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Mirrorless, the Emperor's New Clothes


rhody 16 2.8k 2 United Kingdom
10 Dec 2018 1:50PM

Quote:Back in the 1970s, I was using Leica M for theatrical photography. That said, I hated Leica M overall .


I'm just curious why you hated the Leica M? I never used one professionally (only for pleasure and leisure) but I still really like my M6.

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thewilliam2 2 1.1k
10 Dec 2018 2:00PM
I always did prefer SLR viewfinders or the ground-glass of a view camera because I felt that I knew what I was going to get and the depth of field was less of a guess. Yes, I know there were DoF markers on the lens but I had to take the camera away from my eye.
rhody 16 2.8k 2 United Kingdom
10 Dec 2018 2:04PM

Quote:I always did prefer SLR viewfinders or the ground-glass of a view camera because I felt that I knew what I was going to get and the depth of field was less of a guess. Yes, I know there were DoF markers on the lens but I had to take the camera away from my eye.


I used to use pre-focus and DoF a lot on mine for that very reason. Talking about it on here has made me want to run a roll through it again!! Grin
thewilliam2 2 1.1k
10 Dec 2018 11:55PM
Another problem with Leica M is that it's possible to photograph with the lens cap fitted and not realise!
rhody 16 2.8k 2 United Kingdom
11 Dec 2018 2:27AM

Quote:Another problem with Leica M is that it's possible to photograph with the lens cap fitted and not realise!

Guilty Your Honour!!! Grin
thewilliam2 2 1.1k
11 Dec 2018 11:43AM
Remember Victor Blackman? There was a story where Blackman had door-stepped a famous actress and started to take pictures. The actress knew Blackman faily well and she made gesticulations about his camera. Blackman assumed she didn't want pictured so just continued. The actress then played up to the camera gave Blackman lots of expressions that were sure-fire winners.

It wasn't until the actress was inside her limo and being driven away that Blackman realised that he'd forgotten to remove the lens cap of his Leica M and that the actress was trying to warn him!
JJGEE 14 7.4k 18 England
11 Dec 2018 3:11PM

Quote:Remember Victor Blackman?

I do.
Was in the days when I bought AP every week and he was a columnist and made for very good reading.

He also visited Park Cameras Annual Show giving talks / demonstrations ... in the days when they had a Miss Park Cameras beauty competition Smile


I shoot Sony and love the EVF, but it really come down to what your comfortable with. I don't have any issues with dust on my sensor and would think mirror or not dust will get on the sensor regardless in some conditions. I have a friend that has a D850 and we did a trip together shoot landscape photos. We were shooting quite a few longer exposure shots and he had to constantly remember to lock the mirror and he still had light bleed issues which with my mirrorless system I never had to think about or encounter. Regardless which brand, all the higher end bodies are good and have their strengths and weakness. Buy what you like and what works for you.
WX 1
8 Jan 2019 2:33PM

Quote:There's a whole lot of scare stuff about sensor ckeaning. The sensor doesn't get dirty, the protective glass in front of it does. What you see is the shadow of the dirt. It is perfectly straightforward it clean it when you need to. My personal experience is that where dirt is concerned there's no difference between mirror or non.


I have the impression that the sensors in my Sony mirrrorless cameras catch more dust than my Canon DSLRs. And I really don't swap lenses so frequently, I usually carry two bodies just to avoid swapping.

A Sony technician told me that the sensors in cameras with in-body stabilization (a7R II, a7R III, etc.) should not be touched during cleaning. It might decalibrate the IBIS.

I like my Sony cameras but I really wish their sensors had some sort of protecting mechanism.
rhody 16 2.8k 2 United Kingdom
9 Jan 2019 5:27AM

Quote:I have the impression that the sensors in my Sony mirrrorless cameras catch more dust than my Canon DSLRs. And I really don't swap lenses so frequently, I usually carry two bodies just to avoid swapping.

A Sony technician told me that the sensors in cameras with in-body stabilization (a7R II, a7R III, etc.) should not be touched during cleaning. It might decalibrate the IBIS.



Welcome to epz WX. As an owner of one of the cameras you mention, in your opinion, is it best then to avoid DIY sensor cleaning at home and leave it to the dealers and specialists?

rhody 16 2.8k 2 United Kingdom
11 Jan 2019 11:18AM
Sony's own advice for sensor cleaning "E" and "A" mount sensors. Read and act with care methinks!!

Cleaning Sony Sensors
LenShepherd 11 3.8k United Kingdom
13 Jan 2019 9:58PM

Quote:

I have the impression that the sensors in my Sony mirrrorless cameras catch more dust than my Canon DSLRs. And I really don't swap lenses so frequently, I usually carry two bodies just to avoid swapping.

A Sony technician told me that the sensors in cameras with in-body stabilization (a7R II, a7R III, etc.) should not be touched during cleaning. It might decalibrate the IBIS.

I like my Sony cameras but I really wish their sensors had some sort of protecting mechanism.


ML are more prone to dust because the mirror in a DSLR stops some dust getting through to the sensor.
The Nikon Z 6 & 7 sensors are locked when they are powered off. With the sensor much closer to the extra large diameter mount, cleaning Nikon ML sensors seems much more straightforward than Sony.

Canon R cover the sensor with a shutter when the camera is powered off, so even better. Also (for better or worse) Canon R does not have IBIS to possibly disturb.
Chris_L 5 5.0k United Kingdom
16 Jan 2019 1:06AM
I once read with horror someone on here say that he never cleaned his sensor until he started seeing large blobs on skies, then he'd give it a good blast with the blower, maybe swab with fluid once a year.

At the time I was spending ages with all sorts of gadgets shooting white walls at f22 and hunting down dust particles.

Now I am that guy I talked about Grin

I reckon most damage to sensors is caused by people cleaning them.

One friend screwed up a 5D when his fancy Arctic Butterfly got some kind of grease onto it, from the inside of the camera body on the way to the sensor.

Another pal somehow managed to get an Eclipse fluid watermark on the wrong side of the glass, he was lucky and sympathetic dealer got it sorted as a warranty repair.

If I go shoot a white wall now at f16 there will be spots, I reckon at least 2 or 3 largish and a few tiny ones. I'm just not going to bother shooting a wall. If it gets to the point where it bothers me, get the loupe out, rocket blower and maybe sensor pen thing . Sometimes takes as long as ten minutes to get every speck.

Just Jas 17 26.3k 1 England
18 Jan 2019 11:13AM
I
Quote:t wasn't until the actress was inside her limo and being driven away that Blackman realised that he'd forgotten to remove the lens cap of his Leica M and that the actress was trying to warn him!


Blackman favoured range finder cameras i.e. Leicas. He later changed to SLRs.
20 Jan 2019 4:01PM
Canon least expensive mirrorless. I have had zero dust problems. May be because:

Self Cleaning Sensor Unit
Removes dust adhering to the low-pass filter.
Self-cleaning can be done automatically when the power is turned on or off (taking about 2 sec. as indicated on the screen) or
manually (taking about 9 sec. as indicated on the screen).
After manually activated cleaning, the camera will automatically restart (Power OFF to ON).
When you use Multi Shot Noise Reduction, Clean now cannot be selected.

Dust Delete Data acquisition and appending
The coordinates of the dust adhering to the low-pass filter are detected by a test shot and appended to subsequent images.
The dust coordinate data appended to the image is used by the provided software to automatically erase the dust spots.

Manual cleaning (by hand)

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