


Go ahead and start one
gcarth Plus
16 3.9k 1 United Kingdom
6 Sep 2008 9:31AM

Quote:Junior Wells and Buddy Guy feature in steaming blues shuffle.
Great stuff! I always loved Buddy Guy's rather frenetic guitar style. Always nice to hear some good old harmonica in the blues too.
Interesting to see Buddy Guy playing a Gibson. I always associated him with a Fender Strat, both in the old days and in the present.

Garth
pepperst 13 2.3k 4 Wales
6 Sep 2008 9:35AM

Quote:Disappointed...........Thought the thread was about Man City.

Paul.



I wonder if a love of the blues and city are linked, hope and misery in a repetitive cycle.

Thanks Jon, best way to start a rainy welsh morning Grin
ckristoff 16 994 Wales
6 Sep 2008 11:57PM
Great thread folks!

I'm not an expert on the Blues, having been introduced to Blues music, via Eric Clapton and Robert Cray.

I love modern electric guitar driven Blues music. One of my favourite bands is the Blues Band, featuring Paul Jones. Walter Trout is also good.


Frank.
jondf 14 2.8k
7 Sep 2008 12:17AM

Quote:One of my favourite bands is the Blues Band, featuring Paul Jones. is also good


Yeah, I keep meaning to get some Walter Trout but it never happens for some reason...
Been listening to the WT Feaster Band a lot lately.
StrayCat 17 19.1k 3 Canada
7 Sep 2008 7:23AM
Eric Clapton tries hard, but there's something about the Blues that shuts out most white folks; Eric is a fabulous musician, but his singing voice is not blusey, and his phrasing on the guitar is noticeably not genuine blues. Robert Cray is a West Coast product who hung around with everybody to try and break into the real blues world, including BB King.

To hear some truly vintage Blues, try Albert Collins. He played a Fender Telecaster, with his own personal tuning, and he used his thumb instead of a pick. He has a truly original sound.

Then theres big Arthur King. He was left handed, but did not restring his Flying Vee Gibson. He played with the strings upside down, also using his thumb. Jimi Hendrix spent hours watching Arthur on stage trying to figure out what he was doing with his guitar to get his unique sound.

Ry Cooder is considered by many to be a genious with the Blues, but for some reason he left the main stream just as he was coming on, and went into relative obscurity doing soundtracks for movies. He wrote all the music for "Crossroads."

Otis Rush has toured Europe, and was a big hit in Britain. He's definitely a traditional Blues man, and he uses a Strat.

Robben Ford is a wizard with his guitar, which he had custom made by Fender, and is shaped much like a Les Paul and has powered pickups. He uses Mesa amps, and tapes over his settings at live gigs to hide them. He was rhythm guitarist for Miles Davis' jazz band at a very early age, and is also from the West Coast. His early days in jazz have a big influence on his Blues today.

Roy Bucanan is one of the few white folks who can articulate Blues with an authentic flare, along with Bonnie Raitt, Ronnie Earl and a few others.

Blues is not complicated music, but the phrasing is something a truly good Blues player is born with, or learns at a very early age. I've heard some great musicians who just cannot play the Blues convincingly; I believe it's in the genes.Wink
rhiw_com 14 24
7 Sep 2008 8:37AM

Quote: Then theres big Arthur King. He was left handed, but did not restring his Flying Vee Gibson. He played with the strings upside down, also using his thumb. Jimi Hendrix spent hours watching Arthur on stage trying to figure out what he was doing with his guitar to get his unique sound.


Roy Bucanan is one of the few white folks who can articulate Blues with an authentic flare, along with Bonnie Raitt, Ronnie Earl and a few others.



I think you mean Albert King Denny!

In January 1989 I bought a new American Standard Telecaster at The Soho Sound Centre in London, It's a black one with a Rosewood fingerboard, just like the one Roy Bucanan use to play (Amongst others) When I looked at the Fender tag when I got home. It had been built on August 14th 1988, the very day that Roy had died. Is that strange or what.

Rg Tony
jondf 14 2.8k
7 Sep 2008 9:16AM

Quote: I think you mean Albert King Denny!


Or Freddie King? He was a big bug*er Grin ....don't think he was a left-hander though.


Quote:Eric is a fabulous musician, but his singing voice is not blusey


Interesting point. When Cream recorded 'Disraeli Gears' in New York in 1967, the record label management wanted Clapton to take the lead vocal in preference to Bruce because they thought Eric had a 'better blues voice'. I agree with you to an extent but these record company people are clever. The saw in Clapton an effective bridge that would entice many middle-class whites into an area they hitherto had feared to tread.
gcarth Plus
16 3.9k 1 United Kingdom
7 Sep 2008 10:02AM
It's hard to put into words what is the difference between typical white blues artists and black blues artists. Of course often it's easier to hear the difference in vocals - just try to imagine a white man singing like B.B. King or John Lee Hooker...I really don't think many white men could. (I'm not just talking about the merits of the vocals here, but the particular timbre).
What is perhaps less tangible is the difference in performance between white and black instrumentalists.
I think in general terms, black performers play both jazz and blues better than whites. I think whites often play a bit too nervously, almost ahead of the beat. Black performers, on the other hand, get more 'inside' the beat and they know better how to manipulate the exciting ingredients of tension and release in blues and jazz. Of course we shouldn't be too surprised - historically. blues and jazz are essentially black music.

Garth
tomcat 15 6.4k 15 United Kingdom
7 Sep 2008 10:14AM
listening to the blues right now
For our pains we subscribe to the 40 music channel on Sky and the blues section is top notch

Adrian
tomcat 15 6.4k 15 United Kingdom
7 Sep 2008 10:29AM
where else can you listen to Lightin' Hopkins at 10-30 on a wet Sunday morning

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