GB Sports Photographer & The Panasonic LUMIX S1

Eizo 277


RBL 6 53 United Kingdom
31 Mar 2018 7:45PM
Hi I have an Eizo 277 monitor. Could anyone advise me what brightness and white point settings I should have for printing? I have downloaded the relevant ICC profiles for the hahnemule papers I am using but the prints are too dark. Is there a display profile I should download as opposed to a printer profile? Richard

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justin c 15 5.0k 36 England
31 Mar 2018 8:25PM
There isn't a definite setting as it depends on your working environment, i.e. how bright it is etc. I use a brightness setting of 90 and a colour temperature of 6500 which works very well for me when matching prints to screen.
You don't download a monitor profile. You calibrate your monitor with a monitor calibration device which will then automatically create the profile. This will be loaded automatically each time you start your computer.
Prints appearing too dark could point towards a monitor which is too bright and/or viewing your prints in inadequate lighting.
Try a brightness setting of 90 and a colour of temperature of 6500. Make a test print, view it in decent light, compare it to a soft proofed image on screen and you can then further tweak your monitor's settings during calibration if you feel it's needed.
I assume you are calibrating your monitor with a hardware device. If not, you're missing out on an essential first step.
lemmy 12 2.8k United Kingdom
31 Mar 2018 8:25PM
I have an Eizo, not that model. I use sRGB and calibrate the monitor. Then get test prints done and see how they match. Keep doing that and making adjustments until they do match. 100 to 120cdm is best for brightness. The black and white points are set by the calibration.

I've tried all sorts of methods over the years but calibration, always editing in the same light conditions, giving the monitor 30 mins to stabilise plus soft proofing in Lightroom and always using the same print house(I like Metro in Clerkenwell Road). But its always a bit suck it and see at first.

You go to all that trouble and then find yourself showing show them to someone under fluorescent light Sad
RBL 6 53 United Kingdom
1 Apr 2018 8:26AM
OK. Thanks so much for taking the time to respond. I am using the in built calibration device and quick colour match with Epson print layout. I can try to get a reference print from Metro. Any tips on the best papers to use for bright rich colours on landscapes. Thanks everyone and Hapoy Easter! Richard
Philh04 Plus
14 2.1k United Kingdom
1 Apr 2018 8:58AM
There is no predefined luminance level for your monitor to match your print, it all depends on where you are going to view it and the lighting conditions in that location. It will also depend on the level of ambient light where you work, as Lemmy says consistent is best. The figure can be anything from 80cdM^2 to around 110cdM^2, the often suggested 120cdM^2 is usually too high.

You should aim, in most circumstances for D65 rather than 6500K.

Download a reference file from the internet to determine your own optimum luminance. Try here...

http://www.digitaldog.net/tips/index.shtml

As your prints are too dark then your monitor is most certainly too bright.

You don't say what software you are printing from and how you are using the downloaded profiles, the usual workflow is to soft proof using the correct profile, adjust that soft proof to ensure an acceptable print, save that soft proofed file as your print file (No need for that step if using Lightroom) print your saved file using the same profile and ensuring that colour management is disabled in the printer driver. Using ink/paper/profiles correctly is integral to achieving good prints.

Two points to remember... you will never get an exact match as you are looking at transmitted light as opposed to reflected light and the profiles you are using are generic and not specific, as you proceed you may find it useful to have specific profiles made for your printer/paper/ink combination.

As for choice of paper, that is really largely a personal matter, but for rich bright colours I would possibly look at a semi-gloss or luster surface.

HTH Oh and a Happy Easter to you too.
Philh04 Plus
14 2.1k United Kingdom
1 Apr 2018 9:54AM
A quick addition to my post above... if you are looking to rich, bright colours in your print it may be a good idea to keep an eye on the gamut warnings whilst soft proofing and trying both perceptual and relative rendering intents, they both treat out of gamut colours in a different way...
JJGEE 14 7.6k 18 England
1 Apr 2018 10:21AM
Maybe experimenting with L of L*a*b readouts to judge brightness could help.

Probably easier to do an internet search for more detailed information than me attempting to explain it.
Philh04 Plus
14 2.1k United Kingdom
1 Apr 2018 10:46AM

Quote:Maybe experimenting with L of L*a*b readouts to judge brightness could help.

Probably easier to do an internet search for more detailed information than me attempting to explain it.


That is an interesting idea, however I am not sure how it would work in practice as you would need a reference and also a way to read the L* Luminance value from the print (I think).

CIE L*a*b is simply a mathematically defined colour space, its use these days is more valuable in the conversion from one colour space to another, along with CIE XYZ it acts as a 'translator'...
lemmy 12 2.8k United Kingdom
1 Apr 2018 12:45PM

Quote: The figure can be anything from 80cdM^2 to around 110cdM^2, the often suggested 120cdM^2 is usually too high.

Yes, I agree. I find 100 about right for my eyes with 90 a little too dark. Apparently many general purpose monitors won't go below about 250.

The sheer subjectivity of visual perception is very interesting. Your eyes adapt to pretty much anything so that if your monitor is set bright the brain adapts to see that as normal and professional settings as dark and dull. And vice versa.

I always think of the tinted windows in a car. When you look out at a blue sky or a red post box they all look normal. Wind down the window suddenly and they have a strong pinkish tint for a few seconds until they brain removes its filtering and the colours appear normal. Wind up the window and it has a greenish tinge until the brain brings in its filters again. As Shakespeare said, "there is nothing good or bad but thinking makes it so".
RBL 6 53 United Kingdom
2 Apr 2018 8:03AM
Thanks everyone. I知 set to 90 c and 6500 and I am working out how to soft proof. Presumably I can save the changes I make to the soft proof and print that? Should I order/download a test print? Richard
Philh04 Plus
14 2.1k United Kingdom
2 Apr 2018 8:43AM

Quote:Thanks everyone. I知 set to 90 c and 6500 and I am working out how to soft proof. Presumably I can save the changes I make to the soft proof and print that? Should I order/download a test print? Richard

You can download a reference print from the link in my first post, you will also find information on soft proofing there.
You don't say what software you are using, Lightroom gives you and option to create a virtual copy for soft proofing, in Photoshop it is good practice to duplicate your file. Soft proofing is simply a simulation of how your file will print when using that particular profile and allows you to optimise that file for the best result.
RBL 6 53 United Kingdom
2 Apr 2018 9:26AM
Thank you for this. I have both Lightroom and PS but have been using Photoshop. I found a helpful you tube clip on digital dog which showed me how to soft proof.
daniel66 3 61 United Kingdom
2 Apr 2018 11:07PM
Andrew Rodney (aka digital dog) and Jeff Schewe both set their monitors to 150 cd/mイ, I believe, so it's not strictly necessary to go low with luminance. Higher settings are generally used when the photographer uses a booth or dedicated print viewing area, whereas lower settings are preferred by those that hold up prints next to the screen for comparison. For a lot of people using consumer-level monitors (not typically Eizo), reducing luminance to a very low level is not an especially good idea. You ideally want to keep it a hardware adjustment that is achieved purely by dimming the backlighting.

RBL 6 53 United Kingdom
3 Apr 2018 7:39AM
Ok. Does this mean I should keep my room dark but rely on the printing calibration settings in the in built calibration tool? I was wondering if I should use different settings depending on the paper I am using and whether I am printing in black and white or colour.

I知 most grateful to all of you for taking time to talk me through this. Richard
justin c 15 5.0k 36 England
3 Apr 2018 8:28AM
It's not necessary to work in a totally dark room when editing images. The most important thing is not to have any bright light or bright colours directly hitting the monitor screen. I prefer to work in a darkened room with a blackout blind elliminating any bright daylight coming through the window. I have the main ceiling light off but have a single desk lamp positioned behind the monitor with the light bouncing off of the wall or ceiling. This gives a nice darkened environment with no light hitting the screen but with enough soft light to be able to see the keys on the keyboard.
I'm not sure I understand the other questions but if you're referring to soft proof adjustments, then yes, you would use different settings as they're very much specific to each image and also to the paper being used.
If your printer has an Advanced Black and White setting then you'll find this works very well on black and white images.


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