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I prefer to get it right in camera


ade_mcfade Plus
11 15.2k 216 England
12 May 2013 11:12AM
What are your "feelings" towards people who (usually smugly) say it in their forum posts? Wink

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arhb Plus
8 2.7k 68 United Kingdom
12 May 2013 11:27AM

Quote:What are your "feelings" towards people who (usually smugly) say it in their forum posts? Wink


It's fairly easy to assess from the post whether it's a wind-up or a frustrated rant, mainly from the use of emoticons Wink

Another type of photographer not mentioned yet on page one, is the one who used to enjoy a bit of post, but now has a business that doesn't allow time for post work Tongue
franken Plus
12 3.6k 4 Wales
12 May 2013 11:35AM
My interpretation of getting it right in camera goes back to my film days.

I did my utmost to get the exposer, sharpness and composition correct.

I then processed my films and arrived at a neg where I used exposer etc in order to get what I liked.

A bit like digital of today really.
JJGEE 10 6.5k 18 England
12 May 2013 11:36AM
Just one word is sufficient

Agree
Franticsmurf 13 829 Wales
12 May 2013 11:39AM
Depends on the context. I can usually ignore the 'I prefer to get it right in the camera' used as a criticism of post processing (the smug response) as it's a very narrow view. When used to describe a preferred way of working, I treat it as a personal opinion. We all have them, they often differ. So what?

I prefer to 'get it right in camera' because why would you not want to get it right in the camera? But I would not expect to print directly from the camera. My reason for this preference is because I don't particularly like sitting in front of the PC, just as I didn't like standing in the darkrooom when that was the only means of post processing.

I started photography using film and this may have influenced my views. I prefer digital because of the immediacy of the medium but the early influences are hard to overcome.

Dave
ade_mcfade Plus
11 15.2k 216 England
12 May 2013 11:41AM

Quote:Another type of photographer not mentioned yet on page one, is the one who used to enjoy a bit of post, but now has a business that doesn't allow time for post work Tongue


Hope I'm busy enough to be that photographer one day Wink
petebfrance 3 1.5k France
12 May 2013 12:43PM

Quote:What are your "feelings" towards people who (usually smugly) say it in their forum posts? Wink


I think it unlikely that anyone who's been on the forum for a while would say it smugly on a post 'again' - the reactions here are similar to those in a previous thread where somebody had the temerity to post that they preferred to get it right in the camera.

Well, I admit it. I prefer to get it right in the camera if I'm looking for a straight representation of a scene, which I usually am.
For me the fun is mostly about taking the photos - it's a sort of hobby, really. For example, last summer I got into photographing butterflies - it was tremendous fun, spotting them, stalking, photographing and so on.

On the other hand, for the two 'challenges' (Macro and B&W) that I enter on here I expect and enjoy post-processing.

If the picture has 'play value' then post-processing is fine, but for a record shot it's a right pain in the proverbial......
snapbandit 11 2.2k 3 Northern Ireland
12 May 2013 1:01PM
Again it's to do with context, maybe I'm the only one here who has met & been out with photographers who have the attitude of "I'll shoot away and fix it in photoshop", in that context I can understand someone taking a bit more time to "get it right (or as 'right' as they can) in the camera", it does not necessarily mean no post-shooting adjustments, just that there are some who rely on software on their computer to correct stuff they could have 'got right' when shooting, but were too lazy/rushed/inexperienced to do at the time (one even asked me later how to correct his out of focus shots as he had not focussed on the right bit of the picture! & was very dissapointed when I told him it couldn't be re-focussed in PS).

It's all to do with the context the phrase is used in!

My 2p
(speel cheekr not used as I prefeer to get it write in typings) Tongue
12 May 2013 1:36PM
I prefer to have my own style and individuality. I also disagree with the notion that post processing means there was something wrong with an image.
12 May 2013 1:48PM
Photoshop powers are over-hyped I think. If there are blown highlights - there's not much to be pulled out. Details can be faked, sure - but for that photoshop may not even be needed. Also, if image got misfocused - there will be nothing to do at all, but to change the original plan Wink
And doing everything "right" in camera is like painting with three basic colours - possible, but very limiting. Therefore my preference is to do it right, with whatever technique might be required. Only need to stay honest to myselfGrin
rhol2 Plus
4 347 1 United Kingdom
12 May 2013 1:56PM
Surely, it all depends on what we mean by "getting it right", which is hardly an objective term.Wink
ade_mcfade Plus
11 15.2k 216 England
12 May 2013 2:02PM
what is "it" ?
12 May 2013 2:08PM
Could you miss out my last sentence? The right is as I see it right, right? If seriously - photography as art is reflection of our vision, or better, ability to project our vision into other people's mind. This is individual. And photography as a document is an ability to reflect the reality on the paper (or digital medium) as most of us will see it. This is very complex too - and may be beyond capabilities of camera alone. Camera RAW is a digital negative to me. No one shows negatives...
redhed17 9 726 England
12 May 2013 2:09PM
I'd say good luck with that, and I hope it turns out how you want it to.

You should always try to get the best image you can in the circumstances you're in. As has been said, there will probably be less editing/processing needed later, if you do any at all.

If I go all the way to Italy on holiday say, (or go anywhere) and take the pictures as best as I can for the conditions, should that be it?

If I didn't get the perfect picture I wanted because of, conditions, weather, crowds, whatever, should I not use all the options I have to make the best final result I can from the picture I took? What you want/need to do is up to the individual.

If your technique is good enough to negate the wrong weather, people or immovable obstacles etc, then well done to you, because you have saved a lot of money on image editing software. Wink

Only Journalists need worry about not manipulating images, the rest of us can do what we want, or not. Smile
redhed17 9 726 England
12 May 2013 2:11PM

Quote:Photoshop powers are over-hyped I think. If there are blown highlights - there's not much to be pulled out.

It depends on how blown, and whether the format was Jpeg or Raw. Wink

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