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Help please!! 2nd shooter advice!


MCordner 6 5
26 Jun 2014 12:08AM
I am sorry if similar has been covered before but I have joined this group because I am in need of some advice please!

I have been asked to be a 2nd shooter for a wedding next month by a photographer near my home town but I need to invest in a new lens! I currently only have the 35mm 1.8 which is permanently stuck to my camera and the 18-105mm kit lens that came with my d7000. I know this sounds awful for someone looking to get into this professionally but I don't have a massive budget to get a new lens so am looking around the 400 ($700) mark.
I was all set to buy the 85mm 1.8 next as the majority of photographs I take at the moment are portraits and while my 35mm on the DX is more like 56ish I think so its perfect for indoors but I need more zoom for outdoor shots. Now I have been asked to be a 2nd shooter though I am completely torn. The main shooter wants me to capture lots of candid photographs and therefore I think I may be better leaning toward a Tamron 70-200 2.8 which I may just be able to afford.
My points are:

85mm
Pros.... Great reviews of crisp photos, light weight, good bokeh, f1.8!
Cons.... too short for candid, may restrict me for things like church where I may not be free too move around.

70-200mm
Pros...Flexibility, ability to shoot people from further away, 2.8 should still be wide enough to get good shots in a dark(ish) church
Cons... So so heavy, very large -will scare anyone away in normal life so I don't think I'll be taking this out with me for casual family shots or holidays!


Any feedback is appreciated! I really want to get this ordered so I can get practising with it!! In an ideal world for a 2nd shooter I'd have a 24-70mm 70-200mm and primes of 35mm, 85mm but this is me working towards that goal!!

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26 Jun 2014 8:42AM
How much you gonna make as a "second shooter"? I am afraid not enough to justify spendings for new lens. Ask your "employer" to borrow lens from them. They will be selling your work.under their name I understand.
keithh 16 25.6k 33 Wallis And Futuna
26 Jun 2014 12:29PM
If you're second shooting a wedding and really have to spend your money albeit in the knowledge that you're getting a lens to go forward with, then buy the 70-200, bolt it on and never take it off all day.
Jenks199 14 10 United Kingdom
26 Jun 2014 2:03PM
There's always the short term option of hiring a lens if needs be. If you choose to go down this route I'd be happy to recommend the one I use quite often. Just PM me.
lemmy 13 2.8k United Kingdom
26 Jun 2014 3:21PM
When I think of the years of training I went through to learn my craft - now all you have to do is buy a camera and lens and do it Sad

Good in some ways, I suppose in that anyone can have a go but the wedding photographers I knew were highly experienced guys who had done apprenticeships and training before they charged people to do something as important to a couple as their wedding - the kind of people you went to for advice - not the kind who asked it.

I'm definitely out of my time!
MCordner 6 5
26 Jun 2014 4:03PM
Thank you all for your comments.

Lemmy not that I should have to justify myself to you but I will because you have upset me with your patronising comment. I have done two photography courses, 3 christenings endless amount of birthday parties and portraits and won competitions for my photography all using my kit lens and 35mm 1.8 which I am very proud of! This is the first time I have been offered payment for my work and I want to get advice from other photographers with more experience in the wedding field about the best possible lens to help me acheive the best possible results. I am not the main shooter and will be assisting as well as taking candid shots and learning on the job.

If you do not intend to give helpful feedback why comment?
Paul Morgan 19 19.4k 6 England
26 Jun 2014 4:39PM

Quote:Thank you all for your comments.

Lemmy not that I should have to justify myself to you but I will because you have upset me with your patronising comment. I have done two photography courses, 3 christenings endless amount of birthday parties and portraits and won competitions for my photography all using my kit lens and 35mm 1.8 which I am very proud of! This is the first time I have been offered payment for my work and I want to get advice from other photographers with more experience in the wedding field about the best possible lens to help me acheive the best possible results. I am not the main shooter and will be assisting as well as taking candid shots and learning on the job.

If you do not intend to give helpful feedback why comment?



Back in Lemmy`s day you could walk in off the street and ask for a job and they will train you up, not anymore.

Do what you have to do and don`t let anyone worry you.
MCordner 6 5
26 Jun 2014 7:11PM
Thanks Paul! That's a good bit of advice there!

I have decided to buy an 85mm 1.8 (on its way!!) as I know that's the lens I'm gonna use a lot and rent the 70-200mm 2.8 nikon either newer vr 11 for 34 or older one is 24 so bargain I think, then I can see how I get on with the weight!!

Thanks everyone for your comments!! Renting is something I'd thought would be more expensive but really impressed with those prices. It's only for 1 day but they drop it off lunchtime the day before an pick it up the day after! For 20 what's to lose! (Other than all feeling in my arms probably!)
MrGoatsmilk 12 1.5k England
26 Jun 2014 8:13PM
I have second shot loads of times for a local wedding photographer who has since become a close friend. On starting I used an 18-50 2.8 and 70-200 2.8 both sigma, also kept a 50 1.8 in the bag. Those are good lenses to have with you (not so much the 50mm I find). I have over time added more kit including a 17-40 useful for taking shots of the location, along with off camera flashes and triggers 3 bodies etc etc ( all comes with time and paid weddings I took on myself.)

However as long as you have something in the ranges of 18-50 and the 70-200 particularly 2.8's you should be fine, it gets challenging when the light levels are low but a combination of aperture and a camera with low noise really helps.

Whatever you do don't be put off by comments made by Lemmy and the like as I did, these types of comments put me off for a while, however it turns out by getting in and second shooting I not only learned the limitations of my kit but also how the day runs and what does and can go wrong, I also learned that the dinosaurs don't know it all like they keep telling everyone, no one possibly can know it all. Since which I have had happy customers and keep getting asked to shoot weddings which sadly I'm turning down at the moment due to work and family commitments, this WILL change.

Enjoy it and good luck, oh and backup up everything to more than one drive as you never know when you may need the files again.

Stu
MCordner 6 5
26 Jun 2014 9:45PM
Great tip with the back up Stu! Am hoping I don't regret not buying the 70-200 2.8 but I was a bit more money and with it being quite a monster I don't think I'll be using it unless I get this opportunity again! So hopefully the rental will do me for now! Thanks xx
peterjones 18 5.0k 1 United Kingdom
27 Jun 2014 5:55PM
If I wanted to shoot lots of candids and all I had was a 35mm & 85mm I wouldn't feel disadvantaged in the slightest though I would also prefer to have a 20mm in the bag as well.

Do ignore all us wingeing "pros" .... too many wedding photographers, things weren't as they used to be, bla, bla, bla.

G'luck, Peter.
MCordner 6 5
27 Jun 2014 9:16PM
Great thanks peter! Glad to hear that! Don't want to rent and take too much but want to be prepared too! Might take my 18-105 aswell then incase I need something at the lower or upper end, and just as a back up, not great in low light but would be fine once we're out of the church!
peterjones 18 5.0k 1 United Kingdom
27 Jun 2014 9:53PM
I agee that not only your 18-105 is a good back up just in case but also it ain't a bad lens in it's own right; some time ago I took some pictures as a guest at a wedding and was pleasantly surprised at the quality of images I took with the 18-105.

Peter.
thewilliam 11 6.1k
27 Jun 2014 11:44PM
In the good 'ol days, we had to shoot weddings with kit far more primitive than we have today.

We just learned how to get the best from our kit because failure was never an option. As Peter said, your present kit is more than up to the job.

A few months back, I was at a seminar given by an expert photographer who shoots most pix using a kit lens. He accepts that they don't last long but they're so cheap that he can afford to replace them!
Paul_Anthony 8 442 4 Wales
28 Jun 2014 8:35AM
Agree with the majority above. Your doing the right thing gaining work and experience as a second shooter, the knowledge you will pick up of how a day runs and how to manage all the people at a wedding will be invaluable.

Yes, you need adequate kit for the job in hand, but watching an experienced wedding photographer work with large numbers of people will stand you in good stead.

I didn't have any experience when I started out, just a passion for photography, so I asked photographers if I could spend some time with them as a second shooter, for free, to gain experience. I learnt loads about kit and lots of people skills.

Good luck...

Paul

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