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Do you have a question for the EIZO team of experts?


25 Jun 2014 10:08AM
Hi guys,

EIZO are giving you the opportunity to ask their team of experts questions so if you want advice on a particular monitor, want to learn more about colour calibration or have any other question you think EIZO can help with, please post them here.

You'll have the opportunity to post your questions here before we collect all of the questions together to send over to EIZO.

Once sent, please allow up to 1 month to receive a response to your question(s).

We will post the answers in this forum as well as in an article on-site.

I hope you find this opportunity useful!

Thanks,

Nik.

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someone 2 2 United Kingdom
23 Jul 2014 12:57PM
Hi,

What is the difference between an EIZO monitor and a similar Dell Ultrasharp monitor? As I've read they both use IPS panels?

What does wide-gamut mean?

Are you planning on releasing a 4K monitor, and what kind of computer would I need to use a 4K monitor?

Thanks

William
jtwier 2 4
4 Aug 2014 8:18PM
I shoot landscape photography and process images for printing on an Epson 9900 (ProPhoto RGB) and post on the web (sRGB). I recently purchased CG277 for its custom internal calibration. There seems to be many variables with the monitor and little or conflicting guidance in the manual. Thus, I have a few questions:

If I want to print using ProPhoto RGB, I am assuming I customize the calibration with ProPhoto RGB as the starting point. At the point in the calibration process to “verify” - what do I use to “verify”?

Once I have custom calibrated the monitor do I use the Custom or RGB mode on the Monitor to work from?

Once I have custom calibrated the monitor, in Photoshop what color space / profile do I work from?
jtwier 2 4
4 Aug 2014 8:22PM
If I have processed a photograph in (ProPhoto RGB) for printing using the custom internal calibration based on ProPhoto RGB – and want to modify my image for the web (sRGB) what is the correct workflow?

Do I simply change the monitor to sRGB?
Chris_L 3 3.7k United Kingdom
4 Aug 2014 11:45PM
Use Save For Web and allow Photoshop to convert to sRGB.

Best analogy is cake baking.

ProPhoto RGB is like a big mixing bowl, a wide gamut monitor is like a big table. Yours is wide and you can get most of that bowl on your table. It's best that all the ingredients are mixed in the big bowl (never having to remove some to make space for others).

When the mixture is ready you can think of Save For Web as popping the final cake into the oven. It's not as wide as the bowl it came from but still fits on your table, no need to make your table smaller by going to sRGB mode.
jtwier 2 4
5 Aug 2014 2:43AM
Chris, thanks for the comment and a analogy, but I did not ask my question correctly. I know how to convert to sRGB and the impact of the change.

The question is - when you have correctly developing your image in ProPhoto RGB for printing and the switch to sRGB (to post on the web) there is usually a color shift. My question is using the monitor modes - how can I pre visualize the color shift from ProPhoto to sRGB - so I can correct the sRGB colors to appear as close as possible to the original ProPhoto RGB?

Do I change the mode to sRGB and then readjust? If not, what is the sRGB mode for?

Thanks again.
GlennH 11 1.9k 1 France
5 Aug 2014 8:31AM
Personally I wouldn't use any internal ProPhoto RGB profile for editing, because no monitor is anywhere near capable of natively displaying it (my question for Eizo might ask what that mode is for). You should ideally edit in the monitor's native colour space with a customised profile, and if you need to see what sRGB looks like before converting you'd softproof (preview) it using a program such as Lightroom of Photoshop (full version). Classic technique involves duplicating the image and editing the second alongside the original in "proof colours" so you can match colour (something you can't do by switching to the monitor's sRGB profile). However, the rendering intent used will automatically try to match out-of-gamut colours, and it will very often do a better job of it than the photographer. It's impossible to literally replace the colours you've lost when converting down.

The sRGB mode is useful for viewing images in non-colour-managed browsers and programs. Without it, colours will appear over-saturated in those environments. Most browsers these days are colour-managed by default, so they're less problematic than they used to be.
Chris_L 3 3.7k United Kingdom
5 Aug 2014 3:52PM
I agree with Glenn, (apart from where he says "Most browsers these days are colour-managed by default" Safari and Chrome colour manage only if the image contains an embedded profile. Otherwise they don't do any colour management)

The sRGB mode will be useful for watching YouTube videos and other things (such as Flash games / animation) that a colour-managed browser still gets wrong
GlennH 11 1.9k 1 France
5 Aug 2014 4:25PM

Quote:I agree with Glenn, (apart from where he says "Most browsers these days are colour-managed by default" Safari and Chrome colour manage only if the image contains an embedded profile. Otherwise they don't do any colour management)


By definition, Chris, colour management requires profiles. Any browser that is capable of recognising an embedded profile in an image and mapping it to the monitor profile is colour managed. Internet Explorer is the only browser incapable of that, because it reads the incoming profile but ignores the monitor profile (a ridiculous half-measure that assumes all monitors to be sRGB).

I won't take up any more space in this thread discussing this--moderators feel free to remove my two posts here if they are in the way.
Chris_L 3 3.7k United Kingdom
5 Aug 2014 4:32PM
Remove mine too, but Glenn like you to discuss this in the other thread
jtwier 2 4
6 Aug 2014 5:22PM
Thanks for the comment above. Very helpful.

As mentioned I shoot landscape photography and want to make the best use of my CG277 for printing on my Epson 9900. Here is what I think I have learned to best calibrate.

Use the Color Nav software to custom calibrate
Create New Target - Manual
Gamut - ProPhoto RGB or native Monitor?
Brightness - 60 (as I often print too dark)
White point - D65
Set Black - Min
Tone Curve 1.8
Priority - standard

Process and validate target of Basic RGB?

Any comments would be appreciated.
Pook 2 3
7 Aug 2014 8:52PM
I calibrate the above screen using Color Navigator and a X-rite i1 Display Pro. Results seems good.

However, why does colour navigator also write a .icc profile to the PC and set this as default colourspace for the GPU? Surely if the MONITOR's LUT is programmed, then the screen is accurate regardless of input?

Also, manipulating the 8bit output of my GPU would surely introduce banding on fine gradients, as manipulating a 8bit histogram always does.

Why does it insist on saving this ICC profile and and that Windows set it as default? Surely if the screen is calibrated, what I actually want is a clean, unmolested 8 bit output from my GPU?
atanase 5 1 United Kingdom
13 Aug 2014 9:01PM
Hello,

I have purchased my Eizo CG277 less than a month ago and I'm having two issues so far.

First when I calibrate it with the built in monitor I get a green tinge, however using the Spyder 4 with the Eizo software gives me better results. Can the built-in colour meter be replaced?

One other issue is that the monitor doesn't display all the blacks/shadows. I did a few tests and out of 10 patches it only shows the brightest 4. How is this possible, my iMac manages to show all of them.

Both monitors iMac and Eizo are calibrated to these settings: 85 cd/m2 brightness, 2.2 gamma and 6500 white point.

Can someone enlighten me a bit please.

Many thanks!
14 Aug 2014 8:27AM
Hello,

Thank you for submitting all of your questions.

I've sent them over to EIZO and will update this forum when I have a response (please allow up to 1 month to receive a response).

Thanks again,

Nikita.
10 Sep 2014 10:49AM
Here are the responses from the EIZO team in regards to the questions asked in this forum:

What is the difference between an EIZO monitor and a similar Dell Ultrasharp monitor? As I've read they both use IPS panels?

The difference in an EIZO ColorEdge monitor begins with the design, there are EIZO ASICs that are dedicated to bringing the maximum image performance in displaying your work. Every EIZO ColorEdge is calibrated in the factory before it begins the journey to your desk, so you know the results will be accurate. We even measure the ambient temperature so the monitor is responding to your environment. The IPS panels used by EIZO are manufactured to our specifications, delivering distinctly more accurate display of the photograph or video than other monitors.


What does wide gamut mean?
The term wide gamut is commonly used to describe a colour space that is larger than sRGB, if you shoot raw files then you should be viewing and editing in Adobe 1998 as this is the standard colour space for raw files. You can see below how much larger the Adobe triangle is to the sRGB, this size difference is what is meant by widegamut.

graph.jpg




What kind of computer would I need to use a 4K monitor?
Lets work backwards from the monitor, the first item you need is a capable video card and this should support either DisplayPort version 1.2 or HDMI that supports 4K. The computer needs to be able to support the video card and the type of content you want to display, that includes the disk subsystem which needs to deliver a continuous 8 megapixel image to the monitor.

Simply, the more performance you purchase the more you will be able to do with the 4K! Editing photographs will not be very strenuous on the system and you’ll be able to use an up to date tower system with the right video card. However, if you going to be shooting video or creating animations for example then you’ll be needing more horsepower.


If I want to print using ProPhoto RGB, I am assuming I customize the calibration with ProPhoto RGB as the starting point. At the point in the calibration process to “verify” what do I use to “verify”?

There is a catch in using ProPhoto colour space that may not be immediately obvious, it is understandable to want the maximum that can technically delivered, but not at the expense of creative quality. The RAW file is by default Adobe 98, yes in areas it may capture more colour but that additional coverage is not uniform and the converters will almost certainly process it to Adobe 98.

When you begin to edit the file the maximum display colour space (native) is only slightly larger than Adobe 98. The result if you set your colour space to ProPhoto, there is colour you cannot see on an image that only contains colour that is in the Adobe 98 colour space. If you now make edits to your photographs you are effectively working with the invisible, because the monitor cannot display the full prophoto colour space.

The recommended process would be to set the colour space to Adobe 98 consistently through your workflow, the validation you should use is the standard RGB.

Once I have custom calibrated the monitor do I use the Custom or RGB mode on the Monitor to work from?

When you calibrate an EIZO ColorEdge monitor with the EIZO ColorNavigator software it will leave the monitor on the correct CAL mode. Unless you have a reason to use the factory mode settings, it is best to leave this in the CAL mode assigned by the software.


Once I have custom calibrated the monitor, in Photoshop what color space / profile do I work from?
This depends on the photographs and what you intend to do with them, may I recomend the EIZO colour management handbook as a good starting point.

When you have correctly developing your image in ProPhoto RGB for printing and the switch to sRGB (to post on the web) there is usually a color shift. My question is using the monitor modes how can I pre visualize the color shift from ProPhoto to sRGB so I can correct the sRGB colors to appear as close as possible to the original ProPhoto RGB? Do I change the mode to sRGB and then readjust? If not, what is the sRGB mode for?

If you make a duplicate of an image created in Adobe 98 and then in photoshop convert the copy to sRGB you will be able to clearly see what Photoshop has done to the colours. You can now make creative corrections to the sRGB copy to make it better match your expectations, this is all achieved in photoshop without touching the monitor settings.

The sRGB mode is to allow you to see content as though the monitor could only display the colours of sRGB. This is not effective if you want to compare sRGB to Adobe 98 as the colours are restricted (filtered) in sRGB mode.


I calibrate the above screen using Color Navigator and a Xrite i1 Display Pro. Results seems good. However, why does colour navigator also write a .icc profile to the PC and set this as default colourspace for the GPU? Surely if the MONITOR's LUT is programmed, then the screen is accurate regardless of input?

Why does it insist on saving this ICC profile and that Windows set it as default? Surely if the screen is calibrated, what I actually want is a clean, unmolested 8 bit output from my GPU?


The monitor calibration or factory setting will display the computer's output accurately the ICC profile is to ensure the computer is outputting the required colourspace and not a random colour space and gamma curve.

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