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Free Speech


capto Plus
7 6.1k 15 United Kingdom
18 Feb 2020 6:16PM
Has 'Free Speech' become a victim of political correctness?

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DaveRyder Plus
6 3.9k 2 United Kingdom
18 Feb 2020 6:26PM
I remember my early days at work and the language we used amongst ourselves that was taken with no offence or malice in either direction when given and taken.

I find people so easily take offence today and vocal minorities can set overall tones of dialogue ans sensibilities.
Try looking at some 70s' and 80s' comedy shows that would never be made today.

So yes, I believe it has. Based on our lacking ability to take insults in our stride.



hobbo Plus
9 1.4k 3 England
18 Feb 2020 8:05PM
Anyone who was a kid during WWII ..... did National Service......Worked on building sites..... can take any verbal rubbish thrown at us.....

Just a load of wimps nowadays......

Oooooer .....should I use the word...... Wimps ?

See what I mean?
JackAllTog Plus
11 5.9k 58 United Kingdom
18 Feb 2020 9:59PM
Free Speech has always been controlled in some way by peers. family, colleagues, religion, and now with looser close links and more social apps, news & TV its being controlled by a wider audience.

When free speech propagates hate i'd control it. When PC controls free thinking i'd challenge it.
altitude50 15 17.6k United Kingdom
18 Feb 2020 10:05PM
Are we allowed to talk about free speech!? Blush
saltireblue Plus
9 10.4k 59 Norway
19 Feb 2020 7:42AM

Quote:Are we allowed to talk about free speech!? Blush

According to Article 10 of the Human Rights Act: (Freedom of expression), yes.
According to millions of online snowflakes whose right it is to be offended, then no.
Big Bri 18 16.6k United Kingdom
19 Feb 2020 9:26AM
The problem is, we have laws about "hate crimes" yet no clear definition of what constitutes one, so whether something is deemed offensive is entirely left to the person on the receiving end, which is plainly ridiculous.
It is the intent of the person speaking that matters, not whether or not someone finds it offensive.

It's also ridiculous to pick people up on what they call certain sections of our community, unless they are obviously being deliberately insulting. If you say someone is black, you get told "you can't say that now, you have to say coloured" then "you can't say coloured, you have to say people of colour". I don't know when the memo got sent out that I obviously missed, but if I talk about someone being black or coloured, I am not doing it to be offensive, and it's not my fault if I missed the latest PC term.

It's almost like the word "black" is being erased from the language. Because some people find it offensive to describe people as black, we can't describe other things as black. Things which are, in fact, black.
21 Feb 2020 9:10AM
I don't take offence if someone calls me "White," though I've met a few people for whom the term "Colourless Person" might be more appropriate.
SteveAitch 2 25 United Kingdom
21 Feb 2020 9:25AM
You could use the police IC codes - demand they refer to you as IC1. Wink
21 Feb 2020 10:59AM

Quote:You could use the police IC codes - demand they refer to you as IC1. Wink

Not a bad idea, but I'm quite comfortable with "White," which is of course, as we photographers know, all the colours combined.
thewilliam2 3 1.4k
21 Feb 2020 11:23AM
A few decades ago, when I had a teaching job under the old (leftie) County of Avon, we were given a 4 page list of words and phrases that we were forbidden to use, together with the acceptable replacements.

Blackboard was out and it had to be called a chalkboard. Manhole covers became access covers but I don't recall any mention of the offensive racial descriptions like the "N word".
21 Feb 2020 12:05PM
With all these terminological pitfalls I sometimes think it's a miracle we manage to get through a day without offending someone somewhere. Sorry, I should have said, "person-age to get through a day." Blush
saltireblue Plus
9 10.4k 59 Norway
21 Feb 2020 1:15PM
When it comes to the right to speak freely, too many people forget a very wise piece of advice, attributed to Evelyn Beatrice Hall in 1906, and still equally relevant today - in fact, probably more relevant today than when it was first said:

"I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it."

Too many people today are not willing to accept that there is such a right...
altitude50 15 17.6k United Kingdom
21 Feb 2020 1:31PM
I read somewhere that the origin of the word manhole came from the same root as the word manipulate, so is nothing to do with gender. I cannot find the reference now.Sad

saltireblue Plus
9 10.4k 59 Norway
21 Feb 2020 1:49PM

Quote:I read somewhere that the origin of the word manhole came from the same root as the word manipulate, so is nothing to do with gender. I cannot find the reference now.Sad



Manipulate - form the noun 'manipulation', has its origins from early 18th century French, from Latin manipulus ‘handful’.

The term manhole comes from the 19th century and originally referred to a small access hole in the top or side of a boiler that was covered with a heavy metal plate bolted in place. These holes were not meant to provide access for a man to pass through, but for an arm and hand to reach the inner parts of the boiler. “Man” in this case refers not to the gender of the worker, but is from the root word that means “hand,” as in the word “manual.” Indeed, some old boiler manuals use the words “manhole” and “handhole” synonymously.

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