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Huawei Pro 20


Raith 3 3
10 Apr 2018 9:57AM
Has anyone got any views on this new revolutionary triple lens camera phone? I currently have a Nokia 1020 which is coming to the end of its life. Must confess I have almost abandoned my trusty Panasonic GH1 as generally speaking my photos to date are on a par with this traditional camera. The Pro 20 promises something even better so am seriously considering buying it. The saying that the best camera is the one you always have with you holds true with me and I am a far more active photographer as a result.
Raith 3 3
10 Apr 2018 10:06AM
It would be great if ephotozine could, purely from a camera perspective, do a comparison between the new Huawei Pro 20, the Apple X and Google Pixel 2XL phones. I have a feeling the Pro 20, with a few tweaks, could shake the whole photography scene up and really make us photographers sit up but it would be good to hear what the experts say!
joshwa Plus
10 927 1 United Kingdom
10 Apr 2018 11:33AM
Hi Raith,

Welcome to the site

We've got the P20 Pro, and 2 XL (and S9 Plus) here, and have access to an iPhone X, so we should be able to do some comparisons Smile

We've also reviewed the 1020, and original Nokia 808.

Thanks,
Josh
Raith 3 3
10 Apr 2018 12:04PM
Thanks Joshwa,

I am gradually feeling my way around the site.

Best,

Raith
ChrisV 14 2.3k 26 United Kingdom
10 Apr 2018 2:43PM

Quote:Has anyone got any views on this new revolutionary triple lens camera phone? I currently have a Nokia 1020 which is coming to the end of its life. Must confess I have almost abandoned my trusty Panasonic GH1 as generally speaking my photos to date are on a par with this traditional camera. The Pro 20 promises something even better so am seriously considering buying it. The saying that the best camera is the one you always have with you holds true with me and I am a far more active photographer as a result.


Looking at the specs it does look like it may possibly be the best non-dedicated [so discounting things like the Panasonic CM1] smartphone yet.

But it's still a phone and it still has sensors that are quite small - the largest being the size of a decent compact [so an improvement over most smartphones]. But there's more to an imaging device than the sensor and it's the ergonomics of a decent camera that allow creative control [along with a large sensor fast aperture combination among other things].

While I do think the future of mainstream photography is probably computational with multiple lens/sensor arrays, today's smartphones are no match for even a modest ILC with a decent sized sensor. Controls aside, in spite of its venerable vintage, I'd expect your GH1 to trounce any smartphone for pure IQ - especially in poorer light.
Raith 3 3
10 Apr 2018 4:47PM
You may be right Chris V but the night scene samples from the Pro 20 looks better than I currently achieve on my old GH1. I do wonder, however, if mobile phone camera technology continues to advance at the phenomenal rate achieved over the last two years that they may well catch up and well exceed the performance of conventional cameras. The are so convenient to carry as opposed to a 'normal' camera and it is interesting to note that the top suppliers are competing and putting more and more emphasis on the camera aspect of mobiles that I am keeping an open mind.

banehawi Plus
17 2.5k 4248 Canada
10 Apr 2018 5:25PM
You should upload some image to your portfolio.
banehawi Plus
17 2.5k 4248 Canada
10 Apr 2018 5:31PM
The comparison you are looking for has been done HERE
ChrisV 14 2.3k 26 United Kingdom
10 Apr 2018 6:06PM

Quote:You may be right Chris V but the night scene samples from the Pro 20 looks better than I currently achieve on my old GH1. I do wonder, however, if mobile phone camera technology continues to advance at the phenomenal rate achieved over the last two years that they may well catch up and well exceed the performance of conventional cameras. The are so convenient to carry as opposed to a 'normal' camera and it is interesting to note that the top suppliers are competing and putting more and more emphasis on the camera aspect of mobiles that I am keeping an open mind.




I think you may be deceiving yourself. First generation MfT sensors weren't that great in low light [it was the GF1 that first lured me into the system]. They topped out [iirc] at ISO1600 and you wouldn't want to pixel-peep at that setting.

There has been a lot of efficiency gain since then, so that today's modern 20Mp MfT sensors will easily outclass the 12mp first generation even at pixel level. Circuitry aside there are then the NR algorithms which have become a lot better.

But low-light smartphone images rarely go up to over ISO1000. When they're in the hundreds, you can usually very clearly see the effects of the noise reduction in them - detail is smeared or discarded to do away with grain. What you end up with at best is a pleasing watercolour effect that only really looks like a photo at screen resolution, if that.

If you're comparing any imaging device at a similar level of technology the important thing is overall sensor size. It's that very principal which is the major advance in multiple camera devices, because you can effectively [if the software works efficiently] add together the sensor areas to calculate the total light gathered. Three sensors means you're getting three times the light collected with the implications that has for sensitivity.

The P20 not only has 3 sensors, one of them is very large [for a smartphone, that is]. Nevertheless the overall sensor area is still very small even in comparison with the 4/3 sensor area and the gulf in sensitivity [camera generation aside] is most likely to correspond to that difference.

It's really the same principle as pixel-shift in 'conventional' cameras. The data [total light gathered] is combined to give a larger, or more sensitive or higher dynamic range image. The difference is of course that the multi-cams are capturing images simultaneously.

Don't get me wrong - I think in the future the paradigm for image capture is likely to go the way of the multiple-array device. You still however need a process capable of capturing similar light totals to large sensors* to compete with the performance of those and the P20 [and less so my iPhone X] are nowhere near that yet.

*And effectively combining it - the L16 is plagued with problems!
filmforever 13 775
19 Oct 2018 4:33PM
Would anyone be happy purchasing a Chinese smartphone, now that it has been publicly revealed in a media documentary that the Chinese government have a policy of secretly installing almost undetectable "spyware" in millions of their smartphones?

These may be aimed at mainly western government agency employees with the intention of picking up intelligence, but it's enough to deter me from purchasing any Chinese sourced smartphone.

Dennis45 2 42 Canada
19 Oct 2018 9:33PM
Been looking at a similar situation as the OP, and have been researching smartphones for the best camera for the money, in my case. Looking seriously at the Pixel, but don't like the idea of poor viewing quality at angles of their screens. Would appreciate any user opinions on this. Also looking at the X. Any follow-up here would be appreciated. I understand the advantages of a proper camera over a smartphone when it comes to image quality, but in my experience, folks are just getting to be very shy of cameras, even small ones, but seem to think smartphones are ok, and the OP's statement that he takes more images with the phone makes sense. If you aren't interested in producing art, or selling images, or impressing others, it's a very logical path to take these days. Here's one problem many of us face; storage of our images. I have been using a variety of cloud services for several years to store images from a variety of cameras, and some, like Adobe and Apple can be very expensive over time. The Google Pixel line of cameras include 2 years of unlimited and size storage, as do the Samsung cameras, at least here in Canada. I use an iPhone and ipad at present, and the cost is rising as my library in the cloud increases in size. I store very few images from my DSLR on icloud, because of the cost. Google allows unlimited storage of images with a max of 2000 pixels on the long side, I think, free. Adobe, to my knowledge is very expensive, especially for an amateur. If you're a pro, it's just the cost of doing business. So, right now, my choices seem to be the Pixel 2, 2XL, or iPhone X; each requiring a compromise. This doesn't mean I'll never use a proper camera again, I will, but for specialised photography; the smartphone is getting more and more use, and with Adobe embracing the ipad for editing, PS CC should be available soon in all its glory in the tablet, which is so much faster than my PC. I always have my smartphone in my shirt pocket, so it's always available.
LouiseTopp 10 634 United Kingdom
21 Oct 2018 1:01PM
I might go for the Huawei light or the mate

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