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Close-ups


videotec 14 8 United Kingdom
19 Aug 2008 12:58PM
I would like to start taking Close up's of Insects ETC and could do with some advise of the type of lens I would need (not TOO Expensive )"Remembering I am a Beginner" and eager to learn
Can any member advise please.
regards
Pete
Coleslaw 17 13.4k 28 Wales
19 Aug 2008 12:59PM

Quote:not TOO Expensive


means......?
bangalicious 14 1.3k 5 England
19 Aug 2008 1:04PM
Is this a lens for your 300D?
keith selmes 18 7.4k 1 United Kingdom
19 Aug 2008 1:10PM
The usual thing is a macro lens around 90mm or 100mm focal length, price about £400.

You can do a certain amount with a 50mm/1.8 lens and extension tubes, total cost around £140. This depends on creeping up very close, and not all insects are amenable to that.

You could just use either extension tubes or a Close Up lens on the 75-300, not sure how good that would be. Decent tube or lens sets come in the £50 to £100 range.

A slightly oddball approach would be a Jupiter 85/2 with extension tubes and adapter to canon EF, total cost less than £100. This would be a second hand Russian made lens, totally manual operation, and needs the adapter to fit a Canon camera.
strawman 18 22.2k 16 United Kingdom
19 Aug 2008 1:13PM
Tamron 90mm or Sigma 105mm should start about £280 new and about £150 2nd hand. Both are good for money, which is best???

Canon 100mm better than above but a bit more expensive. For bugs if you can afford it 150mm or 180mm macro lenses are popular.

On a budget the Sigma 70-30 APO MKII does a lot for the money.
Coleslaw 17 13.4k 28 Wales
19 Aug 2008 1:14PM
keith selmes 18 7.4k 1 United Kingdom
19 Aug 2008 1:14PM
Technique section on close up /macro equipment
keith selmes 18 7.4k 1 United Kingdom
19 Aug 2008 1:17PM
I saw a review several years ago which rated the Tamron 90mm lens very highly, optically as good as the Canon lens, but not so nice to use - the Canon 100mm was the "to die for" lens. Never have used a real macro lens myself, relying on extension tubes with good primes or a bellows unit.
Overread 14 4.1k 19 England
19 Aug 2008 1:20PM
I would strongly recomend (especially for starting out) not going lower than 90mm (the tamron) as then you start to get very small working distances - the distance between you and the bug. Not impossible to work with, but it is harder as you have more chance of scaring the bug.
When it comes to quality most companies can make a very sharp macro lens - some might have faster AF but that is not a concern for macro use as it is done almost totally with manual focusing.
Another thing is light - as you are on a tight budget you probably don't have enough for a good flash (unless you already have one) so use your popup and get some toilet paper (white!) and use some elastic band to hold it infront of the flash head - that will break up the light and reduce its harshness - like a diffuser.

There is also the EFS 60mm macro which gets good reviews and is affordable - though remember it does have a shorter working distance
Wooly 17 112 4 England
19 Aug 2008 1:38PM
I use the Nikon 105, which is not very helpful to you but my partner uses the Sigma 105, which I can highly recommend. The main advantage of using a true macro is the fine focus adjustment. Putting extension tubes on a none macro lens works fine but you don't get the fine control on focus and you do need to manual focus. I do use extension tubes on my macro lens to get in even closer and they are well worth having.

Be prepared for a lot of disappointment, macro photography is one of the hardest to master IMO.

Alan
Coleslaw 17 13.4k 28 Wales
19 Aug 2008 1:40PM

Quote:but you don't get the fine control on focus and you do need to manual focus


Not sure if I agree on that completely, TBH.
MeanGreeny 17 3.7k England
19 Aug 2008 1:45PM

Quote:but you don't get the fine control on focus and you do need to manual focus.



Quote:Not sure if I agree on that completely, TBH.


I do, the threads upon which the focusing mechanism is driven on a macro lens have a much finer pitch than a normal lens - thats why they focus slower [but usually more accurately].
Coleslaw 17 13.4k 28 Wales
19 Aug 2008 1:52PM
Well, I have used it, I don't need to manual focus, and I have no problem with controlling the focus though.
But I am not good at technical stuff anyway, so, I could be well wrong... Smile
videotec 14 8 United Kingdom
19 Aug 2008 3:01PM
Many Thanks everone for your information,I find it very helpful.
I was considering a price of around £200 ish
videotec 14 8 United Kingdom
19 Aug 2008 3:09PM

Quote:Is this a lens for your 300D?
yes it is.
thanks for you reply
Pete

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