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Favourite photographers besides EPZ


andy_AHG 12 106 6 United Kingdom
17 Feb 2009 2:39PM
I guess that art is as much about the viewer's association and interpretation of the work, as it is about the act of creation. So in that sense, it is better to see that artwork as the artist intended it to be seen.

For example, Monet's Le Déjeuner sur l'Herbe seen in a book or as a postcard looks like a fairly standard 19th C French Salon painting (apart from the subject matter maybe). But if you have ever seen the original, the brushstrokes are so crude (in comparison to the acceptable standards of the era) that you can understand why it caused the storm that it did when exhibited.

However, books are still a valid popular and accessible medium. Maybe not as intense as seeing an original but I can still no the less appreciate photos reproduced at that size.

A bit like seeing a band live as opposed to buying the albums!
Alciabides 12 536 United Kingdom
17 Feb 2009 4:27PM

Quote:I guess that art is as much about the viewer's association and interpretation of the work, as it is about the act of creation. So in that sense, it is better to see that artwork as the artist intended it to be seen.

For example, Monet's Le Déjeuner sur l'Herbe seen in a book or as a postcard looks like a fairly standard 19th C French Salon painting (apart from the subject matter maybe). But if you have ever seen the original, the brushstrokes are so crude (in comparison to the acceptable standards of the era) that you can understand why it caused the storm that it did when exhibited.

However, books are still a valid popular and accessible medium. Maybe not as intense as seeing an original but I can still no the less appreciate photos reproduced at that size.

A bit like seeing a band live as opposed to buying the albums!



Agree re Monet - great example. Bands is difficult because you have 'studio' bands who deisgn their work for teh CD as opposed to bands who think of their music for live performance and the Cd as secondary (and intermediate and mixed cases as well). I wonder after teh digital revolution if we are now moving to a point where some photographers are composing their work specifically for electronic viewing rather than print viewing or even book reproduction viewing - and what difference this will amke to how we think about their work.
Kris_Dutson 18 8.2k 1 England
17 Feb 2009 4:33PM

Quote:Ansell's work is OK - but wouldn't it have been so much better if he'd used colour"!!!!!!!


He did, as it happens.
matt5791 16 747 1 United Kingdom
17 Feb 2009 5:10PM

Quote:Quote:It's a cliché, but Ansel Adams really is the ultimate for me, and I think he really was the greatest photographic craftsman.

You really need to see his prints in the flesh for full impact.Thta is very interesting - do people think that this is true in general?



In his words the negative was the score and the print the performance - the whole thing about Adams and the zone system is about visualising the finished print at the time of exposure and crafting the exposure for that visualisation. Ie. Everything was geared towards the print, which itself would be processed to the ultimate archival standard, with typical Adams throughness. A total perfectionist.

Images such as Monolith, The Face of Half Dome , an early image and the image he stated as being his first pre-visualisation, are, I think utterly stunning.
Alciabides 12 536 United Kingdom
17 Feb 2009 5:20PM

Quote:Quote:Quote:It's a cliché, but Ansel Adams really is the ultimate for me, and I think he really was the greatest photographic craftsman.

You really need to see his prints in the flesh for full impact.Thta is very interesting - do people think that this is true in general?In his words the negative was the score and the print the performance - the whole thing about Adams and the zone system is about visualising the finished print at the time of exposure and crafting the exposure for that visualisation. Ie. Everything was geared towards the print, which itself would be processed to the ultimate archival standard, with typical Adams throughness. A total perfectionist.

Images such as Monolith, The Face of Half Dome, an early image and the image he stated as being his first pre-visualisation, are, I think utterly stunning.



Strawman, where are you? See discussion under 'Is HDR cheating?' thread
User_Removed 15 4.9k England
17 Feb 2009 5:28PM

Quote:Images such as Monolith, The Face of Half Dome, an early image and the image he stated as being his first pre-visualisation, are, I think utterly stunning.


And that's an early Half Tone print.......I have to go see an Ansel Adams exhibition...if there are such in the UK
strawman 17 22.2k 16 United Kingdom
17 Feb 2009 5:30PM

Quote:Strawman, where are you?
I am here and see nothing to negate my view Smile

I went to see the recent exhibition of his work in Oxford, and very good it was. I think Addams was good at the photography and the printing side. As I said there is a craft in printing.

But still the photo is judged as presented, it matter not if he printed them or someone else did. The reaction is to the complete item. I enjoyed his photographs for what they were, not because he trailed up a mountain carrying a massive camera etc.

A good photographer could drag a modern Phase 1 back equipped camera round the same scenes and capture as interesting a photograph and print it to as high quality.

Now stick the two side by side, does the process of capturing and constructing the image matter, yes clearly. Does the process in the middle, well no, unless it looses something. Smile

The whole thing about Addams is he investigated all the elements you mention to capture and create the scene he envisaged. He was very focused on the end result. The process was used to get the result he wanted. I do not think he was a slave to the process.
strawman 17 22.2k 16 United Kingdom
17 Feb 2009 5:33PM
Col have a look, it was in Oxford last year, and I have seen one in Edinburgh also.
Alciabides 12 536 United Kingdom
17 Feb 2009 6:50PM

Quote:Quote:Strawman, where are you? I am here and see nothing to negate my view

I went to see the recent exhibition of his work in Oxford, and very good it was. I think Addams was good at the photography and the printing side. As I said there is a craft in printing.

But still the photo is judged as presented, it matter not if he printed them or someone else did. The reaction is to the complete item. I enjoyed his photographs for what they were, not because he trailed up a mountain carrying a massive camera etc.

A good photographer could drag a modern Phase 1 back equipped camera round the same scenes and capture as interesting a photograph and print it to as high quality.

Now stick the two side by side, does the process of capturing and constructing the image matter, yes clearly. Does the process in the middle, well no, unless it looses something.

The whole thing about Addams is he investigated all the elements you mention to capture and create the scene he envisaged. He was very focused on the end result. The process was used to get the result he wanted. I do not think he was a slave to the process.



But think about his words as reported, the negative as score and the print as performance - this allows that you can have different performances of the same work that are compositionally distinct and hence that the creative vision encompasses the whole process from conception to print - the process isn't just technical instrumentality, it is part of the mode of expression.
JohnParminter 14 1.3k 14 England
17 Feb 2009 7:21PM
My favourite would be Colin Prior for his panoramic Scottish mountain scenes.
strawman 17 22.2k 16 United Kingdom
17 Feb 2009 10:25PM

Quote:But think about his words as reported
I did, the score is the record of what the composer created. The creative part in that is the act of creating what is recorded. Then in the performance you have an interpretation, so again a process for creative input.

That his photographs were created in a film process is not that important. What is important is what he composed and what is presented.
andy_AHG 12 106 6 United Kingdom
17 Feb 2009 10:41PM

Quote:My favourite would be Colin Prior for his panoramic Scottish mountain scenes.


I have one of his books. Very good indeed.
strawman 17 22.2k 16 United Kingdom
17 Feb 2009 10:54PM
I am leafing through a book of Arnold Newman pictures, quite impressive works. the series of Stravinsky photo's are great, with one of them being iconic.

The Oppenhimer portrait haunts me, I would swear you can see hesitation and regret in his face, he looks troubled. the photo of Krupp looking like a Bond Villain, I guess he was a key role model.

so many portraits, and so much depth.

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