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Exporting photos from lightroom.


JJGEE 15 7.8k 18 England
20 Nov 2020 8:00AM

Quote:I
I always export as 16 bit Tiff files and convert to jpeg in Photoshop.
This may not be the totally right way but it works for me.



Why the extra step of creating the jpeg in Photoshop instead of directly from Lightroom ?
chase Plus
15 1.9k 480 England
20 Nov 2020 8:13AM

Quote:Why the extra step of creating the jpeg in Photoshop instead of directly from Lightroom ?

Because I do most of my post processing in photoshop, it just suits me much better, I don't convert to a jpeg until everything is finished.
Jestertheclown 12 8.3k 253 England
20 Nov 2020 2:46PM

Quote:Why the extra step of creating the jpeg in Photoshop instead of directly from Lightroom ?

That's also the way that I usually do it although it does depend on how important or otherwise, the image is to me.

The reason that I save (from Capture One, I don't use Lightroom) initially, as Tiffs., is that they haven't been degraded in the same way that Jpegs are and should, in theory, at least, contain more data.

To be honest, I'm not sure that it really makes any difference.
clevercloggs 16 249 11 Netherlands
20 Nov 2020 5:25PM
Hi Janet,

thank you for that good tip.
I'll do as you suggest. i then have all the LR photos as end or inbetween result in one file.
I'll transport them as TIFF into that file...and take it from there..

According to LR whatever you do in their programme it does not alter the original photo, all changes and adjustments are done in LR but not done to the original. Is that still the case after you saved it as TIFF (in this case)?
Which means that i could go back to the original and do for instance another crop?

Prior to LR i just had the originals stored in a folder with the date of the day the photo's were taken. i then would do make a copy of the image and do a RAW conversion of that and then move to PS.
Now that i have all originals stored in LR i feel that i have only 1 shot at processing with only one original...whereas previously i would try out various options.

Your experience and advise is more then welcome,

Thank you,

Robert
chase Plus
15 1.9k 480 England
20 Nov 2020 5:43PM
Hi Robert,

Quote:Is that still the case after you saved it as TIFF (in this case)?

Always export the Tiffs to a separate folder.
Ok so here's the full workflow...
1. I create a folder in 'my pictures' and name with something easily remembered, date, subject etc.
2. Before doing anything else, within that new folder I create another folder named 'Tiffs"...it's obviously empty at this time.
Close the whole lot.
3. I then plug in my memory card and navigate to my Raw files.
4. Drag and drop the Raw files into the first folder I created...not the one named tiffs.
5. Open Lightroom and check 'Import photos and videos' navigate to the folder containing the Raw files, check 'all ' and import.
6. Sort the Raw files in lightroom, whatever I decide to do to them.
7. Select 'all' and click on the export button.
8. Navigate to the empty folder named Tiffs and make sure the correct options for exporting are checked..ie : export as 16 bit tiffs.

The result is, I keep my original Raw files and my 16 bit Tiffs are in the same location but separate from the Raw stuff.
Then into Photoshop and I save everything I do as 'a copy' so even the original tiff files are not affected.
All done....save as a copy jpeg in the same folder as the tiffs.

I end up with 2 files inside the original folder, one containing the Raw files and the other containing the tiff and jpegs.

That sounds long winded but it works for me, trust me, it doesn't take as long to do that long as it has taken me to write this Wink
Phew...HTH

Others may disagree with my method but, as I have said, it works for me, files don't get mixed up and I can revisit the Raw files when ever I want to.
clevercloggs 16 249 11 Netherlands
23 Nov 2020 9:23AM
Hi Janet,

i understand it.
i just thought that LR was the beginning and end of it all. Hence my apprehension in saving photos as I thought in LR i would have only 1 shot at processing into a final result.

What you seem to be doing is a 3 step process:
1) save original images (the raw files) into a normal folder. Then
2) import these into LR, where you can process an image into your liking or whatever you fancy,
3) save as TIFF outside LR for further processing into PS or if you like for printing or placing on ephotozine.

i have a feeling i am doing steps 1 and 2 already, (normal LR routine?) but not step 3..(a saved photo by me stays somewhere in LR).

This would mean that if i would like to do another version of an image. I would produce a copy of the original raw file and then import that into LR and then do step 2 and 3...(which seems a bit tedious and time consuming).
or
is it as I suggested, that you can reverse all the processing steps in LR with the first original and start all over as LR's processing is non destructive...meaning the original RAW is not affected at all..and then at the end of that processing session you can save that result as a TIFF next to the first one you already saved..

Apologies for being so exact about things but me not grasping this part stops me from processing any photos at the moment as i worry that i may have altered the original, simply by saving it after i processed the image...which some how goes against the LR statement that their software is non destructive....

Robert
Railcam 14 877 2 Scotland
23 Nov 2020 11:20AM
You seem to be making this more complicated than it really is. Perhaps I can clarify a few thimgs for you.

Your RAW image from the camera is in a file.
When you "Import" the RAW file into LR, you are not actually importing the file. What LR is doing is making a note of where that RAW is (its address) in your filing system and it produces a thumbnail. The address and thumbnail are saved in the LR Catalogue.

When you select an image to process, LR brings in the full resolution RAW and then any changes you make (brightness, contrast, white balance etc. etc.) are saved as adjustments within the catalogue.

Finally, in the Library module you can export the modified file. LR applies the adjustments to a copy of the RAW and generates a TIFF, JPG, PNG as you instructed and saves that wherever you told it to.

When you close LR, your RAW is still in your filng system (unaltered) and the LR Catalogue contains the location of the RAW, the thumbnail and the adjustments.

If you have exported a TIFF (say, for printing) but then you ant a small JPG for social media then open LR, select the picture from the Library and then Export it again but this time in the Export dialogue tell it you want a JPG, where to put it what size etc. You do not need to re-process the RAW.

I hope this helps to simplify things for you.

Regards
Keith
justin c 16 5.1k 36 England
23 Nov 2020 1:27PM

Quote:Hi Janet,

i understand it.
i just thought that LR was the beginning and end of it all. Hence my apprehension in saving photos as I thought in LR i would have only 1 shot at processing into a final result.

This would mean that if i would like to do another version of an image. I would produce a copy of the original raw file and then import that into LR and then do step 2 and 3...(which seems a bit tedious and time consuming).
or
is it as I suggested, that you can reverse all the processing steps in LR with the first original and start all over as LR's processing is non destructive...meaning the original RAW is not affected at all..and then at the end of that processing session you can save that result as a TIFF next to the first one you already saved..

Robert



You only import your raw file into Lightroom once. If you want to make a few variations of that file, you don't make another copy of your raw file and import that as well. Import your raw file into Lightroom, as you're already doing and then just make virtual copies within Lightroom. You can then try out different processing styles and adjustments and make as many copies as you like.
You will still have just the one original raw file, but as many virtual copies as you want to make.
clevercloggs 16 249 11 Netherlands
23 Nov 2020 6:54PM
all right, thanks to Janet, Keith and Justin, i finally understood how this bit of LR works and what i need to do.

i'll try the making of multiple copies within LR of the same RAW. which would then allow me to try out various frame sizes, bl&w and colour variations and on and on and on...Grin

One last question on the copying of the same RAW...Normally i want to try an alternative version of the same RAW, only after i made one. meaning that only afterprocessing and image i know if i want another copy of the original to try another one. I assume that copying then still works as Justin explained?

Robert
justin c 16 5.1k 36 England
23 Nov 2020 10:24PM
Yes, you can make virtual copies at any stage, before, during or after processing. If you want to start from scratch, just make a virtual copy and reset all adjustments.
clevercloggs 16 249 11 Netherlands
24 Nov 2020 2:23PM
excellent,

thank you all for your patience in explaining to me something i perceived as a hurdle in LR.

Robert
Railcam 14 877 2 Scotland
24 Nov 2020 6:04PM
I am pleased that we were able to help. I often say that Lightroom is quite simple, but has a lot in it to learn. So, onwards and upwards.

Good luck
Keith

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