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Has anyone used The Simon King Ultimate Wildlife Hide?


StrayCat 16 19.1k 3 Canada
22 May 2017 7:19PM
Where we go to photograph wildlife, if we were caught putting food out, we'd gat a hefty fine. There are signs everywhere warning people not to do it, because the animals become accustomed to it and then lose their fear of people and become a threat. I don't know much about foxes, but I know they had to move one from a picnic area near where we go last summer, it became completely tame, that's not a situation you want in the wilderness, If I were you, I would study the habits of the wildlife you want to photograph and set up your blind in a safe place and catch them going about their daily lives. Your best tool is knowledge.

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Philh04 Plus
14 2.2k United Kingdom
22 May 2017 7:59PM

Quote:Where we go to photograph wildlife, if we were caught putting food out, we'd gat a hefty fine. There are signs everywhere warning people not to do it, because the animals become accustomed to it and then lose their fear of people and become a threat. I don't know much about foxes, but I know they had to move one from a picnic area near where we go last summer, it became completely tame, that's not a situation you want in the wilderness, If I were you, I would study the habits of the wildlife you want to photograph and set up your blind in a safe place and catch them going about their daily lives. Your best tool is knowledge.


Yes I agree, if food is being put out on a regular basis as can happen at 'hotspots' it is not advisable. This I assume is a site not visited by a number of people and the use of a few (I emphasise a few) peanuts on the odd occasion to get the animal more used to the hide will not be a problem, yes you do have to be careful and not get the animal habituated therefor you should stay hidden in the hide and the animal should not see you place the treats and you should wear gloves to hide your scent.

You say signs are all over the place that suggests it is an area visited by many people and I would fully agree that feeding or even the odd treat would not be acceptable in that situation, particularly if the wildlife is dangerous.
LenShepherd 12 4.2k United Kingdom
22 May 2017 8:59PM
It part depends on what sort of photography you have in mind.
I use a chair type hide as I am usually at one site for at least two hours.
Wildlife can take 15 minutes or more to accept a new hide.
Chair hides are relatively heavy because of the chair, but comfortable with space for a tripod forward of the chair, a camera bag, mine has a cup holder for a drink, and they have side as well as the front vent for a big lens.
Paul Morgan 19 19.5k 6 England
22 May 2017 9:10PM

Quote:Thank you to everyone for your responses. I will try out the chair hide and consider the larger Simon King hide for future.

My research into hides has been prompted by a recent sighting and photographing of a Red Fox. I have returned to the same spot in the hope of seeing and photographing it again, which I have managed to do so on both occasions. The second time around it saw me, stopped and ran off in the opposite direction. A green hat and camo snood doesn't really cut it! Also from the area I have been positioned there are fences, so i have to have my tripod fully extended, which doesn't help with concealment.

The area is marshy and for the most part very open, with limited options for concealment. Once the fence is crossed, there is a burn, then you are onto farmland, I will be going to consider the best place to put the hide.

It will be interesting to try out a portable hide for the first time.

Thank you all.

Steven




I hide alone is not always enough, badgers, foxes etc can also smell you, but visit them often and once they realise that your no threat they could get quite close.

I use to go out and sit with badgers, no hide needed, got a scare one day when a badger jumped on my lap and went eyeball to eyeball with me from about four inches Smile
23 May 2017 12:11AM
Thank you very much for your help. I see another reason for avoiding chicken.


Quote:I would avoid chicken just in case it gives them the taste, particularly if there are chicken keepers in your area, they do like peanuts and you don't have to put that many down so a small bag will last for a while.

As for your question, several ways to achieve your aim, if the deer was stationary (highly unlikely) then combine two exposures, if light is good and you are able to, a circular polariser will darken the sky, finally simply enhancing the sky in post, with care a good result can be achieved. In all cases I would prefer the deer to be correctly exposed. However, if the sky is interesting and the form of the animal is clear, then a silhouette against that interesting sky would be my choice.

HTH

23 May 2017 12:17AM
One hide will be a great start. They may already be familiar with my scent, as I visit the area I will use the bag hide quite regularly. I bumped into a group of Badgers last year, who quickly ran off. It was a memorable experience, but none of them were that familiar. Did you get to that stage over a long period?


Quote:
Quote:Thank you to everyone for your responses. I will try out the chair hide and consider the larger Simon King hide for future.

My research into hides has been prompted by a recent sighting and photographing of a Red Fox. I have returned to the same spot in the hope of seeing and photographing it again, which I have managed to do so on both occasions. The second time around it saw me, stopped and ran off in the opposite direction. A green hat and camo snood doesn't really cut it! Also from the area I have been positioned there are fences, so i have to have my tripod fully extended, which doesn't help with concealment.

The area is marshy and for the most part very open, with limited options for concealment. Once the fence is crossed, there is a burn, then you are onto farmland, I will be going to consider the best place to put the hide.

It will be interesting to try out a portable hide for the first time.

Thank you all.

Steven




I hide alone is not always enough, badgers, foxes etc can also smell you, but visit them often and once they realise that your no threat they could get quite close.

I use to go out and sit with badgers, no hide needed, got a scare one day when a badger jumped on my lap and went eyeball to eyeball with me from about four inches Smile

Paul Morgan 19 19.5k 6 England
23 May 2017 9:51AM

Quote:One hide will be a great start. They may already be familiar with my scent, as I visit the area I will use the bag hide quite regularly. I bumped into a group of Badgers last year, who quickly ran off. It was a memorable experience, but none of them were that familiar. Did you get to that stage over a long period?


It took a few weeks, I spent many hours with them but I was not doing it for photographs although I did take a few, it got to the point were they were stuck to me like flea`s, I found them extremely playful and each had there own character, lovely things.
23 May 2017 1:14PM
I wonder if they started to see you as a Badger. I would absolutely love that and it would be a special experience.


Quote:
Quote:One hide will be a great start. They may already be familiar with my scent, as I visit the area I will use the bag hide quite regularly. I bumped into a group of Badgers last year, who quickly ran off. It was a memorable experience, but none of them were that familiar. Did you get to that stage over a long period?


It took a few weeks, I spent many hours with them but I was not doing it for photographs although I did take a few, it got to the point were they were stuck to me like flea`s, I found them extremely playful and each had there own character, lovely things.

23 May 2017 1:17PM
I am awaiting delivery of the hide, as it has been despatched. I hope there is adequate space for tripod use? I am looking forward to trying it out.


Quote:I bought a chair hide several years back, which was quite cheap. It worked really well and remained intact through a lot of use for 2-3 yrs.
I now use it in my darkroom for transferring films into developing tanks, which also works well.
Only cost 60 or there abouts.
Like this:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Camo-Pop-Up-Chair-Hide-Quick-Erect-Decoying-Shooting-Photography-Tent-Waterproof-/192192614631

23 May 2017 1:22PM
I am considering setting up the chair hide in a good spot and leaving it. I rarely see anyone, other than Farmers and dog walkers, so it should stay where I leave it! I remember Chris Packham talking about going to a spot where had a hide permanently in place, just to confronted with an empty space!


Quote:It part depends on what sort of photography you have in mind.
I use a chair type hide as I am usually at one site for at least two hours.
Wildlife can take 15 minutes or more to accept a new hide.
Chair hides are relatively heavy because of the chair, but comfortable with space for a tripod forward of the chair, a camera bag, mine has a cup holder for a drink, and they have side as well as the front vent for a big lens.

Philh04 Plus
14 2.2k United Kingdom
23 May 2017 3:57PM

Quote:I am considering setting up the chair hide in a good spot and leaving it. I rarely see anyone, other than Farmers and dog walkers, so it should stay where I leave it! I remember Chris Packham talking about going to a spot where had a hide permanently in place, just to confronted with an empty space!


It does happen sadly, try to choose somewhere where there is some natural cover too, this will help to conceal your hide that little bit better, also make sure you peg it down well, a good gust of wind can take them for quite a journey, I watched one of mine travel to the other side of a field. Yes there is room for a tripod, one leg to the front and two to the side to give room for your legs and bags, if needed the front facing leg can poke out the front of the hide.
23 May 2017 4:57PM
Cover blown! Blush I will bare that in mind when setting the hide up. I will be able to use vegetation once it has grown some more. I will investigate my available options.


Quote:
Quote:I am considering setting up the chair hide in a good spot and leaving it. I rarely see anyone, other than Farmers and dog walkers, so it should stay where I leave it! I remember Chris Packham talking about going to a spot where had a hide permanently in place, just to confronted with an empty space!


It does happen sadly, try to choose somewhere where there is some natural cover too, this will help to conceal your hide that little bit better, also make sure you peg it down well, a good gust of wind can take them for quite a journey, I watched one of mine travel to the other side of a field. Yes there is room for a tripod, one leg to the front and two to the side to give room for your legs and bags, if needed the front facing leg can poke out the front of the hide.

25 May 2017 7:15PM

Quote:I bought a chair hide several years back, which was quite cheap. It worked really well and remained intact through a lot of use for 2-3 yrs.
I now use it in my darkroom for transferring films into developing tanks, which also works well.
Only cost 60 or there abouts.
Like this:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Camo-Pop-Up-Chair-Hide-Quick-Erect-Decoying-Shooting-Photography-Tent-Waterproof-/192192614631



I received the chair hide today and I set it up indoors to try it out. It's very easy to set up, with plenty of space inside for my camera mounted on a tripod, my camera bag, with ample room to move around, so I am not cramped. Collapsing the hide and putting back into the carry bag is quick and easy. I would say it has been made to a high standard and will be very useful, whenever I can put it full use. I have only ever used fixed hides, so it will be interesting to see how it goes.

From first impressions, I think a few revisions would be good. I'd like to see camo mesh around all of the windows, but not the zip entrance. Even camo mesh just around the two front windows would be welcomed. I may get a camo net to put over the top to cover the side windows, so I can look out without being spotted! With my lense through the semi-circular windows, I can only zip it closed about halfway. I have a small piece of camo mesh that I can use to fill the open area around my lense. I wondered if a vent on the top could be useful to stop it getting too hot inside, which can be zipped closed, such as if it's raining!

Thank you for the link and recommendation. The same goes to all who gave me their input.
arhb 13 3.4k 68 United Kingdom
25 May 2017 10:06PM
Glad it arrived ok.
Re revisions and customization, this place has some good stock of Wildlife Watching Supplies
30 May 2017 10:14PM
I got the new hide set up yesterday. It was very welcome, as it started raining quite heavily and continued for several hours! I sat in the hide while the rain continued. I didn't see much, but a few Pheasants, a Grey Heron and cattle.

It was a pain to lug it about to where I set it up, as I was also carrying a camera bag, tripod, with DSLR and 300mm telephoto. I decided to leave it where I set it up! I didn't much like the idea of collapsing and carrying the muckle thing home after Sunset. I hope it is still where I left it!

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