External vs internal


uganda 11 28 United Kingdom
13 Jan 2018 6:21PM
The likes of X-Rite and Datacolor seem to provide an affordable means of calibrating monitors - but I have come across some monitors claiming to be “self calibrating”.

I know that these may seem like fairly basic questions, but...

(Putting the money aspect aside), how accurate/reliable are the monitors? Can they be relied upon without the use of a external device?

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justin c 14 5.0k 36 England
13 Jan 2018 8:02PM
If the self calibrating ones that you're referring to are Eizo and NEC (I don't remember off hand which specific models this applies to) then the answer is, yes, they will be very accurate. Eizo and NEC are at top end of image editing monitors and are amongst the best around and the standard by which other monitors are judged.
Is a self-calibrating monitor worth the large premium? For the quality, uniformity and accuracy of the screen, then perhaps, if you demand the best. Personally I wouldn't be interested in paying a large price premium just for the self-calibration alone as it's very little inconvenience just to plug in an external device, i.e. Xrite i1Display Pro every four weeks and calibrate the screen yourself.
Dave_Canon 12 1.4k United Kingdom
13 Jan 2018 10:44PM
Most modern monitors will not need calibrating too often until they near the end of their life so calibrating every 3 months will be fine. While it is good to ensure your monitor is calibrated, few calibrate their cameras which can have a lot more affect on the overall colour accuracy. I personally do not think I can justify buying an Eizo but do spend a little extra on Dell Ultrasharpmonitors and I do produce calibration profiles for each of my cameras.

Dave
LenShepherd 10 3.7k United Kingdom
14 Jan 2018 9:39AM

Quote:The likes of X-Rite and Datacolor seem to provide an affordable means of calibrating monitors - but I have come across some monitors claiming to be “self calibrating”.


They also provide around 99% of Adobe RGB colour Grin
This can be critical relative to more affordable sRGB monitors for viewing the best colour in an image and especially so for landscape greens where sRGB is particularly lacking.
Even so you need to shoot Adobe RGB in camera (usually only available as RAW) and if home printing to use a printer which reproduces near 100% of Adobe RGB. External made RGB prints do not come cheap.
For a good RGB monitor, whether self calibration or not, and a wide gamut printer budget £2,000 and up if buying new.

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