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Camera kit, hiking kit, food, drink. Is there a way to carry it all?


trailguru 8 15 United Kingdom
12 Feb 2021 10:48AM
It's a challenge. So far, with no answers. I'd like to hear from someone who has found a great way to carry a comprehensive MFT mirrorless system plus hiking gear for a day's hiking in the wilds?

I carry: 2 bodies, 4 lenses, tripod, filter system and accessories plus spare fleece, waterproof top, waterproof trousers, gloves, hat, about 1.5L drink (often in a bladder) and lunch.

For a long time I used a fishing vest for the camera gear plus daypack for the rest but the vest pockets are not secure nor big enough to carry a large tele zoom. All the dedicated camera backpacks are too small (I reckon on needing around 30L) to include hiking gear or much too heavy.

I've taken a good look at quite a few systems (Peak Designs, Wandrd, f stop, Pacsafe, Tenba and Lowepro to name a few) but they all fall short. Enough to discount them.

I'm moving toward buying an insert(s) with a good 30-40L hiking backpack with a front opening to get at camera gear. But it would be great to hear from a photographer who's found a good, comfortable way to carry camera kit with hiking gear.
thewilliam2 3 1.5k United Kingdom
12 Feb 2021 11:09AM
One my wife's BIPP colleagues is a photographer with the Army. They have to carry much the same kit as ordinary soldiers, including weapons and ammunition, PLUS their camera kit and laptop.

The regular Bergen and webbing seems to do the trick.
12 Feb 2021 12:15PM
Approaching the problem from a different angle, Is it not possible for you to carry less kit ?
Maybe one body and two lenses?
The Olympus that you use has 5-axis in-body stabilization, and I believe it gives good quality at high-ish ISO... so even though some would consider this to be unforgivable sacrilege, could you possibly even manage without a tripod? The filter system ( presumably you're talking ND Grads ) could possibly be replaced by a few minutes work in whatever editing software you use.

I used to carry a load of gear up onto the Lake District fells until I got sick of it. So I cut all the way back to hand-holding and just carrying one ( sometimes two ) lenses. Didn't take me long to adapt, and I enjoyed my days in the hills a lot more, not having to lug so much stuff around.

Just a suggestion.

Alan
Carabosse 17 41.5k 270 England
12 Feb 2021 12:29PM

Quote: I carry: 2 bodies, 4 lenses, tripod, filter system and accessories


Whereas if you get something like the new Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra, you get 4 lenses - including ultrawide, 3x and 10x optical zooms - all in a device you can slip into your pocket.

Problem solved!Tongue
JJGEE 16 7.9k 18 England
12 Feb 2021 12:46PM
Take a look at the Shimoda

Some UK retailers stock them or you can buy direct from Shimoda.

12 Feb 2021 12:50PM
I am not really one for commenting, but I know how difficult it was for me to find a comfortable system. I now use inserts (Tenba BYOB) inside my Osprey hiking backpacks. As a field biologist, I have to spend a lot of time hiking after animals across rough terrain, so a comfortable backpack was key - the Talon, Kestrel are my go toos. Easy enough to open, although it would have been nice to have a front access panel. I don't carry as much camera equipment as you, so it is probably easier for me to set the BYOB insert in an open position for easy "flip the lid open and grab".

All the extra straps and attachment points on these backpacks allow me to attach extra equipment and the AirScape back panels keep the load spread nicely.

Typical day equipment: Fuji body, 4 lenses including telephoto and macro, filter systems, batteries, Tripod (strapped to the outside of the bag), food, water (bladder and bottle), binoculars, layers depending on environment but always a spare hoody/fleece and rain jacket, rangefinder, headtorch, Leatherman, notepads, pencils, raincover. Sometimes accompanied by field specific equipment which get packed in and attached to wherever there is space.
Finding a way to fit it all in so I had fast easy access to the camera was not as difficult as I thought it would be, once I prioritised.

Hope that helps a little
Cephus 16 2.6k England
12 Feb 2021 2:00PM
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philstan 4 550 United Kingdom
12 Feb 2021 3:15PM
What works for me is a Lowe Alpine AirZone Pro 35:45L backpack which has a zipped side entry to the main compartment so you can swing the bag round on one shoulder and access camera kit stored in a compartmentalised bag. Plenty of room for other stuff.
Big Bri 19 16.7k United Kingdom
12 Feb 2021 9:54PM
I use a Lowepro Photo Sport BP AW 300, after asking a similar question on here back in 2018. It's not perfect, but allows me to carry food, drink and waterproofs, plus a bunch of other stuff, with a padded compartment for DSLR and lens, plus one spare lens.

It's far better than trying to stuff a waterproof jacket and sarnies into a dedicated camera bag, or shoving your camera in the top of a normal rucksack (which I've done many many times).

Linky



BobinAus Plus
5 3 10 Australia
13 Feb 2021 2:59AM
Like SimSanghera I use a standard back pack. Mine is a Deuter 60 litre front loader. An insert, home made from non-compressible foam, protects the camera equipment in the upper compartment. With it, I can easily 2 Pentax APSC bodies, a couple of 'largish' lenses, a box of NISI filters and a large tripod, a Manfrotto 190B. I split the tripod and carry the two pieces externally, one on each side of the pack so that it remains well balanced while walking. There's plenty of additional room for lots of warm and waterproof clothing, food, water and other essentials. The pack is big but is very comfortable on a full day walk.
trailguru 8 15 United Kingdom
13 Feb 2021 7:45AM
@Everyone - thank you all for taking time to respond. I'll review my approach and investigate your suggestions (although my partner said 'No mules or donkeys!').
Cephus 16 2.6k England
13 Feb 2021 8:00PM

Quote:@Everyone - thank you all for taking time to respond. I'll review my approach and investigate your suggestions (although my partner said 'No mules or donkeys!').
Shame.Wink
20 Feb 2021 1:40PM
Think Tank belt and harness for the camera and lenses, wife for the food and drink.
LenShepherd 12 4.3k United Kingdom
26 Feb 2021 8:22AM

Quote:It's a challenge. So far, with no answers. I'd like to hear from someone who has found a great way to carry a comprehensive MFT mirrorless system plus hiking gear for a day's hiking in the wilds?

I carry: 2 bodies, 4 lenses, tripod, filter system and accessories plus spare fleece, waterproof top, waterproof trousers, gloves, hat, about 1.5L drink (often in a bladder) and lunch.

For a long time I used a fishing vest for the camera gear plus daypack for the rest but the vest pockets are not secure nor big enough to carry a large tele zoom. All the dedicated camera backpacks are too small (I reckon on needing around 30L) to include hiking gear or much too heavy.

I've taken a good look at quite a few systems (Peak Designs, Wandrd, f stop, Pacsafe, Tenba and Lowepro to name a few) but they all fall short. Enough to discount them.

I'm moving toward buying an insert(s) with a good 30-40L hiking backpack with a front opening to get at camera gear. But it would be great to hear from a photographer who's found a good, comfortable way to carry camera kit with hiking gear.

LenShepherd 12 4.3k United Kingdom
26 Feb 2021 8:28AM
Staying young and keeping fit are in the background.
I used to be abled to hike for miles with 45 pounds weight of kit - approaching 80 it is down to 35 pounds.

Good back packs with a harness to distribute considerable weight on the hips I find very helpful.

A large breakfast and evening meal can help - with perhaps only an energy drink and snack for lunch.


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