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English question :


MikeRC 16 3.6k United Kingdom
17 Jan 2009 10:56AM
Hi...I've just finished reading a book and on the back the blurb reads....

...."A powerful plot (with) an unexpected and brilliant climax"

Why is the word "with" in brackets ?

thanks....Mike
User_Removed 14 2.2k 3 United Kingdom
17 Jan 2009 11:11AM
Is it part of a quote taken from somewhere else ?
Snapper 16 4.5k 3 United States Outlying Islands
17 Jan 2009 11:20AM
The quote is a part of a longer sentence or paragraph where they've cut words out to make the quote better, but they need the word in brackets so that it makes sense when you read it. Probably!
keith selmes 17 7.4k 1 United Kingdom
17 Jan 2009 11:35AM
I think Snapper has it.
dwilkin 14 24.3k United Kingdom
17 Jan 2009 12:53PM
that would be my interpretation, too.
Tooth 16 5.8k 227 Ireland
17 Jan 2009 1:23PM
Which means the quote might actually have been..

"a powerful plot would have made all the difference to this half hearted so-so cops-and-robbers story. As it is we have to contend with grey, plastic characters and a story line so predictable you could just read the first and back page and leave out the middle and have a sandwich and a long walk instead. In fact a long walk out with your dog has more chance than this offering of providing an unexpected and brilliant climax."

Just a thought Wink Smile
pj.morley 18 947 United Kingdom
17 Jan 2009 1:50PM
When a short piece is quoted from a longer sentence, sometimes the construction is lost so brackets might also be used to change an existing word into one that makes more sense in the selected text. Maybe to change tense or to correct grammar. However, to legitimately keep it as a quote, only the changed part is highlighted

Doing this can add impact to the original quote which in its original form may have been relatively weak.

Therefore

"The author has provided us with a powerful plot and an unexpected and brilliant climax"

becomes

"... a powerful plot (with) an unexpected and brilliant climax"

The ellipsis (...) at the beginning tells us there was more to the quote before this part but again it was probably removed for a better impact. After all it's the blurb that sells the book.

I suppose it's the equivalent of a film trailer where they only show you the best bits. Then when you go to see the film it turns out be complete rubbish. Apart from the bits that were in the trailer.
SuziBlue 18 16.2k 10 Scotland
17 Jan 2009 2:11PM

Quote:Which means the quote might actually have been..

"a powerful plot would have made all the difference to this half hearted so-so cops-and-robbers story. As it is we have to contend with grey, plastic characters and a story line so predictable you could just read the first and back page and leave out the middle and have a sandwich and a long walk instead. In fact a long walk out with your dog has more chance than this offering of providing an unexpected and brilliant climax."

Just a thought



I think Tooth has it Smile hehe
RogBrown 14 3.1k 10 England
17 Jan 2009 2:41PM

Quote:I think Tooth has it hehe

I know that was tongue-in-cheek & somewhat exaggerated but that's exactly what does happen!!
dwilkin 14 24.3k United Kingdom
17 Jan 2009 2:48PM

Quote:I know that was tongue-in-cheek & somewhat exaggerated but that's exactly what does happen!!


When they're not just making up the quote from whole cloth!
SuziBlue 18 16.2k 10 Scotland
17 Jan 2009 2:58PM
Some publishing houses even pay other authors to do reviews so you're not exactly going to have one author reviewer running down another's work if you're being paid ..
MikeRC 16 3.6k United Kingdom
17 Jan 2009 9:02PM
Oh I see...I think....thank you everyone :

"Tooth"....an excellent, amuseing and probably true, example :

.....Mike

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