Nik Collection 2018 by DxO - FREE with selected X-Rite products!

Full Frame High ISO Camera For Pro Wrestling


2 Aug 2017 10:55AM
In reply to LenShepherd

In any form of movement shooting a faster frame rate is likely to be better than a slower one

I did primarily suggest better equipped DX bodies and mentioned the D750 full frame as the OP was concerned with very high ISO requirements and full frame had been mentioned by a friend

My comment on primes being faster than the zooms was in relation to light only, the f2.8 zooms are well outside budget and quite slow in f stop terms compared to the primes available

As for the OP level of experience, I did give what I thought was some helpful advice on camera settings how I would shoot in such situations, rather than suggesting that the OP " is not going to be good at wrestling Photography"

Perhaps you could also try to give some helpful advice on this also

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

Chris_L 5 5.0k United Kingdom
2 Aug 2017 11:00AM

Quote:As ever in these discussions, advocates lose sight

Not just of the budget (though I remember suggesting a used A7S for that reason) but of what the guy asks.

In a thread entitled "Full Frame High ISO Camera For Pro Wrestling". Mikehit suggested a non full-frame camera whose standard ISO tops out a measly 16000. Why??

Overlooked, so far I think, is the original poster's desire to shoot his subjects leaving the background black. That's going to depend a hell of a lot on how the venue is lit and whether he is allowed to use a flash.


mikehit 9 8.0k 13 United Kingdom
2 Aug 2017 11:13AM

Quote:
In a thread entitled "Full Frame High ISO Camera For Pro Wrestling". Mikehit suggested a non full-frame camera whose standard ISO tops out a measly 16000. Why??



This is where you need knowledge of the sport. From everything I have seen on similar sports photos (and shooting in dimly lit areas myself) ISO 16,000 may well not be needed. Why go for a model that does things you don't need?
The 6D and 5D3 top out at 25,600 both expandable


Quote:
Overlooked, so far I think, is the original poster's desire to shoot his subjects leaving the background black. That's going to depend a hell of a lot on how the venue is lit and whether he is allowed to use a flash.


If he wants the background black, why restrict yourself to a camera that has massive DR and allows you to do the crazy shadow boost that have been posted as examples? That is what I would call losing sight of the aims.

I repeat: I am not saying the Sonys you recommended will not do the job. I am saying choose the right camera for the right reasons and don't restrict choice based on functions that will not matter to you as a photographer. IME most cameras nowadays will give you great shots in all but the most extreme circumstances and in fast moving situations the way a camera handles can make the difference between getting the shot or not, and things like DR are low down the list.
LenShepherd 11 3.9k United Kingdom
2 Aug 2017 11:29AM

Quote:
rather than suggesting that the OP " is not going to be good at wrestling Photography"

Perhaps you could also try to give some helpful advice on this also



If you had read what I said before writing you might not have quoted out of context and might have commented otherwise.

What I said was if the OP cannot get good wrestling shots with generally good to very good equipment like a D500 and 35DX or 50mm prime (roughly within budget after part exchange and much more suitable equipment than current) then he/she is not going to be good at wrestling photography.
There is more to good photography than owning good equipment.
Chris_L 5 5.0k United Kingdom
2 Aug 2017 11:49AM
mikehit, I'm talking about your suggestion for an 80D. I only took notice of the leaving the background black on re-reading the post. Didn't see anyone else pick up on it.

Anyway poster seems convinced he needs full frame with high ISO and I don't think he will be satisfied until he has that, knowing that duff shots are his fault and not the camera.

I shot Canon for years including the Canon 5D II. Convinced by you and others to give mirrorless a shot I went through two Panasonic MFTs, GX7 and GH4. Loved them to bits but noisy as hell compared to what I'd used previously.

I sold everything and went to Sony simply because I was now convinced by modern EVF and mirrorless and I've always wanted to shoot in dimly lit situations using available light. I'd seen the candlelit dinner parties photographed on those Sony cameras.

The A7S and A7S II have the same sensor, take away internal 4k and IBIS and they are the same camera. I've had an A7S II for over a year and I can say, from personal experience, that you never worry about your ISO. I remember shooting an opening ceremony at a local event, it was in October, it was dark, there was some lighting but wasn't up to much, the two togs next to me were shooting with flash. I didn't have to.

Yes my shots were only 12mp. But they were clean and totally usable on the internet. Something you mentioned.

Second hand A7S, full frame, high ISO, well within budget.

Sony sensors in general, fab high ISO performance, shooting in the street with light from shop windows, liberating

250184_1501670671.jpg



Check some of the other people's photos of Balloons in Durham, loads of others taken at the same scene as mine below. Poor detail, dim etc. Not so with Sony:





mikehit 9 8.0k 13 United Kingdom
2 Aug 2017 1:47PM

Quote:mikehit, I'm talking about your suggestion for an 80D. I only took notice of the leaving the background black on re-reading the post. Didn't see anyone else pick up on it.

Anyway poster seems convinced he needs full frame with high ISO and I don't think he will be satisfied until he has that, knowing that duff shots are his fault and not the camera.



I mentioned the 80D only to say that there is a viable camera at a lower price than a FF camera - I bet the person offering his FF advice has never used one! Also I think at this level getting a quality fast focussing f2.8 lens will potentially have much bigger impact than the difference between 60D/6D/A7x. That and giving serious consideration to how the images will be presented.
Those pictures of your certainly show the capability of the A7 series.

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.