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Help with DSLR Settings


thefizz 17 353
15 May 2010 10:31AM
For my company, I have been shooting and scanning medium format trannsparencies of fitted kitchens for reproduction in brochues and magazines. The time required to develop and scan has prompted me to purchase a DSLR. I have little experience with digital so I'm not sure what way to set the following features of the camera (550D).

Colour Space, sRGB or RGB
White Balance
Auto Lighting Optimizer

How should I set these or do I need to worry about them at all?

The kitchens are lit with studio lights and there isn't usually much photoshop work required.
Snapper 16 4.5k 3 United States Outlying Islands
15 May 2010 11:31AM
Can't help on the specific camera, but the main thing is to shoot RAW so that you can change things like the white balance later if you want. The colourspace depands on the intended use, with sRGB being needed for web use. If it is for printing brochures, I'd wait for others to come along and advise. Smile
Jestertheclown 12 8.4k 253 England
15 May 2010 11:33AM
I'm no expert and know nothing about the environment in which you're shooting but if I was in your position, the first thing I would try would be to set the camera to "Auto" and let it do all the work for you and see what you get compared to what you've been doing.
Now, that probably won't be ideal but at least it will give you a starting point on which to base whatever adjustments you need to make.
It might be a good idea to post an image or two on here. You'll probably get some more specific advice that way.

Jester.
User_Removed 18 455 13 United Kingdom
15 May 2010 2:34PM
I would agree with shooting in RAW. It's still going to be quicker in workflow terms to process the RAW than develop and scan.

I don't know what software you use, but the DPP program that comes with Canon cameras does a good job. You can set you colour space and white balance then. I usually find he Auto White Balance is pretty good.

Not sure what Auto Lighting Optimizer is but you will have a range of controls over lighting.
thefizz 17 353
16 May 2010 8:43AM
Jester
Quote:I'm no expert and know nothing about the environment in which you're shooting but if I was in your position, the first thing I would try would be to set the camera to "Auto" and let it do all the work for you and see what you get compared to what you've been doing.
Now, that probably won't be ideal but at least it will give you a starting point on which to base whatever adjustments you need to make.
It might be a good idea to post an image or two on here. You'll probably get some more specific advice that way.



I won't be shooting in auto as my exposures will be set to suit the studio lights.

brettb
Quote:Not sure what Auto Lighting Optimizer is but you will have a range of controls over lighting.


Yes I guess I won't need the Auto Lighting Optimizer also due to setting the lights myself.
66tricky 14 742 Scotland
16 May 2010 10:44AM

Quote:.

Not sure what Auto Lighting Optimizer is but you will have a range of controls over lighting.



Having looked it up it seems to be similar to Nikon's D-lighting which tries to increases the dynamic range automatically, enabling detail in shadows.
29 May 2010 3:48PM
The Nikon D-lighting helps f.e. if you are shooting a bird against the sky; in most cases you get a dark bird on a white or grey sky, activating D-lighting the camera will process both the sky and the bird making the lighting difference not so deep. Another case would be in the woods (a lot of shadow inside) looking to the sky or another light source. I am using 95% manually settings so don't hesitate to ask something if you don't understand. I have no or less experience with studios and people portraits.
Cheers,
Gabriel

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