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Has anyone tried using this...........


SnappyPete 13 8 United Kingdom
3 Jul 2010 9:43PM
I am in the market for a 10 stop ND Filter, and as yet undecided on the LEE Big Stopper, or the B+W Screw in version.

But, I have read online people using welding glass (Available on ebay for approx 2.00) and with slight mods will fit a cokin filter holder.

Has anyone ever tried using this method? Any views ? I know there maybe a green tint but is there a quality issue?
rhody 19 2.8k 2 United Kingdom
3 Jul 2010 9:56PM
Late 11 9
3 Jul 2010 10:37PM
Welding glass works, if not as well as the real thing. You can get them for a couple of quid off ebay, or 3.50 from Machine Mart. They come in various strengths numbered something like 9-14. Mine is marked 11 and is about 14.5 stops. They are all very green so you must do a custom white balance, or correct in post processing.

They are a faff to use though. Most people get something like a Cokin adapter and glue it to that. Blu-Tack works okay. Make sure it is sealed all the way round or you'll get light leaks. Seal the edges too. By the same token, cover the viewfinder during exposure as light gets in there and creeps around the mirror causing fogging and streaking.

The Lee Big Stopper is good for square filter users. It is almost neutral (a smidge blue) and has a neat foam gasket that seals it from light leaks against the filter holder.

I'm not over-impressed by the B+W ten stops jobbie, as it's a bit orange and not coated, which it should be for the price (neither is the Lee, come to that).

I think the best ND filter is the Light Craft Workshops ND500 which is nine stops. It is also very slightly blue like the Lee, but is multi-coated and much cheaper. 77mm screw fit only, 58 from Premier Ink here http://www.premier-ink.co.uk/photographic/threaded-filters/neutral-density/light-craft-workshop-77mm-nd500mc-filter-p-2927.html

Hoya make a nine-ish stops X400 but it's pricey and special order only.
SnappyPete 13 8 United Kingdom
3 Jul 2010 10:59PM
Wow! Thanks for all that info "Late" Especially the link for the alternative filter. I have never heard of them, and at that price has got to be worth a look. Thanks again.
sherlob Plus
15 3.2k 131 United Kingdom
4 Jul 2010 12:12AM
Lee Big Stoppers can proove hard to get hold of - indeed when I spoke to Warehouse Express a couple of weeks ago about the 3month delay on my order I was advised the current waiting list is nearer 12 months! Still I now have mine and the quality of the results is excellent - the colour cast is 'as reported' a tad cool, but hats off to their optical engineers 'cause compared to any other on the market its an impressive bit of glass. Order one, but whilst your waiting experiment with your welding glass...

Adam

Edit: BTW personally I found in experimenting with the screw in versions that they prooved hard to use. You still need to apply ND grads for even exposures in landscapes, and once the filter is in place you can't easily adjust these; further if your lens barrel protrudes for zoom or focus you risk changing the settings. The square filters allow you to set up the exposure, the focus, and even take a test shot before simply slotting in the filter, switching to bulb, calculating the shutter speed and away...
BigRick 16 2.1k 3 United Kingdom
4 Jul 2010 9:45AM

Quote:Welding glass works, if not as well as the real thing. You can get them for a couple of quid off ebay, or 3.50 from Machine Mart. They come in various strengths numbered something like 9-14. Mine is marked 11 and is about 14.5 stops. They are all very green so you must do a custom white balance, or correct in post processing.

They are a faff to use though. Most people get something like a Cokin adapter and glue it to that. Blu-Tack works okay. Make sure it is sealed all the way round or you'll get light leaks. Seal the edges too. By the same token, cover the viewfinder during exposure as light gets in there and creeps around the mirror causing fogging and streaking.

The Lee Big Stopper is good for square filter users. It is almost neutral (a smidge blue) and has a neat foam gasket that seals it from light leaks against the filter holder.

I'm not over-impressed by the B+W ten stops jobbie, as it's a bit orange and not coated, which it should be for the price (neither is the Lee, come to that).

I think the best ND filter is the Light Craft Workshops ND500 which is nine stops. It is also very slightly blue like the Lee, but is multi-coated and much cheaper. 77mm screw fit only, 58 from Premier Ink here http://www.premier-ink.co.uk/photographic/threaded-filters/neutral-density/light-craft-workshop-77mm-nd500mc-filter-p-2927.html

Hoya make a nine-ish stops X400 but it's pricey and special order only.



You can get shades from 3 to 14.... 3 being the lightest. Smile
dcash29 16 2.4k England
4 Jul 2010 10:03AM

Quote:They are a faff to use though. Most people get something like a Cokin adapter and glue it to that. Blu-Tack works okay. Make sure it is sealed all the way round or you'll get light leaks. Seal the edges too. By the same token, cover the viewfinder during exposure as light gets in there and creeps around the mirror causing fogging and streaking.


They fit snugly into the Cokin P holder. Although the edges require rounding
sut68 18 2.0k 77 England
4 Jul 2010 10:11AM
By all means use welding glass if all you wish to do is convert to mono, but you'll find it very hard to beat the BIG Stopper for it's useability [being a slide in filter] and it's colour fidelity. Yes it may be a touch blue but a quick WB adjustment sorts that.

Screw in filters [such as the B+W ones] are fine, until you come to use them in the real world and then the fact that it's a nightmare to attach grads accurately when you're taking them off and putting them back on again. Several minutes is a long time to wait to see if you got it right or not Grin

I originally bought a HiTech 10 stop and that was/is awful. The handling of the IR wasn't consistent across the shot and a WB adjustment introduced some strange colour schemes. Absolutely no complaints in buying my Lee one at all, there are also a few on here that have bought elsewhere and not had the wait of WE.

Maybe you could use welding glass waiting for your BIG Stopper to arrive Wink

Paul
michaelcombe 12 46 2 United Kingdom
4 Jul 2010 12:59PM
I agree whole haeartedly with Paul's comments, the Lee Big Stopper is worth hanging on for.

I tend to prefer shooting late morning with mine as I don't always have the patience for several minutes of long exposures! I've just uploaded a shot from Friday to my gallery taken using the Big Stopper. It's very easy to use and I certainly don;t leave home without it!

Michael

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