GB Sports Photographer & The Panasonic LUMIX S1

Is It just my eye or my Camera?


24 Dec 2011 2:45PM
Hello just a quick question but I think my images are pretty soft, I focus where I'm supposed to and everything looks harp through the viewfinder but the finished article looks soft to me?

Is it also possible for your camera to deteriorate over the years and to top producing sharp images, or does it have anything to do with the amount of megapixles your camera has the sharper it will be.

I know all about apertures and getting the right one and the correct focusing helps, I'm pretty positive I do this.

It' rather annoying.

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

kodachrome 7 720
24 Dec 2011 3:09PM
There are a few factors that can contribute to 'soft' images, but it would really help if you can let us know the make and model number of your camera, what lens was fitted if its a DSLR and what settings you used.
Pete
LenShepherd 11 4.0k United Kingdom
24 Dec 2011 3:11PM
If the finished result is not sharp anywhere in the picture area the softness is camera movement preventing fine detail being recorded.
A link to a sample problem image might help.
DOGSBODY 11 1.4k 30 England
24 Dec 2011 3:24PM
It could be a camera fault. A friend has just had his Canon SLR repaired as it was no longer focussing on the correct point (back focussing or something) the repair cost 108. If the fault persists it would be worth getting the camera checked out.
66tricky 12 742 Scotland
24 Dec 2011 6:08PM

Quote:Hello just a quick question but I think my images are pretty soft, I focus where I'm supposed to and everything looks harp through the viewfinder but the finished article looks soft to me?

Is it also possible for your camera to deteriorate over the years and to top producing sharp images, or does it have anything to do with the amount of megapixles your camera has the sharper it will be.

I know all about apertures
and getting the right one and the correct focusing helps, I'm pretty positive I do this.

It' rather annoying.




I note you used f22 on "Follow the Sands". That will not help your sharpness at all due to diffraction. Diffraction is an optical effect which can limit the total resolution of your photography no matter how many megapixels your camera may have.

Also, the image was taken at 1/10s. Were you using a tripod? If so it could still be vibration caused by pressing the shutter. Focal length was 17mm. at F22 you would have "acceptable" sharpness from 1.2' to infinity, focusing at 2.5ft. You could have range from 2.25' to infinity at f11 focusing at 4.5' and have sharper images as the lens will without doubt resolve better at f11. The flare caused by the exposed sun in that shot will also tend to rob the image somewhat of punch.
MikeA 14 1.3k England
24 Dec 2011 6:09PM
Have you tried adjusting the viewfinder assuming that you can, check out your manual.

Below is an example, adjust the viewfinder until the focusing bracket indicators are sharp.

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/ND40/ND40VIEWFINDER.HTM
adrian_w Plus
12 3.8k 4 England
24 Dec 2011 7:20PM
If you are using the canon 18-55 that could account for it. Some of those lenses do give a soft image.
User_Removed 15 3.3k 4 United Kingdom
24 Dec 2011 7:32PM
What's your workflow? DSLR images need sharpening and the JPEG default is less than on compacts, with raw you have to remember to sharpen yourself in software. Take the advice about the dioptre adjustment and the diffraction problem. Try some tripod test shots at f11-f16, post any that are soft
mikehit 10 8.0k 13 United Kingdom
25 Dec 2011 10:50PM
If you are worried about lens/camera sharpness then you need to remove all variable: set your camera to low ISO and aperture of f8. Mount the camera to a solid tripod, set to mirror lock up (or liveview) - if using mirror lockup you need to half-press the shutter and wait 2 seconds before pressing all the way, use a cable release (or self-timer) and turn off any image stabilisation. And use autofocus on a high-congtrast subjet. While you are at it, use AF then look through the viewfinder to see if your dioptre setting needs adjusting. Then take a few pictures.
If that is OK then you can play around with apertures and you will usually find that the camera is sharpest 2 stops down from the widest and will start deteriorating again f16 and smaller due to diffraction.
davewaine 12 141 3 England
26 Dec 2011 5:13AM
Don't take this the wrong way, but have you had your eyes tested recently? Even the healthiest vision deteriorates as we age. That is simple wear and tear. Most modern DSLRs come with dioptric correction built into the viewfinder and an optician would be able to advise you on the correct setting for your eyes.
26 Dec 2011 1:49PM
Thanks for all these great suggestions, really appreciate all your help and I'm going to try a bit of what you've all mentioned. Clearly I don't know as much as I thought I did, I always have liked Ephotozine for everyone's great honest help and opinions. When I get back out over the next few weeks I will try and use apertures under f22 and see if it helps with the sharpness, the only reason I used that was to get a longer shutter speed for water motion, next time I shall invest in some more ND filters.

I also haven't had my eyes tested in about 15 years which I know isn't great, typical man I will get round to it at some point.

My camera is a Canon 20D about 9 years old, got sensor clean recently too
Cant be my lenses 17-40mmL and 50 f1.4

It's mostly just my landscape/seascape images which I feel are not too sharp.

Thanks all
megtyler 7 12 United States
1 Jan 2012 4:06PM
9 years old? get it cleaned. it's the camera.
i am assuming your vision is 20/20


Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.