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cinematic problem


14 Jan 2019 3:24AM
I have an Olympus OM D EM 5 Mark 1, and I use 17mm f1.8 lens, but I need to know some tips to shoot a cinematic film, please help

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Paul Morgan 18 19.3k 6 England
14 Jan 2019 3:28AM
No such thing as cinematic film but there are plenty of different cinematic looks.
14 Jan 2019 3:36AM
Yes, of course, sorry, but I need to know the best setting for my Olympus to get my video a cinematic look
Tianshi_angie 4 2.4k England
14 Jan 2019 10:02AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4-JuAGpbRo

Try Googling what you want. But it will depend on what exactly you want.
sausage Plus
14 576 United Kingdom
14 Jan 2019 11:24AM
It is not as easy as it sounds to get a 'cinematic' look out of a camera. I don't know about that particular model but it is the editing software that may give you the look that you want. Blackmagic's DaVinci is one.

But as a start set the camera on manual and set the frame rate to 25p (PAL). This brings with it it's own problem of introducing stuttering in the picture when panning.

I only there was a menu setting that has 'cinematic look' ticked!
Chris_L 5 5.0k United Kingdom
14 Jan 2019 12:43PM
24 frames per second.(You can get away with 25 though) Shutter speed strictly set to 1/50s to get the same motion blur seen in every great hollywood movie*

Then to emulate some cinematic scenes shoot with a decent prime lens and set an aperture that will give you shallow DOF at that focal length.

Wide aperture, slow shutter speed = over exposure on a lot of days so you might like to purchase a a *variable* ND filter like this /Hama-Variable-Neutral-Density-Filter/dp/B004ZLVL12

Then I think it's about how you move the camera and how you grade the footage.

I did this with my little Panasonic MFT a few years ago. Notice at 50 seconds I deliberately get rid of some of the cine look.

*There are exceptions of course, eg the start of Saving Private Ryan uses a fast shutter speed and high fps, some viewers percieve an unpleasant staccato effect and that's why some people don't like it.






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