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Film photographers see more?


Pete Plus
19 18.8k 97 England
11 Nov 2014 9:42AM
Interesting quote from Keira Knightley in Interview Magazine
Quote:KNIGHTLEY: Do you still shoot on film as well?

DEMARCHELIER: Very rarely, only for special effect when I need it. Otherwise I don't do film anymore.

KNIGHTLEY: I've noticed that the people who started on film still have the ability to see the person in front of them. Whereas for a lot of photographers who have only ever worked in digital, the relationship between the photographer and the person who they're taking a picture of sort of doesn't exist anymore. They're looking at a computer screen as opposed to the person.



I've noticed at gigs that more and more people spend the whole set looking at it on their phone screen too.

Snapper 15 4.5k 3 United States Outlying Islands
11 Nov 2014 10:01AM
I've noticed on a couple of tv programmes with Rankin that he spends loads of time checking the computer screen rather than engaging with the sitter. Mind you, he also seems to get a bit tactile with many of his subjects, so he isn't really ignoring them! Wink
themak 7 1.0k Scotland
11 Nov 2014 10:07AM
I suppose celebs are frequently confronted by people with iPads where their heads should be - I guess that would be alienating. Don't see that 'digital' has anything to do with it - there have always been cameras between the subject and the photographer since day one - it's up to the man holding the camera to communicate.
SteveCharles 17 2.3k 18 England
11 Nov 2014 10:09AM
you could have warned us the link open that picture of Keira!

I agree/understand, and I've read others say much the same thing. I remember Zed Nelson in article in BJP saying that he feels he does his best work on film, because of the connection and involvement with the subject.

11 Nov 2014 10:38AM
I know the feeling. Having returned to full manual B&W shooting with a rangefinder last year I rediscovered wonderful world of "simple" photography. You use an exposure meter ( analogous) to find the exposure, dial it in once a shoot, then correct occasionally according to the subject lighting. Except that - only shutter wind-up lever,lens focusing ring and shutter button.

Much tighter contact with the subject, more time to think composition, more pure creativity with minimalistic camera options. Loved every moment of it!

Still, shoot mainstream with digital. One cannot discount progress and chances it gives, and temptation to use fast AF, in-camera precise automatic light metering, etc. takes the best of us.

Should I say now that I don't like guides, levels, histograms, etc. in EVF or on camera screen when taking images? That should have been obvious by now. With that, I don't care how complex a technology stands between my eye and the subject - the photography about my vision, not technology.

If one does not see or care - camera won't do it for them, rather will distract. Pity people do not start learning photography with film cameras these days. And "beginner" digital cameras do poor service in this regard making a newbie to think of "camera magic" more than magic of their own creativity.
themak 7 1.0k Scotland
11 Nov 2014 12:13PM
Interesting that Keira admits to being a 'horrific romantic about film', whereas the photographer is much more pragmatic.
Paul Morgan 19 19.5k 6 England
11 Nov 2014 5:20PM

Quote:I've noticed on a couple of tv programmes with Rankin that he spends loads of time checking the computer screen rather than engaging with the sitter. Mind you, he also seems to get a bit tactile with many of his subjects, so he isn't really ignoring them!


That`s because its a TV program and he`s sharing the results with the viewer.

Recently I was watching a Peter Hurley YouTube video and he talked about the avoidance of constant chimping in a professional environment.
ade_mcfade 16 15.2k 216 England
11 Nov 2014 5:41PM
I have to constantly tell my trainees to stop looking at the screen after every fekin shot... just kills a portrait shot, no raport... may as well pack up and go home!

SteveCharles 17 2.3k 18 England
11 Nov 2014 7:49PM
Here's another great, Mary Ellen Mark, touching on the same subject in a short video - telling students to turn the back of the camera off. Just came up in my twitter feed, by coincidence.

Link
11 Nov 2014 7:49PM
My best studio session images are a record of a really great conversation. I mostly look over the top of the camera. Old habits Wink

Sadly, all to often, youngsters have little or no ability to talk to people other than those of their own age group. When you do get a person who can freely converse, work becomes a pleasure.
redsnappa 18 2.0k United Kingdom
11 Nov 2014 10:33PM
Since when did we photographers take advice from celebrities.

During my photo shoots I always show my models the images that have been taken on the cameras rear screen (I believe you guys call it chumping, chimping or chomping whatever.) myself and the model will along with the standard conversation will discuss the images poses etc and post process options.

One thing I do 100% believe is that those photographers who see the cameras rear LCD display a obstacle to creating good images, they are almost certainly using it incorrectly eg checking the geeky stuff in photography like exposure, colour balance or histograms.
11 Nov 2014 11:40PM

Quote:Since when did we photographers take advice from celebrities.

...


Or are interviewed by them? And since when we discuss with our models post-process options. We are not really intersted to know their opinion on how much of s-shape the curves must be. Wink
Paul Morgan 19 19.5k 6 England
12 Nov 2014 2:01AM
Since when did we photographers take advice from celebrities.

Several film actors have become well known for photography Smile

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