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crash39 15 24 England
12 Jan 2006 6:02AM
Ok, this is probably going to sound very silly to most people, but here goes.

I have two cameras, a Konica Minolta Z10 & an Olympus E500 ( two lenses 14-45 & 40-150).
I can take really close up photographs of flowers ( petal, stamen etc.), in focus using manual focussing on the Z10, but the equivalent cannot be done on the E500. Now I know they do a macro lens for the E500, but that is a 50mm lens, so why can't I do the same with my E500 as with the Z10 with my 14-45 lense???
theorderingone 17 2.4k
12 Jan 2006 6:25AM
You could get yourself some close up dioptre lenses. These would help to get you closer although the quality will not be quite as good as a dedicated macro lens.

Dioptre lenses screw onto the front of the lens making your camera 'short sighted' which is what you need for close ups.

A +2 and maybe a +4 would be a good start for you. The lenses can be stacked to make a +6 aswell.

If I'm not making much sense, I've just had a lemsip and it's made me all lightheaded! :{
NikLG 16 1.7k England
12 Jan 2006 6:25AM
Being a bit ignorant myself I can only offer this 'advice'.
It depends on how close your current E500 lens can focus.
That's the difference between a macro and non-macro lens ( as far as I know ). You should be able to find out the minimum focus distance for your lens somewhere ( in the lens manual, if you have one, or sometimes even on the lens itself ).


..and what's wrong with the fact that the macro lens is 50mm ? I have a 105mm macro lens. Just means you don't have to get as close to to the thing you want to shoot.
And a 50mm lens is a good thiing to have, for portraits and such.

Nik
digicammad 18 22.0k 40 United Kingdom
12 Jan 2006 6:27AM
You could also get a set of extension tubes. There is an article on this site about the different methods for doing macro, worth a read.

edit - Here it is.

Ian
strawman 17 22.2k 16 United Kingdom
12 Jan 2006 6:30AM
A crash course in optics required. The Z10 focal length is in reality much smaller than the 35mm equivalent focal length talked about in the advertising etc. Also the Z10 has a much smaller sensor.

So in order for the E500 to focus closer at the same field of view, it must move the lens much further away from the sensor. Now at some point the designers have decided that enough is enough. And I guess you get somewhere in the 25cm to 50cm from an object with the E500.

you can overcome this issue by three means I know of

1Buy a macro lens, designed to get over what I mention (a real one not a zoom lens that says macro on the side)

2 get a set of exstension tubes, they move your lens further away from the camera. Works ok but may make flaws in your optic more visible.

3 Buy some close up filter lenses. They screw into the front of your zoom, think of it like buying them reading glasses, and it tends to be the worst solution.
ellis rowell 17 2.0k United Kingdom
12 Jan 2006 10:24AM
I don't use a KM Z10 but I do use a Panasonic FZ10. With a 1 dioptre lens on the front I can focus down to 1mm. Very good for insects or tiny flowers.
crash39 15 24 England
12 Jan 2006 11:28PM
Many thanks to all who replied, I now understand a little more about these things! Nik, I didn't mean there was anything wrong with a 50mm macro, I just didn't understand why my ordinary lens wouldn't focus close up even though it's 'smaller'. No offence intended!

I think I'll save for a macro lens & meanwhile maybe try an alternative.

Anne
nikon5700ite 17 1.8k
13 Jan 2006 1:17AM
I would suggest to those who are still reading this thread that how close you can come is less important than how small a subject area you can encompass.

In fact with a pro-sumer one advantage of the CU lens is that it helps to keep you away from the subject while still getting you a tight framing by permitting you to use the full extent of your lens. Or permitting the use of a telephoto lens closer than it normally focuses.

That is why the longer focal length 1:1 macro lens for a SLR/DSLR are popular. Getting close to the subject can cause problems with shadow cast by the camera from the lightsource. Also maybe scaring the subject matter, although they seem to be fairly tolerant of huge bits of glass coming close to them Smile

Something I discovered recently, not being a DSLR owner, is that the Macro 1:1 lens is more effective in getting a small subject area on the APS DSLR rather than when used on the full frame DSLR. ie around 20x16mm v. 36x24mm
Also the numbers that CU lens go by from Nikon are rather misleading, forget the detail, but the 6T is not a 6 dioptre as you might think but only 3d.. Canon calls then 250D and 500D [4d and 2d]which is much more helpful.

My pet idea on the subject may be interesting reading.
nikon5700ite 17 1.8k
13 Jan 2006 1:18AM
I would suggest to those who are still reading this thread that how close you can come is less important than how small a subject area you can encompass.

In fact with a pro-sumer one advantage of the CU lens is that it helps to keep you away from the subject while still getting you a tight framing by permitting you to use the full extent of your lens. Or permitting the use of a telephoto lens closer than it normally focuses.

That is why the longer focal length 1:1 macro lens for a SLR/DSLR are popular. Getting close to the subject can cause problems with shadow cast by the camera from the lightsource. Also maybe scaring the subject matter, although they seem to be fairly tolerant of huge bits of glass coming close to them Smile

Something I discovered recently, not being a DSLR owner, is that the Macro 1:1 lens is more effective in getting a small subject area on the APS DSLR rather than when used on the full frame DSLR. ie around 20x16mm v. 36x24mm
Also the numbers that CU lens go by from Nikon are rather misleading, forget the detail, but the 6T is not a 6 dioptre as you might think but only 3d.. Canon calls then 250D and 500D [4d and 2d]which is much more helpful.

My pet idea on the subject may be interesting reading.
Craftysnapper 16 272
14 Jan 2006 10:38AM
Ann I have used a close up filter with the Zuiko 40-150mm lens on the E500 with very good results , I just recently brought the 50mm f/2 Zuiko Macro which is in a completely different league ..even better then my Tamron 90mm Di macro.
By the way with the 2x crop factor it is in effect a 100mm lens which is also perfect as a portrait lens as well.
crash39 15 24 England
25 Jan 2006 10:14AM
Many thanks all. I think I will invest in a 'real' macro lens for my E500. Paul, your reply has been invaluable in this decision as there don't seem to be many Olympus users out there compared to the rest! Over all, I want a long term solution & the macro lens will offer me that combined with versatility.
Craftysnapper 16 272
28 Jan 2006 1:52AM
Glad to have been of help Ann.
[ If you want to click on my profile you will see some examples of the E-500 and 50mm both macro and portrait Smile


Quote:there don't seem to be many Olympus users out there compared to the rest!

True but I think that may change in the future..at least I hope so as I have alway liked to plough my own furrow rather than follow the herd ( a bit like Olympus),I would hate to only be able to buy a Canonik in the future Wink

Paul

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