Darkroom Chemicles - Oxidation?


WilliamRoar 12 188 United Kingdom
16 Jun 2011 6:45PM
As a student, I don't have the cash to buy lots of chemicals, so I want to keep them as long as possible.

I know developer (Ilford Multigrade) can only last a day (or even two) in a tray, but what about stop bath (Ilfostop) and fixer (Ilford Rapid Fixer)?

Thanks,
Will


Trays are 810 and can hold 1L when half-full.
Thinking about getting some cardboard for a lid

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KenTaylor 15 3.1k 2 United Kingdom
16 Jun 2011 6:58PM
Stop bath is fine.
It becomes exhausted often indicated as yellow but not as critical as the developer. The stop and fix can last days while thinking it might be a good idea to pour into a bottles..
You could cover it with a plastic bag.

Its not good practice to have so many prints in the stop bath or the fix which should be removed at the given time not forgetting the agitation.
With the stop bath its only less than a minute.
SlowSong Plus
11 8.6k 30 England
16 Jun 2011 7:00PM
You can get good plastic bottles to store chemicals in. Fill them up to the top and they'll be airtight. Stop bath lasts a while longer than dev but don't keep the fix too long as it won't do its job properly.
chris.maddock 18 3.7k United Kingdom
16 Jun 2011 7:01PM
Best to store the chemicals in bottles - accordion bottles (which squash down so you can expel all the air) used to be available and probably still are.
Failing that, suitable bottles and a bag of marbles to raise the liquid level to the top of the neck will serve the same purpose.

edit - Speedgraphic do the accordion bottles, 4.25 for the 1 litre size, 6.25 for the 2 litre.
JJGEE 15 7.7k 18 England
16 Jun 2011 7:02PM

Quote:thinking it might be a good idea to pour into a bottles..

I used to use those black plastic concertina style bottles.... from I think Jobo or Paterson... doubt if you can get them these days but way back yonder even Jessops sold them ! !
cameracat 16 8.6k 61 Norfolk Island
16 Jun 2011 7:04PM
Will, If you can organise some airtight containers, Then pour your chemicals into them when day is done, You may get more life out of them.....Smile

Also don't use so much in the trays, Just enough to immerse your paper with maybe the aid of a squeegie or tongs....Whatever, But don't use the same item for all trays.....Grin

Also keep the stored chemicals in a lightproof enviroment, Again each thing gives you a little more service life.

Its been so long since I did any darkroom work, I can't remember my exact procedures, The above is fairly standard advise.

Wink

EDIT: Darn it I is so slow at typing these days, I has been beaten to all of it, By almost everyone on the site.......Sad

Must try harder......Sad
KenTaylor 15 3.1k 2 United Kingdom
16 Jun 2011 7:07PM
Any plastic bottle will do but make sure you LABEL them.
KenTaylor 15 3.1k 2 United Kingdom
16 Jun 2011 7:13PM

Quote:Speedgraphic do the accordion bottles, 4.25 for the 1 litre size, 6.25 for the 2 litre.

As a student Sad
SlowSong Plus
11 8.6k 30 England
16 Jun 2011 7:39PM

Quote:Any plastic bottle will do but make sure you LABEL them.
Blimey, yes. Rule No. 1. I've made that mistake myself. Grin Mind you, I did enjoy smelling them to see what was what. Wink
chris.maddock 18 3.7k United Kingdom
16 Jun 2011 8:03PM

Quote:Speedgraphic do the accordion bottles, 4.25 for the 1 litre size, 6.25 for the 2 litre.
As a student Sad



OK, roughly a couple of pints for the smaller one, three pints for the larger Tongue
Snapper Plus
15 4.4k 3 United States Outlying Islands
16 Jun 2011 8:25PM
They're regularly available on eBay at modest prices, but maybe even a wanted ad in the Classifieds on here might get you something. Tell them you want it free because you're young! Wink
thewilliam 11 6.1k
16 Jun 2011 10:44PM
Remember that it's only the developer that oxidises during storage. It works by oxidising during use. Some plastics, such as PET are oxygen permeable, so glass is best for storage. We used to discard the dev after each session.

Most stop baths are based on acetic acid and have a very long shelf life. Fixer also lasts ages. If you leave stop or fix in an open tray, it'll evaporate and gather dust, so a lid is advisable. We used to put a sheet of glass on top of the stop and fix trays. You could smooth the sharp edges with wet or dry abrasive paper.

It's a good idea to test the silver content of the fix - we used estimating papers and I still have some left. The other way is to time how long a 35mm film tongue takes to clear. Discard the bath when the clearing time has doubled.

Even better, use two fixer baths with the older one first.
spaceman 15 5.3k 3 Wales
16 Jun 2011 11:17PM
Champion chemistry is far cheaper than Ilford and it does the same thing.

If you're using RC (resin coated) paper your fixer can be re-used a number of times but FB paper is more demanding.
spaceman 15 5.3k 3 Wales
16 Jun 2011 11:23PM
I get my chemistry bottles from this place. They do every size you could want and they're dirt cheap.
Sooty_1 9 1.5k 221 United Kingdom
17 Jun 2011 11:40AM
If you get several different sized pop bottles, you can squeeze them to expel the air. 2L Coke/lemonade bottles are good, as are 1L for smaller amounts.

As Above....LABEL them every time (masking tape + felt tip are good).

Much cheapness!!

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