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Imagination, creativity and photography


joolsb 16 27.1k 38 Switzerland
11 Jan 2009 9:45PM

Quote:but after light, composition is everything else - how the eye is led through the scene, what elements go where , how they're balanced out, what's not there..I could go on. This is where the creativity comes in IMO - see a good sunset yeah, but find the spot, angle, perspective and framing to fit it into a balanced, pleasing rectangular work of art

I think you're confusing creativity and craftsmanship, Stephen. Being truly creative means not following cliché and instead doing something totally different.
Boyd 17 11.2k 11 Wales
11 Jan 2009 9:50PM

Quote:Imagination, creativity and photography

If you need to ask then the first two are beyond you and the third is just a matter of soulless technical proficiency.
Tooth 16 5.8k 227 Ireland
11 Jan 2009 10:01PM

Quote:Being truly creative means not following cliché and instead doing something totally different


That would only apply if the result turned out the same each time Jools - you have to see a composition that someone standing next to you might not. As for doing something totally different, what artist in history did something totally different every time? Is an artist allowed a style? and if so how can a style develop if everything he/she does is totally different?
Eviscera 14 1.1k 149 United Kingdom
11 Jan 2009 10:08PM
erm , thats my exact problem. A constant struggle to unbind the "rules"


Dave
pennyspike 17 2.1k 29 United Kingdom
11 Jan 2009 10:19PM
Can't be doing with rules and conformity, too boring, but I do wish I had more artistic creativity.
ade_mcfade 16 15.2k 216 England
11 Jan 2009 11:15PM

Quote:I disagree there, there are plenty of examples in the normal gallery and the critique gallery which just feature a fantastic sunset sky and nothing else.


Yup - hundreds of them, and if you reread my bit is says....

can record a scene
ade_mcfade 16 15.2k 216 England
11 Jan 2009 11:27PM

Quote:I disagree there, there are plenty of examples in the normal gallery and the critique gallery which just feature a fantastic sunset sky and nothing else.


Yup - hundreds of them, I've commented on enough of them, but if you reread my bit is says....


Quote:can record a scene


which is different to


Quote:will record a scene


may look like playing semantics but the difference is marked - one says that there's a chance that they'll get a good shot, the other would be that they are bound to get a good shot.

SO to reiterate what I was saying.... given good light, the chances of getting a good shot are enhanced, but not a certainty. It levels up the playingfield a little

whereas in poor light a non-creative would be far less likely to get a memorable shot. The playing field becomes incredibly unlevel.

I think that's a fair comment and I've certainly been on shoots where I've been eeking what I can get out of a shoot whilst others have packed away long ago due to "bad light".

You don't always come up with the goods, but you've got to be in it to win it Smile
Tooth 16 5.8k 227 Ireland
11 Jan 2009 11:43PM
OK, that makes more sense now.. Wink in fact, quite agree..

and I think going back to my point about comp. etc being important, what it seems to boild down to is, if the light is good, then the chances of anyone coming up with a good shot are increased, but the more creative types will come up with something more different from the obvious..

but if the light is bad, you need to be more creative to get anything out of it....

so, to paraphrase Billy Connolly's "there's no such thing as bad weather, only the wrong clothes..",

it should be

"there's no such thing as bad light, only the wrong photograph.." Smile
Eviscera 14 1.1k 149 United Kingdom
11 Jan 2009 11:52PM
what artist in history did something totally different every time?

nite

we try
ade_mcfade 16 15.2k 216 England
12 Jan 2009 12:01AM
yeah - summed that up pretty well.

Also, you'd expect the "technically competent" to know about the basic rules of composition - most books they'll have read will mention the rule of 1/3's, use of lines etc. at some point.

So you could assume that they can set up a competent standard shot which would usually give a good result in good light.

but will all the will in the world, a standard set up in rubbish light is unlikely to create a groundbreaking shot.

Now if you get creative and start to experiment, then you can mitigate for the poor light by making a shot where the light has less importance - e.g. introduce some flash, avoid getting a grey sky in the shot all together, use a very long lens to isolate a subject, use a wide lens to get a quirky view on something...

When you stop thinking of re-creating Constable/cornish/waite landscapes and think of creative things, you can actually enjoy photography on pretty diabolical days.

But all our brains are wired up differently - I for instance do not have the patience to set up a shot, open my flask and sit waiting for the right light. So the vice versa must be true, others just don't see the point in meddling around with quirky stuff!
ade_mcfade 16 15.2k 216 England
12 Jan 2009 12:02AM

Quote:What artist in history did something totally different every time?

nite

we try



no one that I can think of

do you know any?
Nick_w Plus
13 4.3k 99 England
12 Jan 2009 12:24AM
I would say in all genres of photography, the really creative and I mean consistantly creative, always have a picture in the mind what they are aiming to achieve. Even wildlife, the best wildlife togs know their subject, habitat, and routine so can pre-plan to a degree. Otherwise how would the likes of Albi manage the Kingfisher montages.

Similarly with landscapes, most of the best exponents go with one thing or image in mind, know what time of year, weather is required they may have visited the site many times to get the light.

Those specialising in architecture may want dynamic images from a very low angle, they previsualise it and plan accordingly.

It was the same with the great artists, they planned meticulously what they wanted to put on canvas, anyone who has studied composition in depth will have looked at the work of DaVinci, the last supper was a masterpiece in composition, each figure carefully placed to utilise the golden section to the nth degree.
ade_mcfade 16 15.2k 216 England
12 Jan 2009 12:41AM
planning is a part of it, that's true.

like a research phase really - get to know a subject then go back when the conditions are right.

There's also the spontaneous and reactionary end of the spectrum - going out with no plan in mind, no location, just seeing what you can find and hoping to find something new that you can apply your skills to.
SuziBlue 18 16.2k 10 Scotland
12 Jan 2009 3:22AM

Quote:When you stop thinking of re-creating Constable/cornish/waite landscapes and think of creative things, you can actually enjoy photography on pretty diabolical days.


Couldn't agree more. If you're after a landscape it really shouldn't matter if it's throwing it down - there's a story and a beauty in that scene somewhere and it's just a question of interpreting it in a photographic format. Even then you may need to wait for light, but I'm more interested in interpreting what that current landscape says to me. So it's horizontal rain, the fields are flooded, the skies are grey, the wind is whistling - there's real beauty in that landscape if you let yourself see it.
joolsb 16 27.1k 38 Switzerland
12 Jan 2009 7:26AM

Quote:When you stop thinking of re-creating Constable/cornish/waite landscapes and think of creative things, you can actually enjoy photography on pretty diabolical days.


Very true.


Quote:But all our brains are wired up differently - I for instance do not have the patience to set up a shot, open my flask and sit waiting for the right light.


Been there, done that. And the results are usually *****. Besides, I'm always worrying that, in spending all my time sat at one particular point, I might be missing an even better shot round the corner....

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