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Carle Zeis Vs Nikon


TonyCoridan 7 137 United Kingdom
10 Mar 2013 7:09PM

Quote:Do these lenses have smooth running apertures without click stops, if not I can`t see any advantages.


Please, elaborate.

Thanks,

Tony

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TonyCoridan 7 137 United Kingdom
10 Mar 2013 7:11PM

Quote:Get the Nikon, you'll never be disapointed.


I took the plunge and got the Super NikonGrinWink

Tony
Paul Morgan 19 19.4k 6 England
10 Mar 2013 7:31PM

Quote:Please, elaborate


Lenses with smooth running apertures without click stops are widely used for video/film.
thewilliam 11 6.1k
11 Mar 2013 11:38AM
If you really want to do things properly, wait for the new series of Zeiss lenses.

The standard lens is a 55mm Distagon, takes 82mm filters, and is said to knock even the new Apo-Summicron M into a cocked hat. It'll be around 3000 Euros, which is about half of the new Leica M equivalent.
LenShepherd 12 4.2k United Kingdom
12 Mar 2013 6:16AM
I do not own any Zeiss lenses and have do not intend to buy any; which is not the same as saying they cannot be better optics.
The query is perhaps mainly for D800 owners. It seems fairly widely accepted going from 12MP to 36MP about doubles sensor resolution. Zeiss lenses might in themselve have 10 or even 15% more resolution at some apertures than a near equivalent AF Nikon.
Part of what really matters is image file resolution. When the camera has about double the lens resolution, as generally happens with a D800 and a good lens, a 15% increase in lens resolution equates to about 5% in the finished file. Double the sensor resolution equates to about 50% more resolution in the image - but there is more to image quality perception than resolution in isolation. More pixels on a sensor increase the inability to separate subtle tones and colours within the image, which has little to do with the underlying image resolution.
Digressing slightly starting around the D7000 Nikon introduced distortion control in the retouch menu which in many ways does what an expensive tilt and shift lens does. If you have a camera with this option and have never tried it, take a shot of a room interior and have your eyes opened!
Does this make tilt and shift lenses redundant? In my opinion the tilt facility is better than that on a tilt lens, although the shift facility does not change the actual plane of depth of field - so you may have to you stop the lens down an extra aperture or so when using the retouch menu.
Tilt and shift lenses are not exactly convenient to use as they are manual focus, ideally require a tripod and are expensive though they do a few things that cannot otherwise be photographically done.
And so to some extent it is with a Zeiss lens. I think they are all manual focus, they are expensive, a tripod is desirable to get the best from them, and with modern DSLR's you may need liveview zoomed in to get the most accurate focus. They do not have the convenience of autofocus or zooms and limit the flexibility of a DSLR. They do when conditions are right enable the very highest quality to be achieved.
If you have been in photography as long as I have you have probably learned getting an extra 5 to 10% quality costs roughly twice as much with some loss of convenience. This is very much true of Zeiss lenses.
It is up to photographers with enough money to afford to buy them to decide whether to go for the challenge of sometimes being able to get a little bit of extra quality, or to instead own a wider range of photographic equipment.
Zeiss have an economy of scale advantage in that development costs can be shared amongst Nikon and Canon users. This specialist market segment is small. It seems to me Nikon have for some years been running down development of what was an exceptional range of manual focus lenses in favour of co-operating with Zeiss.
thewilliam 11 6.1k
12 Mar 2013 12:01PM

Quote:Digressing slightly starting around the D7000 Nikon introduced distortion control in the retouch menu which in many ways does what an expensive tilt and shift lens does. If you have a camera with this option and have never tried it, take a shot of a room interior and have your eyes opened!
Does this make tilt and shift lenses redundant? In my opinion the tilt facility is better than that on a tilt lens, although the shift facility does not change the actual plane of depth of field - so you may have to you stop the lens down an extra aperture or so when using the retouch menu.



Tilt and shift lenses come into their own when doing table-top product photography: the sort of work that once demanded large-format. Being able to tilt the plane of sharpness is very useful and a lot more convenient than focus-stacking. Can the Nikon software bring out-of-focus areas into acceptable sharpness?

The one Zeiss lens that I do own, the 100 Makro, has one disadvantage over the Nikon 105: its depth of field seems smaller and focussing needs to be exact. I had the same issue when I bought Apo Rodagons to replace my Nikon enlarging lenses. They were considerably sharper than the Nikons and a 20x24 print was better than a 16x12 from the Nikons had been but only when in exact focus. Also, the enlarger needed to be set up using a precision spirit level.

In other matters, I must bow to Len's experience because I didn't start in photography until 1956.
LenShepherd 12 4.2k United Kingdom
12 Mar 2013 4:31PM

Quote:
Tilt and shift lenses come into their own when doing table-top product photography: the sort of work that once demanded large-format. Being able to tilt the plane of sharpness is very useful and a lot more convenient than focus-stacking. Can the Nikon software bring out-of-focus areas into acceptable sharpness?


I thought I covered that by saying the in camera facility does not change the plane of focus - so in the sense you mean - no.
In the sense of being able to use shift movements as well as tilt when you cannot get in the right position, Nikon in camera software does it by way of an edit after the original capture. Nikon say with the D7100 movements can be applied, including to video, before capturing an image.
I find being able to correct verticals and to apply the equivalent of swing to an image in camera very useful. With the demise of Jacobs and Jessops it is more difficult to visit a camera shop to see what Nikon cameras can do. I would not be surprised if some other brands of camera have similar features

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